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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been doing some work on my bike this fall but it looks like winter hit before I could get it back out again. I read an article on winterizing your bike (http://www.z1enterprises.com/bikemaintenance.aspx) which has some great advice but I also ended up with a few questions.

While I was working on the bike the past two months, the gas tank was mostly (but not totally) filled. The upper inside began to rust just slightly. If I run my finger around the inside I can wipe a bit of it off. So what's the best way to avoid rust and keep the carbs clean over the winter? Here's what I've been thinking:

1) Completely fill the gas tank (treated with STA-BIL). Run for 5 minutes to get it in the carbs.
2) Completely drain the tank/carbs.

Which method would be best though? If I fill it, does it need to be filled to the brim? If I drain it, does it need to be bone dry? Is the very slight bit of rust in the tank right now going to cause me a headache later and if so, is there an easy way to clean it out?

Any other advice on winter bike care would be great.
 

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This is a close relative to the "what oil should I use" question.

Some drain the tank/carbs, some fill them.

Some let the air out of the tires, some overinflate them.

Some cover the bike, some don't.

Some remove (or at least disconnect) the battery, some don't.

Some just take the key out.

And some of the Southern dudes just say "Huh? Why would you do that?"

Pick a plan you're comfortable with and give it a try. If it works for you you can keep doing it. If it doesn't, you can try something else next year. After all, we're all about fixin stuff, :) aren't we?
 

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I'd love to start them up every weekend but some things just don't work when it's twenty degrees below zero. (Somehow it doesn't sound as bad when you spell it out)
 

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J-T said:
I'd love to start them up every weekend but some things just don't work when it's twenty degrees below zero. (Somehow it doesn't sound as bad when you spell it out)
I keep them on battery tenders, so they start, and it gets pretty darned cold here on Lake Michigan - my "shop" is unheated and totally drafty......
 

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my friend insists that the rubber diaphragms in the cb350 carbs don't like the cold - there are 4 of us sharing a garage and 3 have 350s and we've all removed our carbs for the winter - I don't know if it's required, but I hate when my friend says that he told me so
 

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I never thought about the cold and the diaphragms but that might make sense.
I fill my tanks as full as I can get them with Sta Bil in the gas and I drain the carbs. I take the batteries out of the bike and put them on a battery tender.
I cover the bikes with a bike cover that can breathe. The garage I have now is pretty dry and I have heat that I turn on when I am out there working so it stays pretty dry. I park the bikes on a tarp or something that will insulate them from any moisture that might come up through the concrete floor.

Now that I sold all of my 350's I dont have to worry about diaphragms anymore.
don
 

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I take the batteries out. Put them back to start the bike up every 2 months.

Never ever had a problem. No stabil, no rust, no nuthin.
 

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Rubber responds "backwards" to hot and cold... It expands when cold and "shrinks" when heated..... So winter should do nothing more than allow the diaphragm to expand, not to "pull tight and tear" as rumor would have it....

Simple demo: Cut a rubber band so you have a rubber "string"
Weight one end slightly (a large paperclip works...)
Hold the band so the weight pulls/holds it vertically straight when held at the other end
Bring a lit match close to the band and watch it lift the weight as it contracts......
 

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Yeah i just hate winter, i usually winterise my bikes by riding them more...would you believe that the temp when this photo was taken was 15C :roll: and I had a thermal singlet on :shock:

 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
What is the process for draining the carbs? Is that recommended over leaving it full of fuel w/ sta-bil? I don't know that I want to totally pull the carbs since I might get a little bit of riding in yet and I'm also going to be moving soon. Don't want to leave a bike in pieces if I have to haul it (and everything else I own) away sometime soon.

I must say though, I do like the idea of bundling up and keeping the bike running all winter! :D
 

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No need to pull the carbs. Just close the petcock then open the drain screws located on the bottom of each carb bowl and the fuel will drain out through the two hoses which exit under the right side about even with the front of the rear tire. This of course assumes that the drain lines are properly installed.

A lot of guys will start the bike, turn the petcock off, and let it run until it dies of fuel starvation. That way there's less fuel to drain.
 

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I wonder how many tried the rubberband / paperclip experiment.... Anybody willing to 'fess up?
 

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66Sprint said:
I wonder how many tried the rubberband / paperclip experiment.... Anybody willing to 'fess up?
I tried, but ended up smoking the rubber band........good stuff. :eek: :shock: :?
 

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J-T said:
No need to pull the carbs. Just close the petcock then open the drain screws located on the bottom of each carb bowl and the fuel will drain out through the two hoses which exit under the right side about even with the front of the rear tire. This of course assumes that the drain lines are properly installed.

A lot of guys will start the bike, turn the petcock off, and let it run until it dies of fuel starvation. That way there's less fuel to drain.
My 1970 CL350 carbs drain through the drain screws themselves; the hoses are for the overflow. :geek:

I'm running mine through the winter, but for my CT90, I've added Sta-Bil to the tank and keep it filled to the top. I have a battery tender plug wired in, so if I want to top it up, I can. Usually, I just go out there and kick it up and let it run for a bit, then shut off the petcock and let it run out of fuel. If it were really getting cold, I might take the battery in.

I keep it covered, and I have it on the center stand with some wooden boards under the wheels to keep the tires from freezing to the ground.
 

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This is a great thread, I was hoping there was a guide on winter storage somewhere here...

I realize this is about 4 years old, but does anyone have an opinion on whether or not to completely fill the case to the brim with oil or just keep the recommended levels in there?
By my logic, displacing any air is a good thing ... what do we think?

Michael
 
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