Honda Twins banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,770 Posts
The GB's are what I wanted as a teenager. There was a 400 a 500 and a 250. The 400 and 500 will take an XL 650 engine as a bolt on mod
They've got nice little nods to Honda's history the indicators for example look like cb77
Here's my son sitting on a friend's GB 500
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,538 Posts
Cafe Racers started in the UK in the 60s. The idea was to drop a shilling into the jutebox and make a race to a point out of town and then get back before the song ran out. The apex of the cafe racers were the Tritons. This was a Norton Featherbed frame with a Triumph pre-unit engine. The Featherbed set the standard for the invention of the swing arm frame. Together with the Road Holder forks, Norton invented the modern motorcycle. This was in about 1952. This frame saw the use of Norton singes and later the twin cylinder engines. In those days the Triumph had the best performing engine and responded the best to tuning. It didn't take long for guys to figure the Triumph engine would fit right into a Featherbed. The ultimate Cafe Racer has a Triumph pre-unit engine slotted into a Norton Featherbed frame. You can still buy a new feather bed frame from Norton.

Land vehicle Vehicle Motorcycle Motor vehicle Car
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
725 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The term originated in the '60's in the UK but we used it to describe bikes where the performance had been improved and the riding position had been changed to reflect the race bikes of the day, ideally it had a fairing. Brit bikes have never been common in Canada, the '70's brought us poor boys Japanese bikes that were fast out of the box and could be easily upgraded to improve performance and handling. We didn't race between cafe's, there were none, we raced bikes and cars point to point and generally used business cards gathered as proof you had gone the distance.

Nobody today is hacking up vintage Brit bikes, ruining their function and calling them cafe racers. I was looking for a representative photo of a bike that someone in the '70's, like me, might have actually built up. Finding that photo was tough enough, the internet is full of garbage bikes. I find it annoying that there is the false belief, perpetuated by horrible motorcycles that my/our generation were so daft that we would do something like this.
Land vehicle Vehicle Motorcycle Motor vehicle Car
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
725 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I had a '75 Firebird, done to the nines. Took the starter off and moved the battery to the trunk for balance. Lost my licence for the glove box full of speeding tickets and after the suspension you had drive a test to get it back. I arrived at the DOT and parked nose out on a little slope. The testing guy came out, got in the car and went through his "you're a bad boy" spiel then said "let's go". I turned on the key, pushed in the clutch, rolled about a foot, dumped it and she fired up. The tester said "back it up you're not getting your licence back in this thing".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,085 Posts
I arrived at the DOT and parked nose out on a little slope. The testing guy came out, got in the car and went through his "you're a bad boy" spiel then said "let's go". I turned on the key, pushed in the clutch, rolled about a foot, dumped it and she fired up. The tester said "back it up you're not getting your licence back in this thing".
I fared better than that in 1974 when, after losing my license for a similar glut of tickets and points accumulated, I took my '69 GTX 440 with a bumpy cam and small aftermarket steering wheel to the Highway Patrol station to go through my driving test. While it had a current inspection sticker on the windshield prior to my first wife crashing the car into a power pole and wiping the right front and rear (while missing the door completely for some reason), it still had only 3 headlights and some damage when the testing guy came out to get in. He walked around the car, eyeballed the inspection sticker, got in and gave me a questioning look. He said "let's go" and I fired it up. He then gave me another, longer questioning look while listening to the engine idling rough and rumbling through the headers and full exhaust with old, tired turbo mufflers, then we set out on our test. He continued to give me a stink eye but we got through the test, and when we got back to the station the only thing he said was "you're supposed to drive with 2 hands on the wheel" to which I said "but this wheel is so small it's not necessary"... passed me anyway. Guess he felt bad for me in the crashed car I only got to own in nice condition for 4 days before my ex-wife ruined one side of it while I was too broke to get it fixed
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,837 Posts
My mom crashed dads 69' charger when I was 1 so they sold it for a family car. Love mopars even though I was a baby. They put goofy wheels on and make cars look silly too these days.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,538 Posts
I fared better than that in 1974 when, after losing my license for a similar glut of tickets and points accumulated, I took my '69 GTX 440 with a bumpy cam and small aftermarket steering wheel to the Highway Patrol station to go through my driving test. While it had a current inspection sticker on the windshield prior to my first wife crashing the car into a power pole and wiping the right front and rear (while missing the door completely for some reason), it still had only 3 headlights and some damage when the testing guy came out to get in. He walked around the car, eyeballed the inspection sticker, got in and gave me a questioning look. He said "let's go" and I fired it up. He then gave me another, longer questioning look while listening to the engine idling rough and rumbling through the headers and full exhaust with old, tired turbo mufflers, then we set out on our test. He continued to give me a stink eye but we got through the test, and when we got back to the station the only thing he said was "you're supposed to drive with 2 hands on the wheel" to which I said "but this wheel is so small it's not necessary"... passed me anyway. Guess he felt bad for me in the crashed car I only got to own in nice condition for 4 days before my ex-wife ruined one side of it while I was too broke to get it fixed
Things are different now, when my kid took his driving test in the family Subaru Outback (5 sp), the examiner got out of the car, looked at the score sheet and said he was a little slow in the parallel part and took 2 points off. She turned to me and said my son was a good driver. I guess 98 is a good score. Now he drives a '16 Mustang GT. 425HP and a 6 sp trans.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,085 Posts
Things are different now, when my kid took his driving test in the family Subaru Outback (5 sp), the examiner got out of the car, looked at the score sheet and said he was a little slow in the parallel part and took 2 points off. She turned to me and said my son was a good driver. I guess 98 is a good score. Now he drives a '16 Mustang GT. 425HP and a 6 sp trans.
Obviously, he had a good teacher. and so few people can drive a manual trans these days too... good for him
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top