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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I tried Google, but couldn't find anything that seemed applicable to my situation so far, so apologies if there's another thread with the answer - please feel free to scold me and point me to it. If not hopefully this will help others who made whatever mistake I made in the future. At least I hope the pics are useful to someone regardless.

My problem is that after I took my bike out after a clutch rebuild, it was shifting great for the first couple up and down shifts, and then it managed to get stuck in second gear. The shift lever simply isn't doing anything at all anymore, running or not. The long story of how it seems to have gotten that way is below.

I had my CM185T nearly road ready. I'd already ridden it back home from the shop after having new tires put on and a leaking crankshaft seal replaced on the left side. I noticed another leak on the kickstart seal, managed to replace that without any serious disassembly using the screw-in-the-seal method to pull it out without removing cover. Then I decided I needed to address the apparent clutch slipping before I told the girlfriend to go crazy. But aside from that the bike was running like a champ. So I get the cover off after a fight with a stuck screw, and after that I got some good disassembly pics as I took the clutch part (my own photos usually help me with reassembly more than any factory manual or my own bad memory).

https://photos.app.goo.gl/V6uQvfOtjJ6gCvoI3

The album images can be zoomed far more than any image I could include inline here so I won't post any in-line to clog up the thread. What happened is, the rebuild went smoothly overall, except that shortly after I removed the engine cover the spring on the end of the shifter had managed to pop free. I did my best to put it back into place although I can't recall if that was before or after that first picture was taken. I think it was as soon as the cover had come off it popped free, so I don't think I can trust that the image is 100% what the spring should look like before putting the cover back into place. My best guess is that I somehow installed that incorrectly when it popped off, before I had a chance to see what it should look like, and that somehow led it to managing to disconnect itself again somehow after a couple of shifts. The clutch still worked fine so I was able to get back to the garage in 2nd gear (thankfully I wasn't trying to take off from a near stop in 3rd!).

Is there anything else likely to have caused this? I have found some good pics of the gear shift linkage in the factory manual, but wondered if there is anything else I might have been more likely to screw up that would have caused this. I am mostly concerned that it was so easy to pop out of place in the first place, none of the manuals mention something like that happening.
 

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Everything I'm seeing in the photo's looks good. Have you tried shifting with the cover off and see what is happening? You'll need to turn the rear tire to get the gears moving to be able to shift.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I had not popped the cover back off yet, my next plan is to do just that but was hoping to get any other ideas before I got my hands dirty again. I was under the impression though I wouldn't need the tire off the ground just to see it going from 2 to N/1. I will borrow a rear swingarm stand though just in case, thanks. Too bad the Twinstar doesn't have the center stand like my 400.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Actually I ignored the Clymer's instructions to use sealant and a gasket, and used only the gasket (I think that's what the Factory manual mentioned anyway). Didn't want any sealant chunks getting into my engine, think that was what I had read might happen if using too much.
 

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OK, reason for asking is that a short while ago we had a 400 that was having shift problems that turned out to be caused by no gasket being used, just sealer. When using sealant it's just a thin smear to seal any surface deviations, it's not applied thick.
The transmission shifting dog ears aren't always aligned since the gears are floating on the shaft until engaged. Turning either the main or countershaft allows them to align which is the actual shift into gear.
 
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