Honda Twins banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
1965 CL77 #1028767/#1028772 1965 CL77 #1023716/#1023703
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I figured it was about time to get started on a log. I realized in April 2020 that since I couldn't go anywhere or do anything I should start on the project I had been planning for some time. Red was just sitting there waiting, so I cleaned a place in the barn and built a couple of tables/benches and started the disassembly.
IMG_0781.JPG


I had the bike for several years and had last ridden the previous fall. It was in great shape for the age and for the most part original as far as I could tell. With a lot of patience, a couple cans of PBblaster and time, I had nothing but parts and pieces. Of course, all were bagged and tagged along with pictures and a date/time item log.
314084


314085


The only serious issue I had was with disassembling the front forks. One of the bottom bolts would not come out and was stripped. I had the drill it and use an extractor to successfully remove it. Then came removal of the internal parts. The fork pistons would not budge. I got the bright idea of building a jig out of hard wood hoping that would work without damage. Unfortunately it only worked in my head.

314087


I ended up having to use on old brass hammer head and my mallet but in the end got them removed with little to no damage.

After much contemplation, the decision was made to have a professional rebuild the motor. Quite possibly one of the best decisions I have made.

On to finding someone to do the chroming, which where I live was no easy task. I found a quality professional about a three hour drive away that does projects like mine. Now the decision of paint versus powder coat. I settled on powder coat and found a similar business in the same area as the chromer that would do small projects. Color was decided and to remain the same coloring scheme but with an updated look. After a couple of months wait, I made a road trip and picked up my bright shiny parts. Time to begin the reassembly.

314088


During all of this I was working at the golf course and a move from the farm to a house on a lake, which was a no brainer but I lost my work space in the barn. Luckily, it has a three stall garage that is heated which is great as this mornings temp was -32 degrees. I probably would not have been working in the barn. It is cramped but works.

I am still waiting on my engine and should receive a package today that has a new seat cover which I can begin that process.

The only issues I have at this point is finding a document that has the needed torque values to begin tightening everything and finding the right rear motor mount. I know I have it but it must have gotten misplaced in the move.
 

·
Registered
1971 SL350 K1
Joined
·
221 Posts
The old CLs are good bikes. Probably will last
314089
another 50 years. I wish I could. You have bike parts everywhere. Looks just like my place.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
I figured it was about time to get started on a log. I realized in April 2020 that since I couldn't go anywhere or do anything I should start on the project I had been planning for some time. Red was just sitting there waiting, so I cleaned a place in the barn and built a couple of tables/benches and started the disassembly. View attachment 314083

I had the bike for several years and had last ridden the previous fall. It was in great shape for the age and for the most part original as far as I could tell. With a lot of patience, a couple cans of PBblaster and time, I had nothing but parts and pieces. Of course, all were bagged and tagged along with pictures and a date/time item log. View attachment 314084

View attachment 314085

The only serious issue I had was with disassembling the front forks. One of the bottom bolts would not come out and was stripped. I had the drill it and use an extractor to successfully remove it. Then came removal of the internal parts. The fork pistons would not budge. I got the bright idea of building a jig out of hard wood hoping that would work without damage. Unfortunately it only worked in my head.

View attachment 314087

I ended up having to use on old brass hammer head and my mallet but in the end got them removed with little to no damage.

After much contemplation, the decision was made to have a professional rebuild the motor. Quite possibly one of the best decisions I have made.

On to finding someone to do the chroming, which where I live was no easy task. I found a quality professional about a three hour drive away that does projects like mine. Now the decision of paint versus powder coat. I settled on powder coat and found a similar business in the same area as the chromer that would do small projects. Color was decided and to remain the same coloring scheme but with an updated look. After a couple of months wait, I made a road trip and picked up my bright shiny parts. Time to begin the reassembly.

View attachment 314088

During all of this I was working at the golf course and a move from the farm to a house on a lake, which was a no brainer but I lost my work space in the barn. Luckily, it has a three stall garage that is heated which is great as this mornings temp was -32 degrees. I probably would not have been working in the barn. It is cramped but works.

I am still waiting on my engine and should receive a package today that has a new seat cover which I can begin that process.

The only issues I have at this point is finding a document that has the needed torque values to begin tightening everything and finding the right rear motor mount. I know I have it but it must have gotten misplaced in the move.
I figured it was about time to get started on a log. I realized in April 2020 that since I couldn't go anywhere or do anything I should start on the project I had been planning for some time. Red was just sitting there waiting, so I cleaned a place in the barn and built a couple of tables/benches and started the disassembly. View attachment 314083

I had the bike for several years and had last ridden the previous fall. It was in great shape for the age and for the most part original as far as I could tell. With a lot of patience, a couple cans of PBblaster and time, I had nothing but parts and pieces. Of course, all were bagged and tagged along with pictures and a date/time item log. View attachment 314084

View attachment 314085

The only serious issue I had was with disassembling the front forks. One of the bottom bolts would not come out and was stripped. I had the drill it and use an extractor to successfully remove it. Then came removal of the internal parts. The fork pistons would not budge. I got the bright idea of building a jig out of hard wood hoping that would work without damage. Unfortunately it only worked in my head.

View attachment 314087

I ended up having to use on old brass hammer head and my mallet but in the end got them removed with little to no damage.

After much contemplation, the decision was made to have a professional rebuild the motor. Quite possibly one of the best decisions I have made.

On to finding someone to do the chroming, which where I live was no easy task. I found a quality professional about a three hour drive away that does projects like mine. Now the decision of paint versus powder coat. I settled on powder coat and found a similar business in the same area as the chromer that would do small projects. Color was decided and to remain the same coloring scheme but with an updated look. After a couple of months wait, I made a road trip and picked up my bright shiny parts. Time to begin the reassembly.

View attachment 314088

During all of this I was working at the golf course and a move from the farm to a house on a lake, which was a no brainer but I lost my work space in the barn. Luckily, it has a three stall garage that is heated which is great as this mornings temp was -32 degrees. I probably would not have been working in the barn. It is cramped but works.

I am still waiting on my engine and should receive a package today that has a new seat cover which I can begin that process.

The only issues I have at this point is finding a document that has the needed torque values to begin tightening everything and finding the right rear motor mount. I know I have it but it must have gotten misplaced in the move.
Hello Grayson, Like your project photos, keep showing us all what a great job you're doing. I hope to see photos of completed bike out in the sunshine. Any particular torque specs you need, I can try to post, but my computer skills are limited. I purchased a Scrambler in 1968, but after I was drafted it was stolen before I returned. After retirement in 2016 I bought a broken (kick starter) "parts bike", missing many items, so I'm aware of how much work you've done. You were wise to have a pro do your engine, hopefully one familiar with the unique issues of the 305s. Good Luck, HondaJohn.
I figured it was about time to get started on a log. I realized in April 2020 that since I couldn't go anywhere or do anything I should start on the project I had been planning for some time. Red was just sitting there waiting, so I cleaned a place in the barn and built a couple of tables/benches and started the disassembly. View attachment 314083

I had the bike for several years and had last ridden the previous fall. It was in great shape for the age and for the most part original as far as I could tell. With a lot of patience, a couple cans of PBblaster and time, I had nothing but parts and pieces. Of course, all were bagged and tagged along with pictures and a date/time item log. View attachment 314084

View attachment 314085

The only serious issue I had was with disassembling the front forks. One of the bottom bolts would not come out and was stripped. I had the drill it and use an extractor to successfully remove it. Then came removal of the internal parts. The fork pistons would not budge. I got the bright idea of building a jig out of hard wood hoping that would work without damage. Unfortunately it only worked in my head.

View attachment 314087

I ended up having to use on old brass hammer head and my mallet but in the end got them removed with little to no damage.

After much contemplation, the decision was made to have a professional rebuild the motor. Quite possibly one of the best decisions I have made.

On to finding someone to do the chroming, which where I live was no easy task. I found a quality professional about a three hour drive away that does projects like mine. Now the decision of paint versus powder coat. I settled on powder coat and found a similar business in the same area as the chromer that would do small projects. Color was decided and to remain the same coloring scheme but with an updated look. After a couple of months wait, I made a road trip and picked up my bright shiny parts. Time to begin the reassembly.

View attachment 314088

During all of this I was working at the golf course and a move from the farm to a house on a lake, which was a no brainer but I lost my work space in the barn. Luckily, it has a three stall garage that is heated which is great as this mornings temp was -32 degrees. I probably would not have been working in the barn. It is cramped but works.

I am still waiting on my engine and should receive a package today that has a new seat cover which I can begin that process.

The only issues I have at this point is finding a document that has the needed torque values to begin tightening everything and finding the right rear motor mount. I know I have it but it must have gotten misplaced in the move.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
1965 CL77 #1028767/#1028772 1965 CL77 #1023716/#1023703
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hello Grayson, Like your project photos, keep showing us all what a great job you're doing. I hope to see photos of completed bike out in the sunshine. Any particular torque specs you need, I can try to post, but my computer skills are limited. I purchased a Scrambler in 1968, but after I was drafted it was stolen before I returned. After retirement in 2016 I bought a broken (kick starter) "parts bike", missing many items, so I'm aware of how much work you've done. You were wise to have a pro do your engine, hopefully one familiar with the unique issues of the 305s. Good Luck, HondaJohn.
Thanks, I am attempting to make is as nice as possible and still using as many of the original parts as possible. That is one great looking bike you have there. It is a magnificent piece of work. I am curious about the two door Pontiac? in the background. I had a '65 and my dad got rid of it while I did my stint in the US Army (69-72). I did have some words for him at the time. I am looking for torques for triple tree/forks, front/back wheel and motor mounts. I would appreciate anything you have. Also, and recommendations as to the best manual. I have Bill Silver's, which is great but need more, and Clymer, almost worthless. FSM, Owner's, ?????
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
Thanks, I am attempting to make is as nice as possible and still using as many of the original parts as possible. That is one great looking bike you have there. It is a magnificent piece of work. I am curious about the two door Pontiac? in the background. I had a '65 and my dad got rid of it while I did my stint in the US Army (69-72). I did have some words for him at the time. I am looking for torques for triple tree/forks, front/back wheel and motor mounts. I would appreciate anything you have. Also, and recommendations as to the best manual. I have Bill Silver's, which is great but need more, and Clymer, almost worthless. FSM, Owner's, ?????
Hello Grayson, The white Pontiac is my 1968 Firebird, I've owned since 1977. Resto-mod, built to go fast, and stop faster. Bill Silver has 2 books that I got with the "parts bike" I won at ebay auction in 2016. Both books I have are rev. 1998. Is one of these what you have? The other may have what you need. After over a year of restoration, I entered my CL77 in the " Central Coast Classic Motorcycle Show" in San Luis Obispo Ca. sept. 2017, and won the Japanese class. Same bike also was seen in "Rider Magazine" photos for the Clement Salvadori "Retrospective" article in Jan. 2018 issue. I will try to find torque specs needed.
Anybody out there got 305 Scrambler torque specs?? The restoration books by Silver have much info, which of them do you NOT have? HondaJohn
 

Attachments

·
Registered
1965 CL77 #1028767/#1028772 1965 CL77 #1023716/#1023703
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hello Grayson, The white Pontiac is my 1968 Firebird, I've owned since 1977. Resto-mod, built to go fast, and stop faster. Bill Silver has 2 books that I got with the "parts bike" I won at ebay auction in 2016. Both books I have are rev. 1998. Is one of these what you have? The other may have what you need. After over a year of restoration, I entered my CL77 in the " Central Coast Classic Motorcycle Show" in San Luis Obispo Ca. sept. 2017, and won the Japanese class. Same bike also was seen in "Rider Magazine" photos for the Clement Salvadori "Retrospective" article in Jan. 2018 issue. I will try to find torque specs needed.
Anybody out there got 305 Scrambler torque specs?? The restoration books by Silver have much info, which of them do you NOT have? HondaJohn

Honda John, I knew that bike looked exceptional and I am very envious of the Firebird. I have my eye out for a 68 or 69 El Camino. One day perhaps. I have both of Bill Silvers books and they are well used but do not have the torque specs I need. Any help will be much appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
Honda John, I knew that bike looked exceptional and I am very envious of the Firebird. I have my eye out for a 68 or 69 El Camino. One day perhaps. I have both of Bill Silvers books and they are well used but do not have the torque specs I need. Any help will be much appreciated.
Hello Grayson, I also have a Chevy, a 2002, Camaro SS, the last year before the production halt. Had to go to Arizona to get an SS model without the removable "T" tops. I don't drive it much, still has factory tires, plenty of tread but 20 years old. Had an 89 IROC Camaro with "T" tops, been there, done that, never again.
I don't have a Honda FSM for CL77, but I have in the past used one of the dozen or so FSM to find a similar fastener on other models to find a torque spec. I will post what I can find, just keep in mind some are not CL77 specs, but are something close. HondaJohn
 

Attachments

·
Registered
1965 CL77 #1028767/#1028772 1965 CL77 #1023716/#1023703
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hello Grayson, I also have a Chevy, a 2002, Camaro SS, the last year before the production halt. Had to go to Arizona to get an SS model without the removable "T" tops. I don't drive it much, still has factory tires, plenty of tread but 20 years old. Had an 89 IROC Camaro with "T" tops, been there, done that, never again.
I don't have a Honda FSM for CL77, but I have in the past used one of the dozen or so FSM to find a similar fastener on other models to find a torque spec. I will post what I can find, just keep in mind some are not CL77 specs, but are something close. HondaJohn

Thanks HJ. Any information is good info and a great place to start. Great looking Camaro and I like the country and mountains around you.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top