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Discussion Starter #1
I'm going to be replacing the dyno on my bike. The only info that I could find about the torque on the center bolt in the shop manual was 3.6 ft pounds. Does that sound right? Doesn't sound like much to me. Should I just crank it down or will that somehow mess up the crank? Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Woops! just realized this is in the wrong section of the forum. I have a 250. Also, the last sentence of the post sounded kind of funny. What I meant was, will it have any effect on the crankshaft if I just tighten the center bolt as much as possible?
 

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Sensei
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I presume you mean the dynamo rotor bolt......3.6 doesn't even sound tight enough for the 6mm bolts that hold the stator in/on.....
IIRC, the specs for those bolts were somewhere in the 15 to 18 ft/lbs range for 8mm bolts, and 25 to 32 for 10mm bolts...
(CB/CL 360 spec is 22 to 25, and it has a 10mm bolt)
The taper is actually what holds the rotor on, the bolt is just a means of seating it down.......
Jensen can probably provide the CORRECT specs.......My guess is a misplaced decimal, but I'm NOT sure.....
 

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Hi,

Rotor (to crankshaft)ft-lb23,50Nm31,9M8Bolt, Flanged

Torque only valid if dry (not lubricated). Only apply when the bolt (M8) is original (has a small dimple in bolt head) and in good shape. If not original, I recommend to replace, and not use a standard M8 bolt. Crank thread is hardened, and difficult the repair when damaged.

If you want to lubricated, use copper grease, and apply 50% to 70% of the torque in the table above.

Re-torque after a few heat cycles is recommended.

Jensen
 

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What's the difference between 23,5 ft/lbs and ft/lb ? Well, at least you corrected it, it is 32 Nm, no difference in ISO (I'm used to express torque in Nm).
 

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Sensei
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Jensen, NO difference between ft/lb and ft /lbs... Just common convention ....some say pound/feet is more accurate (weight or pressure at length)
The reason I "corrected" is that here (US) a comma (,) can indicate an option or range whereas the period or "full stop" (.) indicates a decimal annotation.....
I didn't want anyone applying 50 lbs of force when twenty-three and a half is the spec......
 

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Sorry, I wasn't aware of the convention, thanks !
 

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I know this is an old thread, but going through the same thing.... and I found that same 3.6 ft/lbs number posted by the OP. The CL Manual of old was woefully lacking on torque specs for hardware that may be removed for general servicing or repair. Frustrating and kind of hard to understand considering they seemed to go way overboard on providing other specs. that didn't seem as critical.

We forge on.
 
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