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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I wanted to share my workshop space / family hangout spot/ Man-cave attached to the house (back half of a 2 car garage). I'm newer on here so I'm not sure if this has been done. I would love to see other similar spots indoors or out to get some ideas for what works well. I'm interested in building a table of sorts rather than purchasing one from Harbor Freight or the like. I have seen a few great ideas here :). Thanks to all of the invaluable knowledge and information available :cool: . It's much appreciated on many levels!!
IMG956378 (002).jpg
my 72 SL175 that should be back together this weekend.
 

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Welcome to the forum. You seem to like the SL series... :)
You're right that this kind of thread has been posted already. I've started a similar thread a while ago.

https://www.hondatwins.net/forums/3-off-topic/118504-where-do-you-spend-your-time.html

But I was moving meanwhile so here is my new workspace. I'm still in the process of setting things up (like a raised work stand). But unfortunatly this space is temporary because me and my family will have to move again in two years. I absolutely enjoy this space though because it has plenty of daylight, a lot of room to spread out things on the floor and it has floor heating. Quite an improvement to my previous shop in an old garage but I loved that too. The really nice thing about my new work space is that I can see the bike from the kitchen window at the sink what makes doing the dishes so much more pleasant :grin:

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Welcome aboard. I'm a bit confused though. When you say "build a table" are you talking about a workbench or a raised platform for the bike? The latter being the time tested predecessor of the hydraulic bike lift.

For a workbench, I strongly suggest you make it heavier than you can imagine ever needing it. A top made of at least 2 inch dimensional lumber (2x10, 2x12, etc.) and legs adequate and rigid enough to support it and ANYTHING you can put on it. There is no such thing as overkill in a strong workbench! You can get by with much, much less. Invest in the sturdiest you can afford though. You will never regret it. I can't say the same for going flimsier. ;)

THE most useful thing you can put on that bench is a vise - again, the best you can afford. Check out flea markets and secondhand shops. Even (ah hem) "antique shops" before commiting to a $100+ modern vise. Most if not all vises today are made in Asia and while not a blanket condemnation, most are cast rather than forged. Older vises are stronger and able to take the abuse you will give it. They were intended to be beat on and have the spindle "tapped" tight with a hammer. :cool: Do that with most new vises and you'll have pieces of cast iron on the floor.

As for your work space. Whatever you can get will work! Yes. Shed, garage, patio... While I'm horrible about observing it myself, I also recommend doing your best to keep it... umm "orderly." Clean is sort of an oxymoron concerning a workshop, but make places for things. A good tool chest is indispensable, but shelves, drawers, even a particular corner of the room is better than wondering where you left your 10mm wrench last time. To that end, that glass curio cabinet in your photo would be in serious danger in proximity to me while working. :eek::grin:

Good luck. Best wishes, and just do it! Your work space will evolve with time and interest.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Welcome to the forum. You seem to like the SL series... :)
You're right that this kind of thread has been posted already. I've started a similar thread a while ago.

https://www.hondatwins.net/forums/3-off-topic/118504-where-do-you-spend-your-time.html

But I was moving meanwhile so here is my new workspace. I'm still in the process of setting things up (like a raised work stand). But unfortunatly this space is temporary because me and my family will have to move again in two years. I absolutely enjoy this space though because it has plenty of daylight, a lot of room to spread out things on the floor and it has floor heating. Quite an improvement to my previous shop in an old garage but I loved that too. The really nice thing about my new work space is that I can see the bike from the kitchen window at the sink what makes doing the dishes so much more pleasant :grin:

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FrisianWheel, Thats a great space you have there and thanks to the link to the thread! Love how much light you have. My SL interest has a great back story. I ended up with a basket case SL175 and when looking for a donor bikes I found more "I just couldn't pass up" Since I ended up in the SL line I wanted to get into a little bigger bike so the 350's are new to me. I love the styling and they kind of remind me of an old Harley sprint we used to ride when I was younger.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Welcome aboard. I'm a bit confused though. When you say "build a table" are you talking about a workbench or a raised platform for the bike? The latter being the time tested predecessor of the hydraulic bike lift.

For a workbench, I strongly suggest you make it heavier than you can imagine ever needing it. A top made of at least 2 inch dimensional lumber (2x10, 2x12, etc.) and legs adequate and rigid enough to support it and ANYTHING you can put on it. There is no such thing as overkill in a strong workbench! You can get by with much, much less. Invest in the sturdiest you can afford though. You will never regret it. I can't say the same for going flimsier. ;)

THE most useful thing you can put on that bench is a vise - again, the best you can afford. Check out flea markets and secondhand shops. Even (ah hem) "antique shops" before commiting to a $100+ modern vise. Most if not all vises today are made in Asia and while not a blanket condemnation, most are cast rather than forged. Older vises are stronger and able to take the abuse you will give it. They were intended to be beat on and have the spindle "tapped" tight with a hammer. :cool: Do that with most new vises and you'll have pieces of cast iron on the floor.

As for your work space. Whatever you can get will work! Yes. Shed, garage, patio... While I'm horrible about observing it myself, I also recommend doing your best to keep it... umm "orderly." Clean is sort of an oxymoron concerning a workshop, but make places for things. A good tool chest is indispensable, but shelves, drawers, even a particular corner of the room is better than wondering where you left your 10mm wrench last time. To that end, that glass curio cabinet in your photo would be in serious danger in proximity to me while working. :eek::grin:

Good luck. Best wishes, and just do it! Your work space will evolve with time and interest.
Oupa, thanks for the reply. The workbench is an 1 3/4 solid core birch door slab and works wonderfully. I'm looking around for more ideas for a raised work surface for my bikes. I have a 2 x 12 and a few sawhorses that work well for the 100's and 175. but I'm gonna need more for the 350 im starting. I have been building stuff for over 20 years and Im in the construction industry so I have some cool ideas just wanted to see what others have made before I do. Thats a great idea for vises too. I have a few, but I love yard-sales and will keep an eye out for a bigger non harbor freight version for sure. I agree organization is definitely key and every tool I have has a place for sure. I found recently that the long magnetic strips that HF sells work fantastic for sockets as you can just stick them too it (ill upload a pic soon if interested.

The cabinet has survived for now! thats saying a lot with five kids and a new puppy.

I would like to start a project log soon for the SL350 i'll be starting. Again I have to say this site inspired me to dive in further and goes along with the pleasure of working on my own bikes. I'm not entirely new to the game I grew up in Santa Cruz riding. We used to play with Harley sprints and old school Triumph choppers. My first was a 69 650 Bonneville with a square stock girder front end. I know I'm preaching to the choir as I'm only 40 and a lot of you were actually playing with bikes back then before I was born. I've been reading a lot on here but wanted to start trying to actually post some stuff. Thanks again to you and anyone else reading this.
 

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shop2.jpg
One end of my shop/mancave
I do want to mention that solid core doors are cored with particle board and have no linear structure other than the 2 skins approx 1/8 thick, they will always bow downwards when used horizontally even with no real weight on them. Salvaged bowling alley either the maple or the pine sections makes for an awesome benchtop but because of the case hardened nails used to construct the alleys it can be difficult to size. SYP (southern yellow pine) 2x material is a great value and almost twice the density of SPF (spruce pine fir) framing lumber, although some regions also get hemlock and larch mixed into SPF lumber, both are super hard and dense (for softwoods). I like the recycled pallet shelving shown in your pic, a clever re-purposing.
 

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Mine is a 26x36 block garage with pull-down attic access and it has 2 a/c units, the newer of which also heats (but I haven't really needed it yet) plus 3/4" foil-covered foam board on the 2 garage doors and the entire ceiling. It's always 8° to 10° cooler or warmer inside than the outside. I splurged on a drop tail lift from Derek Weaver and it's awesome

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