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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A little less than a month ago, I brought home a 1975 CB200T and joined this excellent forum. You see, my bike purchase was to take me back to my earlier riding and tinkering days (on much larger bikes). I'm writing to thank you and share what I've learned with others in possibly similar circumstances.

Warning: I have not worked on a bike for over 20 years. What's so apparent to most of you - like intake versus exhaust side of the engine - I had to re-learn. So, instead of buying Clymers and jumping in, I decided to read random posts and later specific threads that dealt with issues on my bike. What I learned saved me hours of potential frustration. After (in order) changing the oil, charging the battery, new plugs, and caps, adjusting the cam chain, checking valve clearance, and checking point timing, I have a very smooth running bike. Discussions about the importance of battery health, difference in plugs and caps (resistor or not), and tools and tips on adjustments all made a difference.

With some success, I was ready to troubleshoot a non-working headlight and an always-on brake light. Again, I went back to reading the discussion threads. Luckily, I did because I was previously examining my wiring diagram and ready to inspect every possible potential trouble spot. I read a thread where Sprint66/Steve mentioned issues stemming from lousy kill/starter switches. So, I started by opening the switch and squirting in some WD40. My headlight works excellent now. On the brake light, just last night, I came across threads about bulbs, grounding, and such. It never occurred to me that I might just have a bad lamp. Jumping out of bed (really), I pulled out the bulb, found it defective and ordered a replacement. We'll know shortly if the issue is resolved. Lucky me? You bet. But, only because of all of you.

You know, everyone learns differently. Some learn best by jumping in and doing. I envy you. For those of us, that first have to understand the basics and don't mind reading a bit; you'll love the threads in this forum. Special thanks to Super Moderators Sprint66, AncientDad, and LongDistranceRider - you are amazing, and someday I hope to meet and talk with you in person. Keep it simple; everyone and stay healthy and safe.
 

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I'm sure I can speak for all you've mentioned, and the many others here as well who regularly offer knowledge, advice and general help when I say "it's what we do here". I'm also quite sure those same people feel a great deal about it as I do... it gives a good feeling of satisfaction and enjoyment to be able to share some of what we've all accumulated over the decades of having our hands in this stuff. I'm glad to have been of some help, and the best part is knowing that you got your vintage bike on the road as a result. As HT member Rizingson's signature so aptly puts it - "the era is gone forever, fortunately the motorcycles remain" (y)
 

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Clymers are only good for use as toilet paper (especially relevant in this Corona virus situation).
Get yourself a factory manual.
 

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I think that's what he meant by saying "So, instead of buying Clymers and jumping in, I decided to read random posts and later specific threads that dealt with issues on my bike."
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Exactly! And for emphasis I did secure the factory manual, based on recommendations on many threads, before I started working on the bike. Thanks!
 

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A little less than a month ago, I brought home a 1975 CB200T and joined this excellent forum. You see, my bike purchase was to take me back to my earlier riding and tinkering days (on much larger bikes). I'm writing to thank you and share what I've learned with others in possibly similar circumstances.

Warning: I have not worked on a bike for over 20 years. What's so apparent to most of you - like intake versus exhaust side of the engine - I had to re-learn. So, instead of buying Clymers and jumping in, I decided to read random posts and later specific threads that dealt with issues on my bike. What I learned saved me hours of potential frustration. After (in order) changing the oil, charging the battery, new plugs, and caps, adjusting the cam chain, checking valve clearance, and checking point timing, I have a very smooth running bike. Discussions about the importance of battery health, difference in plugs and caps (resistor or not), and tools and tips on adjustments all made a difference.

With some success, I was ready to troubleshoot a non-working headlight and an always-on brake light. Again, I went back to reading the discussion threads. Luckily, I did because I was previously examining my wiring diagram and ready to inspect every possible potential trouble spot. I read a thread where Sprint66/Steve mentioned issues stemming from lousy kill/starter switches. So, I started by opening the switch and squirting in some WD40. My headlight works excellent now. On the brake light, just last night, I came across threads about bulbs, grounding, and such. It never occurred to me that I might just have a bad lamp. Jumping out of bed (really), I pulled out the bulb, found it defective and ordered a replacement. We'll know shortly if the issue is resolved. Lucky me? You bet. But, only because of all of you.

You know, everyone learns differently. Some learn best by jumping in and doing. I envy you. For those of us, that first have to understand the basics and don't mind reading a bit; you'll love the threads in this forum. Special thanks to Super Moderators Sprint66, AncientDad, and LongDistranceRider - you are amazing, and someday I hope to meet and talk with you in person. Keep it simple; everyone and stay healthy and safe.
I second that! This forum has been so helpful for me as a first-timer!! Thanks everyone!
 
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