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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I don't know what I'm doing so bear with me. When I got my motor back from the shop it was not "torqued". He told me to do what I had to do and bring it back. Well when I was ready to bring it back, I made a call and the number was disconected, I drove by and there was a for lease sing in the door. Poor guy was another victim of the times. So I'm left with some questions.
I borrowed two torque wrenches from a guy at work, one has a spinning end that allows you to turn to how many lbs you need and clicks when you reach the desired ft/lbs. The other one has a handle at the end with a pointer that tells you in inch lbs where your at. My question is which wrench should I use, and how to I get a precise measurement (not a whole number), and does the inch/lbs wrench equate to the ft/lb wrench (if not is there a formula that does)?

Here is what the Clymer's service/repair handbook tells me I need to torque down:
Cylinder head 2- 6mm bolts (near spark plugs) at 6.15-7.23 ft-lbs
Cylinder head cover 8- 13 mm cap nuts at 13-14.5 ft-lbs
Cam case 4 - philips head screws at 4.34-5.42 ft lbs


Thanks, I hope I didn't confuse anyone
 

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Since all your specs are in ft/lbs then use the "clicker" torque wrench since it's more accurate anyway. The torque wrench works just like a big ratchet but just lets you know when it's tight enough. I always set the wrench a little below the setting I want to achieve the make two passes, one at the lighter setting then I reset the wrench and do a final 'torque'. If you are doing the head bolts then follow the tightening pattern suggested in the manual and make two passes and you'll be good to go.

NE350 said:
I don't know what I'm doing so bear with me. When I got my motor back from the shop it was not "torqued". He told me to do what I had to do and bring it back. Well when I was ready to bring it back, I made a call and the number was disconected, I drove by and there was a for lease sing in the door. Poor guy was another victim of the times. So I'm left with some questions.
I borrowed two torque wrenches from a guy at work, one has a spinning end that allows you to turn to how many lbs you need and clicks when you reach the desired ft/lbs. The other one has a handle at the end with a pointer that tells you in inch lbs where your at. My question is which wrench should I use, and how to I get a precise measurement (not a whole number), and does the inch/lbs wrench equate to the ft/lb wrench (if not is there a formula that does)?

Here is what the Clymer's service/repair handbook tells me I need to torque down:
Cylinder head 2- 6mm bolts (near spark plugs) at 6.15-7.23 ft-lbs
Cylinder head cover 8- 13 mm cap nuts at 13-14.5 ft-lbs
Cam case 4 - philips head screws at 4.34-5.42 ft lbs


Thanks, I hope I didn't confuse anyone
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
WOW that was a record response.
So just so I get it. I'm talking about the cylinder heads which tells me it should be between 6.15-7.23. Should I just shoot for 7 since my wrench reads in whole numbers? I guess i'm a little thrown off about the .15 -.23?

Thanks, Matt
 

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NE350 said:
WOW that was a record response.
So just so I get it. I'm talking about the cylinder heads which tells me it should be between 6.15-7.23. Should I just shoot for 7 since my wrench reads in whole numbers? I guess i'm a little thrown off about the .15 -.23?

Thanks, Matt
Yes, I would shoot for 7 lbs. Unless you've got something with a digital readout you won't be able to get much more accuracy than that. BTW, the torque readings listed should be done 'dry'. Some people like to put a little oil or anti-seize on the threads (I do) so that might throw the readings off a little. A little dirt on the tread, temperature ect., will change things just a little so just shoot for the middle and you should be fine.

Heck, most torque wrenches are never calibrated once they leave the factory anyway so who really knows what your getting when you turn the handle to set it. Over the years the wrenches get dropped and slammed around, the springs get old and they get dirty, so don't sweat a couple of tenths on the setting.
 

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I agree with Mike mostly

Absolutely follow the diagram sequence and go around at least twice.

If there is no diagram start near the center and cross back and fourth from side to side working toward the outside.

Even tightening (same torque on each bolt) is more important than going to the high or low side of the recommended range.

Where I beg to differ is on which type of wrench is more accurate if used properly. The old beam and pointer is and remains more accurate (especialy when abused) than those that click, but you have to make sure you are looking straight down at the pointer, and grasp it in the center where the handle pivots.

Using a crowsfoot or anything that extends the length beyond the length of the wrench will give an inaccurate reading there is a simple formula for this, but it escapes at the moment.

Inch pounds translate directly to foot pounds 12inch pounds is one foot pound

Ernie
 

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I agree with Earnie, the beam type is more accurate, some people prefer them to check bolt stretch/spring back also. If you think about it, it makes perfect sense There are springs to stretch inside the click type, and many more moving parts to wear. That's why the click types have to be sent in to re calibrate them, most manufacturers recommend once a year if you use it regular. Just my .02

Brad
 
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