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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everybody. I hope you're all safe from the virus and that it hasn't disrupted your lives too much. I adjusted and lubed my chain this morning (was kind of overdue as I was approaching the 1 1/2" of slack but I was waiting for nicer and warmer days to do it and today was THE day here in MD :p). It's now down to a little above 3/4" (the slack I mean). Nuts re-tightened and I checked the wheel alignment of course, and then I rechecked the slack (hasn't moved) an hour later, everything seems OK. Except that it looks like according to the sticker (see below) the chain should be replaced? I wonder if that's accurate, the bike only has a little over 7,000 miles and it's an O-ring chain... I read somewhere that 1) these stickers are not always accurate and 2) when facing the rear sprocket, if you pull on the chain at the 3 o'clock position and you can't lift it from the sprocket then it's OK, is that a good test? Mine doesn't... I'd like to avoid replacing the chain if it doesn't need to be replaced :-D

305090
 

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I wouldn't say the stickers aren't reasonably accurate, but the method of pulling the chain off the sprocket is a valid one - it shows you how much wear there is between link pins and that is why chains stretch as well as start to wear the sprocket teeth, because as the chain gets longer between each link, the rollers of the chain don't ride in the bottom of each sprocket tooth as intended
 

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I take warning labels like this as advisory info. Meaning that it's advising that fairly soon you will need a chain. So start looking for a decent deal on one, look at replacement sprockets at the same time. Buy when it's good.
In the mean time keep lubing the chain every 300 miles or 2 tanks of fuel.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
OK, thanks. 7k miles is fairly early for a replacement, no? Shouldn't I get a good 15k miles out of an O-ring chain? The bike was used for safety classes before I got it, I imagine it's possible they didn't maintain the chain super well... I've done about 5k miles on it so far and I've been cleaning/lubing the chain pretty religiously (although other this winter like I said I let the slack get close to 1 1/2" but it's within the recommended range so I don't think I was being extremely rough on it)...
 

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It's not like you're doing holeshots or taking it to the drag strip (unless you are), so I wouldn't worry about it right away, as Jim said. Keep your eyes on it and plan to replace chain and sprockets together, then you'll maximize the long term.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
It's not like you're doing holeshots or taking it to the drag strip (unless you are)
Mmmh, let me ask my wife... no, it seems like I can't do that! :-D Yeah it's not like I'm trying to transfer 200hp to that rear wheal through the chain... more like 20 on a good day. :-D

OK, thanks. From what I read it looks like when it starts to sag regardless of how much I adjust it, it'll be time to replace. That being said it seems a bit extreme...
 

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Sticker doesn't mean anything unless that's the original chain. I doubt Honda was spending the money to install o-ring chains on mass-produced bikes in those days. If it's a snug fit on the sprocket the chain is unworn and good to go. Probably on there to satisfy some silly DOT requirement (they think we're too stupid to maintain our vehicles properly).
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It's actually relatively recent (2007) so I assumed it was the original chain...
 
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