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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I'm pulling the motor next week and I am doing new pistons rings and getting the head cleaned valves lapped etc. I might split the cases only if I decide to paint. I already have a flywheel puller other than that any tools I should pick up? Also I am waiting to see the condition of the cylinders before ordering the pistons and rings. My main question is where do you guys normally get your gasket kits oil seals etc? And other than the oil seal for the valves is there anything else I would need to get for the machinist as far as the head goes? Oh yeah and where is the best place to pick up the 4 prong honda tool? I'm guessing motion pro. Thanks in advance.
 

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MotionPro will have the oil filter tool for you. Other than that, a pair of snap-ring pliers is handy to have.. A pick set is handy to have around to remove old oil seals too.. Maybe a good gasket scraper too... Also, a good hammer type impact driver may just save your butt when removing stubborn screws/bolts..

You're wise to wait on your machinists advice/results before buying pistons/rings.. Those measurements will determine how far oversize you have to go when boring/honing the jugs..

Search on here for "acetone" testing on the valves.

Gasket sets can often be had on Ebay for cheap.. The same goes for oil seals, etc...

GB :mrgreen:
 

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owdskl said:
.......the 4 prong honda tool?
What ? :shock:
What's a 4 prong Honda tool ?
 

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RicH2 said:
owdskl said:
.......the 4 prong honda tool?
What ? :shock:
What's a 4 prong Honda tool ?

Just don't sit on it, ouch :lol: You need a special four pronged tool to remove the nut (9) that retains the oil filter(3) (spinner) so you can clean it effectively. So you need one of these :D :D




Rod from OZ :cool:
 

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If you will be reassembling the engine yourself, you will need a tool to install the torsion bars. I think they sell one but I made my own by cutting a notch in a cheap socket. I smoothed out the notch so it wouldn't gall the end of the torsion bar. You don't need it to remove the torsion bars. My mechanic that did my valve seats gave me the torque spec to use when reinstalling the torsion bars to make sure the new valve seats didn't "loosen" the bars too much.
 

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Flugtechnik said:
If you will be reassembling the engine yourself, you will need a tool to install the torsion bars. I think they sell one but I made my own by cutting a notch in a cheap socket. I smoothed out the notch so it wouldn't gall the end of the torsion bar. You don't need it to remove the torsion bars. My mechanic that did my valve seats gave me the torque spec to use when reinstalling the torsion bars to make sure the new valve seats didn't "loosen" the bars too much.
Hmmm, maybe I did something wrong but I didn't need a special tool to reinstall the torsion bars.

BiLL??
 

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MNellis said:
Hmmm, maybe I did something wrong but I didn't need a special tool to reinstall the torsion bars.

BiLL??

I suppose there is a tool, I think also a torque-meter version.

But I just use a big screwdriver or a padded channel-lock grip.
 

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tbpmusic said:
MNellis said:
Hmmm, maybe I did something wrong but I didn't need a special tool to reinstall the torsion bars.

BiLL??

I suppose there is a tool, I think also a torque-meter version.

But I just use a big screwdriver or a padded channel-lock grip.
Yea, thinking back I think I just used the appropriate sized open end wrench (1/2 or 9/16) to tweak it into position.
 

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I'm not discounting the value of the proper tool, I have never heard of one. I probably didn't read the manual very thoroughly but I didn't know there was a spec for the torsion springs either. When I put mine together, unless they were totally shot, I wouldn't have replaced them anyway.

For my information, what is the torque value for the spring tension suppose to be? Is it a certain tension at some particular valve lift?
 

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MNellis said:
I'm not discounting the value of the proper tool, I have never heard of one. I probably didn't read the manual very thoroughly but I didn't know there was a spec for the torsion springs either. When I put mine together, unless they were totally shot, I wouldn't have replaced them anyway.

For my information, what is the torque value for the spring tension suppose to be? Is it a certain tension at some particular valve lift?
The manual does suggest using a torque meter to measure the "preload" you have to put on it to slip it on the little knock pin.
I've never seen the adapter you would undoubtedly need, the manual makes no reference of it, or any particular value.
 

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tbpmusic said:
MNellis said:
I'm not discounting the value of the proper tool, I have never heard of one. I probably didn't read the manual very thoroughly but I didn't know there was a spec for the torsion springs either. When I put mine together, unless they were totally shot, I wouldn't have replaced them anyway.

For my information, what is the torque value for the spring tension suppose to be? Is it a certain tension at some particular valve lift?
The manual does suggest using a torque meter to measure the "preload" you have to put on it to slip it on the little knock pin.
I've never seen the adapter you would undoubtedly need, the manual makes no reference of it, or any particular value.

Thanks for the update. I always learning new stuff.
 

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I've got the spec at home so I will post it when I get back from the break. As I said, I'm only checking the install torque required to get the spring onto the knock pin because I had my valve seats redone and I need to make sure the slight movement of the valve faces didn't unload the spring too much. As for the tool, I can't seem to find where I saw it before, but I imagine it would be required if one was using a torque wrench.

It looks like this, but I rounded the edges of the notch to keep from galling the spring.


Anyway, I guess this is a tool you don't really "need".
 

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Flugtechnik said:


Anyway, I guess this is a tool you don't really "need".
Actually, it might be a handy tool to have. I can see how it works and as long as the socket attachment point is in line with the center line of the torsion bar, it can give you some useful information. With standard coil springs, we used to set up "installed spring" heights and they needed to have a certain pressure at a certain valve lift. With the torsion bar setup, this tool and a good torque wrench would be one way to do that if you had a spec for ft. lbs. at a certain valve lift. I can see putting a dial indicator on the valve and measuring the lift while then comparing that with the amount of force to get to that lift. For blueprinting purposes it makes sense but, unlike coil springs, I don't see how it could be adjusted. With coil spring you can shim the coils so they all match the stiffest spring as long as the springs don't "coil bind" at max lift.

Thanks for the picture.
 

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Over time, you just get a feel for the pressure needed to slip it on the knock pin.
If it doesn't feel strong enough, it's obvious to you right away.....
 

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OK, the torque spec my mechanic gave me is 42-61 in-lbs to install the torsion bars. He just wrote it on a piece of paper he gave me so I'm guessing he got it from his super secret Honda mechanics manual.

Lets get this thread back on track. Is there anything else owdskl needs?
 

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I have a drawer full of tools that I have altered for specific jobs. After all of the British cars, and other peoples junk (motorcycle projects) that I have worked on I have needed quite a few. I usually have something that can be sacrificed to make the proper tool. Some of them have even worked. :lol:
My favorite was an open ended wrench that I reworked to install the solenoid on an overdrive transmission on a Triumph sports car. That tool got shipped all over the place to others that were doing the same job on another list that I was on at the time. It was quite famous in that circle of friends and was copied quite a bit.
Thanks for sharing the socket you made. If I ever take my 450 down that far I will make one too.
Don
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
So I pulled the motor and pulled the head and cylinders off. I was going to leave the cases alone but I noticed a large chunk of circular plastic fell out of the cases. When I spin the crank something is definatly in there. Sounds like it's close to the main bearings. Anyway what tool do I need for the special nut on the clutch? Do I just chisel or tool? Are the threads right or left hand? Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Nevermind. Just figured it out. I thought there was a special nut but apparently I was drinking before I asked. :)
 
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