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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is there any way to accurately adjust timing without a timing light? I finally got my 350 running but it's definately not running 100%. For example, If i crank on it and then lay off the throttle it takes a while for the motor to get back to idle speed, back fires a little, and has zero power in fifth gear after 4,500-5,000 rpm's.

Any suggestions??

Thanks, Matt
 

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NE350 said:
Is there any way to accurately adjust timing without a timing light? I finally got my 350 running but it's definately not running 100%. For example, If i crank on it and then lay off the throttle it takes a while for the motor to get back to idle speed, back fires a little, and has zero power in fifth gear after 4,500-5,000 rpm's.

Any suggestions??

Thanks, Matt
You can use an OHM meter with the ignition off or a 12v test light with the ignition switch on, and "static" time the engine. I think the static timing method is what is spelled out in the service manual.

If you want a step by step method, let us know and we can help you out.
 

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Go here to read the very simple procedure - http://www.hondatwins.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=18&t=883

Sounds like your carbs aren't synched up, that's what usually causes it to rev back down slowly.
i suppose it might also be caused by an advancer with weak springs....

As far as the other, it's hard to say without knowing more about your bike....
Basic diagnostic info, like compression readings, a history, etc......
 

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Matt...In my experience, the 350's almost have to be done with a zenon strobe to get exactly right... On the other hand, the 450's are fine (usually) just carefully static timed....
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Bill, I followed those detailed instructions. The only thing I didn't use, (which looks like the most inportant) was the light. It seemed ok but it's not running great ,hense my new post. I also replaced the points and when it was running bad, I noticed the left contact wasn't moving very much if at all, so I put in the old point and it ran better. I was having trouble with setting the point gap, and adjusting the point plate. I didn't complete understand the thread when it talked about adjusting the plate. I wasn't sure when to do it or why I was doing it.
Anyway, I've never done timing before so, I just don't know if I'm doing it correctly.

Frustrated, Matt :x :?
 

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NE350 said:
Bill, I followed those detailed instructions. The only thing I didn't use, (which looks like the most inportant) was the light. It seemed ok but it's not running great ,hense my new post. I also replaced the points and when it was running bad, I noticed the left contact wasn't moving very much if at all, so I put in the old point and it ran better. I was having trouble with setting the point gap, and adjusting the point plate. I didn't complete understand the thread when it talked about adjusting the plate. I wasn't sure when to do it or why I was doing it.
Anyway, I've never done timing before so, I just don't know if I'm doing it correctly.

Frustrated, Matt :x :?
OK, Chris just went through the same thing.
It's brutally simple, more comlicated to explain than to do.
Don't try to overcomplicate it.

You do need the little light hooked up like that - when the points open, the current goes through the light and it glows (kill switch on RUN).
Set the left gap to 0.013" or so.
Rotate the entire point plate (the circular plate that the points are mounted to, it has two phillips screws on the rim that hold it in place) till the "LF" mark is dead on when the light comes on.
Move the right side gap to make the light come on at the "F" mark. Don't worry about how many thousandths the gap is right now.

That's it, really.

Now, Chris had a problem I hadn't seen before that I'll mention.
He had a beautiful new points plate with new points and all - the heads on the screws holding the points on were too big, they were actually preventing the points from opening more than about 0.010"-0.012" . Things didn't work out too well with that.
 

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If you're in a situation where you don't even have a little test light, you can still do it and get very close.

Just use a cigarette paper - put it between the points when they're closed and gently pull - the points should grip it tightly. Turn the alternator, and when the points open you'll be able to pull the paper out. Comes out real close to when the little light comes on, I've tested.

In the old days, rolling papers were common, not so much any more.
Buy a pack, if you can do so without arousing undue attention.
If not, field strip a regular ciggie and use the paper.
The thinner the better.........
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I think my new points were preventing them from opening as well. I got it running a little better so I went for aride today. Needless to say my brother had to pick me up on the side of the road as I started leaking oil from the points cover.

How bad is my problem? I haven't even removed the point plate to see behind it. I'll post pics when I do. Probably tomorrow.

Son of a Bitch!!!! :evil: :evil:
 

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No problem man, I just hope everything goes well for ya. It's pretty straight forward to replace that seal, and that should take care of your oil leak problem in that area anyway. You might need a good pick or something similar to remove the old seal. Don't be afraid to tear up the old one as long as you don't mar up the seal surface. I've never done it but others here suggest using a SMALL amount of silicone when re-installing, but as long as you keep that amount very small then I don't see any problem with it. I've replaced the shifter seal on my DRZ around 3 times now as it collects a lot of gunk and goes bad frequently.

Then again I'm no expert.. :lol: I'm just glad to be able to guide someone and actually contribute to this great site FOR ONCE.. ;)

GB :mrgreen:
 

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A test light doesn't cost much more than the pack of cigarette papers - might even be less than a pack of cigarettes these days. Connected between the hot side of the points and ground, the light goes on when the points open. You could even make one with some wire and a 12 volt bulb. An electronic timing strobe, however, is the only way to find out if your mechanical advance mechanism is working properly, if your timing advance starts at the correct motor speed and if your motor reaches maximum advance at the correct rpm.
 

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I made one out of two alligator clips two short pieces of wire and an small lightbulb. Just solder a wire to the threads and one to the little lead center at the base... attach the alligator clips and done... static timing light. That might be what the manual said to do... or possibly Bill told me to do that... IDR.
 
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