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You mentioned about swapping over to the disc brake, CB350G. You're better off with the drum, that disc didn't work all that well. Want really good brakes then go to Vintage Brake and he can set you up Welcome to Vintage Brake!
 

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Discussion Starter #22
BTW, nice avatar :D is that an actual picture of you at a younger age? very cool
Thanks for the help ancientdad (nice name btw:lol:) and yep, that's me by the pool when I was little. Found the photo in my momes albums and figured it fit my user name:D.
 

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Thanks for the help ancientdad (nice name btw:lol:) and yep, that's me by the pool when I was little. Found the photo in my momes albums and figured it fit my user name:D.
It does - and you and I are at opposite ends of the life spectrum. My nickname came from the fact that I was 38 when my only child was born, and when she got a little older she realized her classmates' parents were all a fair amount younger than I was... one day she teasingly called me a dinosaur, and I thought up the name for a new email address not long afterward. Definitely a nice choice for your avatar... mine is currently a picture of my Dad at age 70, one of only a few I have of him where he was acting the fool :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Before powder coating I'd suggest building the bike so that any tabs you want to cut off are gone, any new tabs are welded on, that way you can avoid the same situation you're in with having painted the frame already. Read this thread https://www.hondatwins.net/forums/51-frame-suspension-steering/12903-welding-frame-strength-stiffness.html
Thanks for the great info longdistancerider. What I'm getting from that thread, correct me if I'm wrong, is that the seams of the frame (where the spot welds are) should be welded shut. I have put a photo below of where I belive the welds should be (highlighted in red).

After watching a Saturdays Wrench video on Youtube (the source of all great knowledge) I have seen how the process works and think I can do the angle grinding myself. I have a lot of experience with angle grinders so don't worry. Is it a smart idea to cut off the spot weld tabs in the rear of the frame though? Is this for a custom seat, or just for a clean look? I have photos below so you guys can get a better idea of what I'm saying.

And finally is it necessary to remover the tabs and do they have any beneficial purpose? (Image #3 below)

Seams to weld shut:
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The Saturday's Wrench way:
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Tabs:
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Discussion Starter #26
My nickname came from the fact that I was 38 when my only child was born, and when she got a little older she realized her classmates' parents were all a fair amount younger than I was... one day she teasingly called me a dinosaur, and I thought up the name for a new email address not long afterward. Definitely a nice choice for your avatar... mine is currently a picture of my Dad at age 70, one of only a few I have of him where he was acting the fool :lol:
First off let me say that your father is looking great for 70 years old, you have got the good motorcyclist genes. And what a coincidence, my parents had me at 44, and yes I am guilty of the dinosaur taunt. :lol:
 

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I removed the sidecover mount tabs and seat lock mount from my frame, it just feels more appropriate than having mounts there with no function. It can sometimes be difficult to get the frame surface smooth after cutting off tabs and other mounts, but the bare frame look afterward is worth it to me, looks cleaner
 

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Yes, the seams get welded. Even though it looks cleaner I would not cut the spot welded seams off and butt weld the frame back together. You need to figure out how/where/etc things will be mounted like the battery, regulator, key, etc. before powder. That's why I'm suggesting doing a basic build of the bike with all the equipment installed so you can make any adjustments, changes, welding, etc as needed. Once the assembly is finalized then get the PC done. Takes longer to build it twice but also gives you a more finished job when completed.
 

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It does - and you and I are at opposite ends of the life spectrum. My nickname came from the fact that I was 38 when my only child was born, and when she got a little older she realized her classmates' parents were all a fair amount younger than I was... one day she teasingly called me a dinosaur, and I thought up the name for a new email address not long afterward. Definitely a nice choice for your avatar... mine is currently a picture of my Dad at age 70, one of only a few I have of him where he was acting the fool :lol:
Oh yeah! I had my kids at 40 & 42.
Maybe I should think up a new name.
Kids always told us we were the oldest parents, to which I always replied " but the coolest"
I mean what other parent rides a 50 year old classic bike!!
 

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Late to the party but I had a couple thoughts.

Painting or powder coating is the very last thing you do. You should completely assemble the bike, once modified, make sure everything fits, all the systems work properly. It gives you the chance to make a plan for the order in which things need to be done and the method for that particular job, so you don't scratch your paint. Personally, $350 is better spent on running gear, paint never improved the riding characteristics of a motorcycle.

If you are planning on reselling the bike you might want to reconsider cutting parts off the frame. A cut frame eliminates many of your potential purchasers. Myself and likely many of the old farts here, whose peers have lots of disposable income, don't buy bikes with frames that are modified, especially by amateurs. If I come to buy your bike and you show me a parts list that shows quality suspension, tire, brake upgrades, chain, sprockets and wear parts replaced, the electrics sorted, then and only then I might throw in a few bucks for it being a powder coated frame, but not likely much. If all the mechanicals show quality parts and proper workmanship, I'll overlook some rust on the frame. $10 for a couple rattle cans, how many hours would it take you to earn $340? Whenever legally possible "Money goes in your pocket not theirs".
 

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Discussion Starter #33
Hello again,

Hope everybody had an enjoyable Thanksgiving and got to take some time off to spend with their family (and/or their project). I have recently received some goodies in the mail and made some negotiations on other parts that are yet to arrive.

FRAME LOOP:
I am going to first follow up on the frame loop I received from Triple Humph in the UK. Let me first say wow, what an amazing piece with outstanding craftsmanship. I have included some photos below of the loop and its glory. After opening up the shipping box I could immediately tell they went all out in perfecting the piece. After talking to Shaun (the maker) and giving him my desired specifications, I am amazed by the quality and attention to detail. As discussed, it has a 1" 14 SWG (2mm wall thickness) steel tube construction, a 20º upsweep, and measures seamlessly to the CB350's tail. When I took it out of the box I was also surprised to see that they had also welded on a crossbeam (that's what I call exceeding expectations). But most notable is the craftsmanship. You would think this had been milled from a CNC machine, that is how precise it is. The welds are breathtaking and will need no additional attention. Also included are the LED strip and two lugs for mounting. However, the brake light housing is my favourite part. It has been filled down smooth to the touch (unlike the rough cut Chinese ones from ebay) and also includes a backing for the LED strip. Overall I am very impressed with this purchase, for $60 it definitely beats Cognito Moto and Dime City Cycles. Again here is the link https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/CX-CB-GS-Cafe-Racer-Scrambler-Seat-Frame-Loop-Hoop-with-LED-Brake-Light-carrier/183425801788?ssPageName=STRK:MEBIDX:IT&_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649
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NEW REPRODUCTION FORK TUBES:
After some negotiations, I was able to steal a new set of new stock reproduction fork tubes on ebay for $100. These will replace the ones treated with Oxolic Acid (still not sure what happened there, pic below)
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COGNITO MOTO:
Yesterday I woke up to an email from Cognito Moto hyping their black friday sale. I normaly don't like to buy into that sort of stuff but when I saw the discounts (60%) I could not resist. Let me first note that I did alreay have intentions to purchase the following. Saving $150, my checkout consisted of a anaxized black flat top triple tree, and a deep bolt on electronics tray. I also purchased a indicator light mod for the top triple tree for $18 (notmaly $50) WHY NOT :D.

I have been recomended to a guy that builds old bikes for a living to help me with the frame (YES, I KNOW, I AM CUTTING THE FRAME). We will hopefully be able to weld the spot weld seams to add some more strength (Thanks Longdistiancerider) and get that beautiful loop on. I am also planning on buying a kickstand lug to weld on, as the stock one seems to get in the road of most rearsets. Don't worry you guys I am going to be doing some extensive planning to make sure parts will not interfere with each other (Kickstand, kickstart, exhaust, rear sets). I will put an update when I get closer to that.
 

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Negotiations... I love it! I remember doing some of that around your age, it was usually my Dad telling me to go ask my Mom and make promises to do chores of some sort. :D Good to see you back, young brother - and hope your Thanksgiving was good with your family too. Looking forward to more progress...
 

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You do know the world was built without CNC machines?
True - but in his world, there has never not been CNC, flat screens, cell phones, microwaves, electronic ignition, fuel injection, computers, high speed internet, Google, disco bikes, front wheel drive cars... and probably a ton of stuff I can't think of at the moment. Hey, the aliens who built Easter Island and the Pyramids may have had CNCs... :D all things relative to the generation I guess
 

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The reaction of the fork tubes is 100% normal.
They Oxalic Acid eats at the Iron Oxide and disolves it.
The yellow residue will simply wash off and the exposeed unchromed metal below can be painted with a primer to prevent future corrosion.

Honda never botherd to chrome under the fork ears so that portion of most all fork tubes is rusty.
Treat that area and once back under the fork ears it's not seen again.
 

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Discussion Starter #38
*Get ready for a long read*

And we are back. With school now out, I finally have some time to get things rolling again. On June first I was able to plan out how I was going to approach integrating in the rear cylindrical loop into the square frame. Improvising with what I had, I was able to cut and hammer out the rear top section of the frame to lock in the loop. The loop was then molded at each end to flow with the inner sides of the frame (Photo below). After being yelled at by my parents for keeping the neighbors up (with all of the hammering) I was able to tackle the underside the following day. Breaking the original spot welds, and hammering the lower flanges inward allowed the frame to enclose fully around the loop.

Later in the week, I took the frame down to our local welding shop. There the loop was welded in (Welds ground down as well), the top spine was welded along the seam, and a new kickstand lug was integrated in, just behind a front motor mount (A big thank you to Outobie for proper installation advice in another thread [Link below]). The following day after picking up the frame from the welder, the powder coater squeezed me in for an appointment. I brought along with me the top triple tree ordered from Cognito Moto for color reference. When comparing samples in the sunlight to the triple tree, I was amazed to find a color that matched exactly (And I mean exactly). This exact match seemed strange to me as the triple tree is anodized aluminum and the powder coat sample is of course powder coated steel. An explanation would be appreciated. Nevertheless, this match works out beautifully in my situation. Currently at the powder coater is the frame, swingarm, front and rear hubs, lower triple tree, motor mounting brackets and front suspension stanchion holder thingies; all of which will be painted in the same semi-gloss black.

So now that we are all caught up, here are my questions for the community:

1. I have been trying to replace all of the required rubber O-rings and copper crush washers. After spending 88¢ a piece at Napa Auto parts for O-rings that don’t even match the originals I have been researching the worlds most interesting topic, that is rubber O-ring. Seeing that the original O-rings do not match metric nor SAE samples (well, metric almost fit; could it be that they just stretched out over 40 years?) is it possible that Honda used JIS (Japanese Industrial Standard) O-rings in the 70s. Also doing the research I need to ask the question about what material is best for all-around use on these bikes. I am pretty sure that Honda just used Buna-N O-rings but when doing my research Viton and Fluorosilicon seemed very compelling (due to larger temperature ranges and chemical resistance). I would like to buy an assorted kit for both rubber O-rings and copper crush washers, so I can save money in the long term, but wanted to check in prior to purchasing so that I am buying what is the best for my bike.
-------- Where and what type of rubber O-rings and copper crush washers to purchase for this build? -------

2. The next step, while there is some downtime, with the majority of the larger parts (Clutter) is to figure out what rims and laces to purchase. I would do the work to restore the original rims, but it seems that they are rusted and dented beyond possible repair. As for the laces, I have been sanding and polishing the originals but when looking at my bleeding fingers and the cheap price tag of new ones, I am just about ready to throw out the emery paper. I will continue to work on them if I can be assured that I am not removing a protective layer of clear coat. I am worried that once they are put to use, they will rust all over again. As far as rims go I have seen sets ranging in price from $120 - $$$$. 4into1.com has a set with laces by “Rising Sun” for $160 however, I have been reading other threads exclaiming that “Buchanon’s” makes/sells the best rims. I am sure that they make great products but I have to wake up to my high school budget reality. ------ Rims to buy, and are the original laces worth saving? ------

3. When tearing down the front suspension, I had to deal with removing two lower front fork bolts that were for some reason phillips heads. When purchasing this part for the front suspension rebuild, I incorrectly bought 2x lower front fork bolts - 90116-383-721 - that only fit CL350s and CB350fs for the 1971 model year. Obviously, this bolt is to the K4 suspension type with the internal spring. I have even gone as far as to contact 4into1.com about this, however, they have shown me that Honda doesn't even provide a part number for this bolt “We don’t carry a similar bolt for the CB350K3. We’re not even sure what the part number is for this bolt as it does not appear in Honda’s part fiche for the K3 model year.” Hopefully, someone has gone through this roadblock before and could provide the bolts measurements. ------ Size of the lower front fork bolts for the CB350 K3 model type? (suspension without internal spring) ------


Thank you guys so much in advance,
Corban.

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https://www.hondatwins.net/forums/51-frame-suspension-steering/31233-side-stand-mounting-lug.html
 

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Discussion Starter #40
Just curious why you don't use the original kickstand location?
Nova, it will interfere with the usage of the new rear-sets (Café style shifters). It also eliminates the original cross bracket saving a little bit of weight (however takes away from rigidity). The link above, in my previous post, goes into more detail.
 
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