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Discussion Starter #1
For the first time ever in the decades since I've owned bikes with tubeless tires, I discovered my V65 front tire's valve stem/core has a leak and it needs to be replaced. When pushed sideways a little to get the tire gauge on it, air escapes at the base where it goes through the rim, obviously cracked and from age I suppose. So, are they specific to bikes, or do any other valve stems work? I looked up the part number and found a few places selling them by Honda part number, but the prices vary wildly and the cheapest (apparently) OEM stem is from Partzilla for $6.81 while "fix_my_toys" on eBay wants $14.95. Do any generic valve stems work, or do I need to get a Honda part?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Already did the rear tire and wish I'd checked the stem while doing it. The front tire has a little uneven wear from the PO not staying after the pressure often enough (probably) but I wasn't going to change it until later - but now, obviously, with the tire off to replace the valve stem, I'll be doing it. So are they the same as car stems? I know they are shorter, but otherwise they do look similar
 

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I haven't compared to car stems. Bummer about redoing the rear. Tires are one of the least fun things... But at least with tubeless there's no tube to accidentally pinch!
 

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I don't remember specifics (actual millimeter sizes) but there are at least two different thickness of rim and two different diameters of holes. Generic will fit and work fine, as long as you get the right ones.You need to remove the old one to measure although generic for automobile alloy rims will probably be what you need Metal stems usually have a reversible nut to fit the larger diameter, just use it with spigot up if you have the small diameter.FRrom the link above, you can see the dual diameter type
https://www.amazon.com/TR-416-Outer...=1532919706&sr=8-4&keywords=metal+valve+stems

Because Scrader valves use special thread you will have to buy from somewhere (the taps were $112.00 last time I checked, die to match, $118.00), I wanted to make new fittings for some air shocks but scrapped the idea at that price
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks Jim - the color isn't a problem for me, the bike is in quite average condition after the PO used spray can black to touch up many areas that included stuff that shouldn't have been touched up, and it's not original paint either. I like the 90° aspect of them too, the stock stems are harder to get to with the gauge I have (which I like for its accuracy) because of the rotor size... and the newer bikes have even bigger rotors
 

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Just a thought. You can change the valve without removing the wheel from the bike. I was able to break the bead and squeeze the tire enough to replace the valve on a mag wheel recently.

.........Paul
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Yeah, maybe, but I'm guessing this tire is a little stiff - it was on there when I bought the bike close to 5 years ago. I'll know when I break the first side off the bead... :-? I hate doing tires
 

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Thanks Jim - the color isn't a problem for me, the bike is in quite average condition after the PO used spray can black to touch up many areas that included stuff that shouldn't have been touched up, and it's not original paint either. I like the 90° aspect of them too, the stock stems are harder to get to with the gauge I have (which I like for its accuracy) because of the rotor size... and the newer bikes have even bigger rotors
I am changing to 90 degree because of the same issue as you, too difficult to get the chuck on and over time bending to the side can cause cracks.
 

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Just a thought. You can change the valve without removing the wheel from the bike. I was able to break the bead and squeeze the tire enough to replace the valve on a mag wheel recently.

.........Paul
Get a big 'G' clamp and a piece of 1" thick pine. Place clamp over rim so screw end is contacting tyre bead, wood other side to prevent rim damage to rim, screw down til it pops bead, keep going so you have clearance to fit new stem (the core is the bitty inside stem) If your worried about screw end marking tyre sidewall, use a bottle cap on pressure pad.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Get a big 'G' clamp and a piece of 1" thick pine. Place clamp over rim so screw end is contacting tyre bead, wood other side to prevent rim damage to rim, screw down til it pops bead, keep going so you have clearance to fit new stem (the core is the bitty inside stem) If your worried about screw end marking tyre sidewall, use a bottle cap on pressure pad.
I have a bead breaker, PJ, so no worries there - and I do know what the core and stem are, I was just using enough terminology so everyone would know exactly what I was referring to. I've just never had to change one until now because my tubeless bikes previously were prior, and up to, 24 years ago with my last CBX so they never needed to be, they weren't as old as my V65 is now. I already have another front tire so since the wheel will be off and I have to break one side of the bead, I may as well just change it
 

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Yeah, I've been out of teaching long enough to forget you need to use incorrect terminology sometimes to get a point across. That's a heck of a good deal on angled stems. Never had a problem with them until they get 5~6 yrs old and even then only if used at higher speeds. The weight of angled section cause rubber to compress further when the end centrifuges towards rim. Semi-permanent fix is to fit an O-ring under lock nut around stem between stem and rim hole until next tyre change (which could be years in some cases) I did quite a few 30+ yrs ago, never had a problem (mostly on Yamaha XV535's to XV750~1000 rears, we sold a ton of them)
 

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Image-1.png.jpg

Here is a breakdown of the ones I bought.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Is your bead breaker a pair of 2x4 and a big jump?
:lol: no, I actually bought the cheapest HF one I could find. It's more intended for car rims I think, because it has a ledge spot for the rim to rest on that is too tall for a bike's hub in the center, so I have to block the rim with the 2x4... but it works. I'd have returned it but I know I'll use it again 2 or 3 times in the next decade
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks for all the info, guys... I'll probably be buying the 90° versions, that way I'll have one for the rear when the next tire goes on too - then 4 spares for the future with only one tubeless bike!
 

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Thanks for all the info, guys... I'll probably be buying the 90° versions, that way I'll have one for the rear when the next tire goes on too - then 4 spares for the future with only one tubeless bike!
PM me with your address and I'll send you 2, I only need 4.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
PM me with your address and I'll send you 2, I only need 4.
Jim - that's very nice of you. I really appreciate it, I'll PM you now. Honestly, one would be enough if you want to keep one as a spare for yourself, as the rear one is fine and I'm not planning to touch it for probably quite a while
 
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