Honda Twins banner

21 - 39 of 39 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
Discussion Starter #21
May 5, 2012:

Heeding the advice from others, I decided to talk to a tack shop about my interesting old leather saddlebags. I was told to remove loose dust and dirt with a slightly damp cloth, then treat with a good quality saddle soap.

That's when the fun began. I went online to learn about saddle soaps, and quickly realized that the saddle soap debates are like religious wars among the horse folk, akin to the motor oil debates the bikers have. I studied the comments but noticed that there was a clear favorite, a product called Leather New. So, I got a bottle for myself and treated the saddlebags.

I'm pleased. The bags still have that patina of age, but the saddle soap has enhanced their appearance and feel. These bags should look good on the CA95 when it goes back together.



Before:



After:

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
Discussion Starter #22
May 12, 2012:

When I was a kid, I loved to play in the sand. The sand was soothing and compliant, almost therapeutic. After a day of sand blasting motorcycle parts, I’m starting to reconsider my feelings for sand. Unless you like the taste of industrial silica sand and the droning of an air compressor, sand blasting is no fun.

The motorcycle frame is too large for a sand blasting cabinet, so I made a sand blasting “booth” by hanging a tarp under my deck. I simply sat inside the "booth" with the part, put on an old motorcycle helmet I got from a garage sale, and blasted away. After 15 to 20 minutes, I just lifted the tarp to pour the sand into a pile, scooped it up with a shovel and reloaded the blaster. Even with the helmet, the sand got in my hair, my ears, and places I’d rather not discuss.

I was hoping to finish this work in a single weekend, but I can see that it’ll take two weekends to sand blast all the parts.

My sand blasting "booth":



Before blasting:



Loose paint and rust are gone:



Primed and ready for wet sanding:

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
Discussion Starter #23
June 10, 2012:

After a few months of scrubbing with steel wool, sand blasting, filling, sanding, priming, and repeating those steps, the parts are ready for the paint shop. My goal is to have the parts back in time for my one week vacation at the beginning of July, when I'd like to start reassembling the bike. That would give the paint shop 3 full weeks, which I’m hoping is sufficient. I’ll soon find out. I’ll bring the parts to the painter tomorrow.

Otherwise, I have only a few tasks left to complete before reassembly can begin in July. I still have one more wheel to lace with new spokes. I’m still waiting for the wide white wall tires to arrive. I also have to clean some front suspension parts. I did manage to paint and reassemble the front foot bar and side stand assembly, pictured below. The rubber foot rests are new, replacing the original cracked and crumbled pieces. The foot bar and side stand were caked with decades of dirt and grease, hardened to a thick crust that I had to break away with a hammer before I could scrub the parts clean with steel wool.

Just more baby steps toward restoring this interesting little motorcycle.

Loading the parts into the Family Truckster:



Foot bar and side stand are ready:

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
Discussion Starter #24
With the Benly at the paint shop, I cleaned the few parts remaining that still needed attention.

The center stand was the most rusted part on the bike. I spent an hour at the wire wheel to remove the heaviest rust, then soaked the center stand in Metal Rescue to dissolve the remaining rust. I coated it with Valspar Tractor and Implement paint, which is super-durable, and as an added bonus, is non-toxic to livestock.



The front suspension gave me a few minutes of grief. When the crusty dirt and grease was removed, I realized that a grease fitting was missing from one side. These original grease fittings were pressed in, and unfortunately, were a bit smaller than modern grease fittings, so newer grease guns don’t fit the old fittings well. I decided to pull the remaining grease fitting, tap some metric threads into the holes, then screw in modern zerk fittings. After successfully tapping one hole, I broke the tap flush with second hole. With a bit of emergency ‘engineering’, I was able to back out the broken tap and preserve the threads. After cleaning the front suspension parts, I reassembled them with new grease fittings.





The rubber pads on the old passenger foot pegs were cracked in a few places, so I ordered replacement pegs. These weren’t as nice as the originals, and lacked the ‘Honda’ logo, but they’re clean looking. I won’t have passengers on this little bike anyway, but at least the foot pegs will look nice. The original Honda foot pegs will go into the archive box.



The kick starter and shifter lever also needed attention. There was pitting in the chrome, and the original rubber pads were in bad condition. The old rubber was cut away, then the levers were cleaned up with the wire wheel. This was enough to clean up the kick starter, but the shifter chrome was peeling away and looked bad. I decided to paint the shifter lever with aluminum engine paint to clean it up. Each lever got new rubber pads, and both look much better now.



I’m nearly ready to reassemble this old motorcycle. I just need to get the parts back from the painter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
Discussion Starter #25
OK, I decided to wrap up this thread by posting the pics of the final restoration. It seems there are more cafe or chopper conversions on this forum than straight-up restorations, but I thought I'd post the final pictures anyway since I posted the earlier pics.

I thought I'd share the before and after pics of my 1965 CA95 restoration project. With this project I really focused on the 'C95' general export model as my inspiration, so I added the wiring harness and turn signals from that model, in addition to the right-hand turn signal switch.

I obviously added some 'personalization', too. The 'Honda' logos on the side covers are aftermarket replicas of the logos on the '65 Honda S500 roadster car. The '150' badges are aftermarket, too. I took Spokes' idea and used self-adhesive door trim to add chrome accents to the fenders and side covers. I drilled and re-tapped threads for every grease fitting, so the grease fittings are modern metric fittings that actually fit a grease gun.

























 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,067 Posts
Nice restoration and great pics!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
23,233 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
You're About 6 months ahead of me, your notes and photos are greatly welcome! Now...how much of this can I foist off on my 9 year old sons? :mrgreen:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,372 Posts
A credit to you.Hope you have many hours of riding and as much enjoyment as you have had restoring. Regards Chris.
 
21 - 39 of 39 Posts
Top