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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know that the Standard OEM sizes are FRONT-90/90-18 and REAR-100/90-18
Now, can I go wider safely (no rubbing) with these sizes FRONT-100/90-18 and REAR-110/90-18? Anyone running this setup? Thanks in advance for the info :geek:
 

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I heard you could get a 120 on there. Not sure.
 

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the way metric tire sizes work is the first # is height in millemeters second # is 90% of the height for the width so a 90/90 is 90mm high and 81mm wide, a 100/90 is 100mm/90mm doing a little math you can figure how much larger the tire will be, usually you can go up one size with no problem but fronts are more trouble due to the fender braces it will effect handling to some degree and the will also change the speedo reading (larger diameter tire will read slightly lower speed)
 

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What tire brand/size (and tread style) did you end up looking at? I'll be in the market for tires soon too, so I'm interested in seeing what options are out there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
IBrakeLate said:
What tire brand/size (and tread style) did you end up looking at? I'll be in the market for tires soon too, so I'm interested in seeing what options are out there.
I'm going with Kenda Sport Challenger 100/90-18 on front and 110/90-18 on rear. Hope this helps, "Dirtbag" runs these on this site. I like the modern tread design with the slight 10mm extra width over the OEM size. Mine is a daily commuter bike. Here's Dirtbag's sweet cafe bike with th Kenda tires. What a nice ride! :D
 

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Those are perfect. I think I'll get the same tire. Exactly what I'm looking for.
Thanks for the pic and info!

Anyone found a great place to get these tires from?
Kenda tires tubeless? Any problems fitting tubeless tires on (stock original) rims using inner tubes?

+1 on a good looking bike there
 

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IBrakeLate said:
Those are perfect. I think I'll get the same tire. Exactly what I'm looking for.
Thanks for the pic and info!

Anyone found a great place to get these tires from?
Kenda tires tubeless? Any problems fitting tubeless tires on (stock original) rims using inner tubes?

+1 on a good looking bike there
I'm running the same tires and sizes on a '75 CL360. Let me know if you would like pics for the clearance. They seem to be great lower-priced tires. I was impressed at how well they do in rain. Being 6-ply also helps them hold up a little longer.

The Kenda Challenger tires are tubeless, but I haven't had any trouble running them with stock rims and a tube.

Suggestions for mounting tires:

1) Use soapy water to lubricate the rims. I keep some in a spray bottle for easy application. The tire will slide over the rim much easier when it is wet. (trust me)

2) Buy a set of tire tools. These can be a real time-saver when mounting and removing tires. They also have rounded ends to help avoid puncturing the tube.

3) Test the tube for leaks before reusing it. Soapy water makes this very easy. You don't want to have to remove the tire again to repair or replace the tube.

4) Remove the valve core from the tube. This will make the tube easier to manipulate inside the tire. When airing the tube back up, insert the core, put in a little bit of air, enough to put pressure on the tube. Remove the core, let all of the air out, replace the core and inflate the tire. This helps prevent the tube from being twisted inside the tire.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Daniel, Thanks for the iinfo! I would love to see clearence pics, that would be helpful. I did do some rough measuring and it looks like it will workout fine. As fo my changing, I'm having a local vintage shop do the mounting and balancing for me($20/wheel) and I'm just going with new inner tubes at that time also.
 

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Rear Tire To Brake Support, Right Side http://imgur.com/W66Zk.jpg
Rear Tire To Swingarm, Right Side http://imgur.com/W66Zk.jpg
Chain Guard to Rear Tire, Left Side http://imgur.com/kIweI.jpg
Front Tire to Fender Brace, Right Side http://imgur.com/LNd7z.jpg
Front Tire to Fender Brace, Left Side http://imgur.com/zGlhZ.jpg
Front Tire to Fender Support, Right Side http://imgur.com/vYIDP.jpg
Front Tire to Fender Support, Left Side http://imgur.com/K9Zl1.jpg
Front Tire to Fender, Front http://imgur.com/nUr1R.jpg

All measurements are made in inches, so covert to whatever you would like them in. :D
 

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If you're replacing the tubes, you might as well spring the couple dollars for new rim strips as well, if you're not planning to already.
 

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dstmpt11 said:
Suggestions for mounting tires:

1) Use soapy water to lubricate the rims. I keep some in a spray bottle for easy application. The tire will slide over the rim much easier when it is wet. (trust me)

2) Buy a set of tire tools. These can be a real time-saver when mounting and removing tires. They also have rounded ends to help avoid puncturing the tube.

3) Test the tube for leaks before reusing it. Soapy water makes this very easy. You don't want to have to remove the tire again to repair or replace the tube.

4) Remove the valve core from the tube. This will make the tube easier to manipulate inside the tire. When airing the tube back up, insert the core, put in a little bit of air, enough to put pressure on the tube. Remove the core, let all of the air out, replace the core and inflate the tire. This helps prevent the tube from being twisted inside the tire.
Excellent, thank you :)
I also have a pair shims, which are the sides cut out of an orange juice container to use as protective sleeves between the rim and tools.
A a gallon milk jug could work too, but the orange juice ones are thicker and more durable.
 

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I know this thread's a bit old, but just in case there's still curiosity, my 1974 CB450 came to me with a 120/90 on the rear (stock) rim. It's a CS Hi-Max from, I assume, JC Whitney. There's plenty of room under the fender, even with a total of about 325 pounds combined between rider and passenger. The only tight spot's in the swingarm (and the chain guard, which is the same distance), where there's a tight pinky finger's width on each side. I've been watching it closely, since I knew it was so much bigger than stock, but I've personally got about 1500 miles on this setup without any problems.
For what it's worth, I've seen a few tire/rim size compatibility charts that say you shouldn't go beyond a 3.75" tire on a 1.85" rim but, again, so far so good on the 120.
 

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jayel said:
the way metric tire sizes work is the first # is height in millemeters second # is 90% of the height for the width so a 90/90 is 90mm high and 81mm wide, a 100/90 is 100mm/90mm doing a little math you can figure how much larger the tire will be, usually you can go up one size with no problem but fronts are more trouble due to the fender braces it will effect handling to some degree and the will also change the speedo reading (larger diameter tire will read slightly lower speed)

Old thread, I know, but I think that's exactly backwards.

The first number is the width, not the height. The second number is called the aspect ratio and it tells the height as a percentage of the width. Lower aspect ratio = height is a lower percentage of width which means lower profile. That's why the height of tire is smaller and smaller. Very low profile tires look like rubber bands stretched around the rim...

A 90/90 tire is 90mm wide and 90% of 90mm (81mm) tall. A 90/80 tire is still 90mm wide but only 80% of 90mm (72mm) tall.

So, stepping up to a 100/90 tire gives 10mm wider and 9mm taller.

Plus remember that the increase in width is TOTAL, meaning that each side will see half that increase. So, have a look at your particular bike and see if it can tolerate an additional 5mm on each side at the widest point. Since 5mm is less than 1/4", I suspect you'll have plenty of room on ANY bike.

Kirk
 

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the main issue with putting oversized tires on your bike is rim width. the tire manufactur will tell you what width rim any particular tire and size is rated for. putting oversized tires on too narrow rims will cause the tire casing to be pinched resulting in improper profile and reduced handling and performance. It may look cool having bigger tires but properly fitted narrow tires will out perform wider pinched tires (not so cool after all). before changing tire sizes check with the tire manufature to see what rim width they recommend. Properly fitted wider tires will offer better cornering traction. If that is your desire then get wider rims. I run Avon roadriders on my CB350; 90/90/18 front on a 18x2.15 rim as recommended by Avon. 110/80/18 rear on a 18x2.50 rim as recommended by Avon.
 

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Will a 140/90/18 fit on stock rim???? I extended the arm 6 inches and there is 2 inches of clearence on both side from side wall to arm. Will a CB400/500/750 rim fit?
 

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Looking to buy new tires for my CB360 and trying to run 100-90-18 front and 110-90-18 rear.. So I can buy any tire I want as long as I run a tube since the stock spokes are still on the bike.. Heard tubeless won't work on these wheels. Correct?
 
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