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Discussion Starter #1
Hey ya'all. So I was trying to figure out why my left cylinder was not firing and took out the plugs for inspection. The left plug is always kinda a pain to put in or take out. The right one works just like the book says. I can hand tighten it till it is almost all the way in then give it a 1/8 turn with a wrench. The left one however was always difficult. Well you can probably guess what happened next. When putting the spark plug back in i overtightened it and felt it strip. Now it doesn't make a tight seal and I can feel the air being pushed out of the cylinder around the spark plug. WTF do i do now? I'm assuming I will have to tap the hole out. But the logistics of it are beyond me. Will I have to take the cylinder covers off? To what size should I tap it? Are there heli coils that I should use instead?
 

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Sensei
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No, it's NOT a good thing......
It can be "heli-coiled", but the best way to do that is to remove the head....At this point, I'd suggest you go ahead and renew the entire "top-end" from the base gasket up..... new gaskets, de-carbon pistons, check valves, re-ring and hone (if necessary), etc.....
But you do end up with a "fresh" engine.....
 

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66sprint is right that's the best route

If you do try to do it with the head on be sure to follow the kits instructions closely

If it dosen't tell you to this one step you should make you add PUT SOME GREASE ON THE TAP this will help keep the cuttings from falling into the cylinder, but it' no guarantee.

here's an example of a repair kit - not sure this right size for you just shown for example



Most auto parts stores have them.[attachment=0:14d0by2p]plukit.jpg[/attachment:14d0by2p]
 

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Discussion Starter #4
That's what I was afraid of... Well I suppose there is no time like the present to learn how to do a top-end job. Gotta admit though I'm a lil nervous about completely disassembling this thing. What tools would you suggest for a first timer?
 

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Sensei
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We are here.... IF you hit a point where you are unsure, STOP and ask (pix help)..... Most of us have done an engine....Some of us professionally.....
It's NOT as scary as it seems it will be....:D
 

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Alfalfa said:
What tools would you suggest for a first timer?
A shop manual and maybe a torque wrench.

Go step by step. Read the whole procedure ahead of time in the evenings or something. It isn't rocket science and there aren't really any 'gotchas' along the way.

If you can, take LOTS of digital pictures along the way. They can be very helpful when going back together. Save all the various nuts & bolts, parts & assemblies in Sharpie-labeled Ziplock baggies.

Don't get in any hurry. If you get frustrated, or find yourself hurrying or making dumb mistakes, STOP!! and come back the next day.

Don't drink beer 'till your DONE for that day's work. :lol:

Good luck with it, and keep posting your progress.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
is a ring compressor really necessary for doing a top-end renewal? The clymer manual says i need to a two piece breakaway ring compressor when installing the pistons into the cylinder.
 

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Sensei
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I have almost always used my thumb-nails and extra caution, one ring at a time...Not sure I'd recommend that for a Newbie though...... Rings are expensive, and NOT plentiful... and easily broken in shear.... :?: :( Steve
 

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66Sprint said:
I have almost always used my thumb-nails and extra caution, one ring at a time...Not sure I'd recommend that for a Newbie though...... Rings are expensive, and NOT plentiful... and easily broken in shear.... :?: :( Steve
I use a chopstick myself.......
 

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Let me make that 3 for not using a ring compressor. I like popcicle stick or some other "soft", thin implement. The fingernail has always worked when doing two stroke motors.

You'll notice at the bottom of the cylinder there is a a slight taper (I think) that facilitates assembly. Or, maybe we used to taper those ourselves....I forget.
 

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tbpmusic said:
66Sprint said:
I have almost always used my thumb-nails and extra caution, one ring at a time...Not sure I'd recommend that for a Newbie though...... Rings are expensive, and NOT plentiful... and easily broken in shear.... :?: :( Steve
I use a chopstick myself.......
My two cents worth I've seen guys use hose clamps and zip ties with or without a piece of tin or plastic against the piston.

My personal opinoin is if you have an extra set of steady hands to hold / lower the cyclinder you should be able to pull it off with thumbnail or chopstick - just don't use anything hard or sharp like a screwdriver.

I you are nervous about it check around at places like farm and fleet or similar stores sometimes they have ring compressors designed for small engines (lawn mowers and such) at very reasonable prices under $20

Ernie
 

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oops forgot I would not recomend the hose clamp / zip tie route
 

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Discussion Starter #13
great to know. i'm just going to assume that you guys don't use a ring expander either then.
 

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.
 

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Alfalfa said:
great to know. i'm just going to assume that you guys don't use a ring expander either then.
I do use a ring plier (expander).
They're a cheap (less than $10) tool, and help me avoid scratching the piston while trying to get the ring on.
And I have broken rings in the past attempting to get them on without a tool.

Yes, it's true - I have indeed broken parts before.........
 

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Its pretty normal for left side to be messed up, the points cover sticks out and loads of people put plug at wrong angle then screw it in with ratchet because its a 'little tight'.
Probably best to fit plugs with outer cover removed.
Helicoiling isn't a big deal, even if you've never done it before.
It is best to remove head on CB's though because the valve seat inserts, valves or piston can get damaged if you helicoil at wrong angle (with head still on bike)
For re-fitting pistons, a piece of steel banding will work, cut it a bit longer than diameter of piston, bend ends out at 90 degrees, grip with a pliers to compress rings (I tend to cut strips out of whatever steel I have lying about)
PJ
 
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