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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I'm a newbie ! :)

I have been reading 450 forums for awhile.
I have a 72 CB & a 73 CL.
Both have been sitting for years & are in what I would call semi rough condition.
I have a good title for the CL but the guy I bought the CB from provided a title for a CB350. :cry:
[A friend in another state got the CB for me. I went & picked it up . That is when I discovered the wrong title]

Since I like the CB better then the CL I am going to transfer parts & make a CB out of the CL.
I don't have the original exhaust for the CL or I'd probably leave it as is. It has a 2 in to 1 exhaust.

Anyhow, I will be reading & asking questions as I go !
 

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welcome along, I am new to the forum too, but not new to fixing bikes, just yesterday I was talking to a mate and we worked out in the last 20 years we have put more than 100 bikes back on the road, some were total writeoffs. Every bike is different, even if they are the same make and model. Most of the time is is good fun, enjoy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm no "greenhorn" when it comes to bikes.

I started many years ago on a 125 Vespa.
Went to a CB350, then 500Triumph, then 650 Triumph, then a 750 Trident, then a 75 Superglide.

I quit riding for a few years & have had the 450's for several years so I decided to resurect one just to putt around on.

I have no intention of trying to do a full factory restoration.

I plan to do it the way I want it. ;)

It will be close to original though.

The first step is to get at least 1 running so I know what I'm working with.

After that I will take it down to the bare frame & start from there.
 

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"I started many years ago on a 125 Vespa.
Went to a CB350, then 500Triumph, then 650 Triumph, then a 750 Trident, then a 75 Superglide."

Isn't it funny how many of us follow the same motorcycle path? When you're a kid, you start with something small that you can afford. Then you always seem to want a bigger, and/or faster bike. Eventually, nostalgia seems to kick in and we want that smaller bike that we had "back in the day". Then we remember how much fun the smaller bikes were. Of course, in the early '70s, 350's and 450's were considered big bikes.
 

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You have to click on the "Img" box and put the URL in between the brackets.....
I re-did it for you.....
 

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in my real early life, like 5 years old, my father had a Rabbit Scooter so riding on the back of that was my introduction to bikes. A little later on when I was about 10 my older sister had a Suzuki F70 step thru and that bike became my first ride by myself bike, in my very early teens, like 13, I somehow got a BSA, I don't even know what cc but it was probably a Bantam although I like to dream it was a 500 single ;) but i don't think so, I would have been to small to ride it, this bike my mates and I would ride up the jetty and see how close we could stop without going over the end.

My first street legal bike was in 1969, a Honda S90 sport, in that year I also bought a Triumph 650 T110, paid $75.00 for it. To this day I still do not know what happened to it. I traded the S90 in 1970 on a new CB350 twin, in 1972 I bought a Ducati 450 Desmo Silver Shotgun.
Here is a pic,



http://www.netbikes.com.au/cycleauction ... hotgun.jpg
Wish I still had it.

Since then I have had countless bikes, still love them and will probably keep buying them till I can't.
 

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Welcome to the forum, Joe and Chris. You guys have both been involved with siome really cool bikes along your way! I will be very interested to hear how your Honda 450 projects go in comparison to how other projects have gone.

Mike V.
 

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thanks Mike, like Joe I will not be restoring my bomber, it is a little shabby looking but goes well so it is a tidy up and use job for now, I may restore it down the track.
Mine is a 65 Bomber and you never see those on the road here.

Here is another of my bikes.


This is a 66 Suzuki T20, it was a race bike with a holed piston when I got it. I put it back into road use. I use it frequently.

 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
So, I started the project on the CB today.
Removed the seat & tank, fired up the compressor & blew all the trash off of it.
Pulled the plugs, squirted some oil in each cylinder, & kicked it though a couple of times to coat the bores.
Dumped the old [orange] gas out of the tank.
Went & got rust remover [in the tank now] & tank sealer .

I stopped at the Honda dealer & asked if by chance they had any old NOS parts for it.
The guy was still laughing when I left. :(

I can see right now that working on a 72 CB450 in a small western Kentucky town is going to be a challange .
 

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fairjoeblue said:
I stopped at the Honda dealer & asked if by chance they had any old NOS parts for it.
The guy was still laughing when I left. :(

I can see right now that working on a 72 CB450 in a small western Kentucky town is going to be a challange .
Hang in there, you have lots of knowledge here on the site and many vendors and Ebay online. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I'm not worried.
As long as the internet works I'll be able to get what I need or want.
It may just take a little longer :cry:

Tomorrow I'm going to get a gallon can of carb cleaner with the basket in it & see what I can do with the carbs.
I was happy to find that the petcock still works & isn't plugged.
That's a good sign. ;)
 

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Hey Joe,

I am curious as to what chemicals and techniques you are using to de-rust, prepare and seal the gas tank. Watchya usin'?

Mike V.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
The inside of the tank wasn't really bad, just some "freckle" rust on the top of the tunnel & upper tank.
It still had 20 yr. old [used to be] gas in it that was still liquid.
The fuel valve wasn't even clogged .
I dumped the old stuff out, put a hose on the crossover nipples, put the gas valve back on & put "Purple Power De-Ruster" in it.
The instructions said it works in an hour but I let it go for a couple.
Emptied the tank & flushed with water.
The de-ruster lable says it leaves a "powder coating" that needs to be wiped off.
[The de-ruster is actually for car sheet metal to prepare it for welding.]

I then removed the hose & gas valve , opened the cap, & set it in the sun to dry.
[Sat over night & still isn't completely dry as it's chilly here. If it isn't dry by tonight I will put it in something with a drop light turned on for heat]

Yes, I am aware that it probably started oxidizing as soon as I emptied the water.

The cleaning was more to remove sludge, if there was any.


I have a quart of Red Kote gas tank sealer/liner I'm going to use in it.
From what I have read online the red kote is supposed to be better then Kreem.
The trick with the red kote is the tank has to be completely dry.

The red kote is also just a precaution.

I've used worse tanks with no sealer ! :lol:
 

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Thnaks for the rundown Joe. I was curious because I have a couple of rusty tanks that I will have to deal with eventually. But these range from badly to horribly rusted inside.
 

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I'm an old hand at de-funkifying tanks, RedKote too (great stuff).
I generally use MSR at 50% dilution, gets every hint of rust.
Water rinse , blast with air compressor for a while, then a couple of quick rinses with acetone. The tank has no water in it now.
Immediately Red-Kote. I usually dilute the RedKote with some acetone first. The amount varies with the batch and conditions. It's a little too thick for me straight out of the can.

To avoid problems at the petcock and crossover tubes area, I drain the RedKote and let the tank dry upside down, so all drainage is towards the gas cap. A couple of squirts of air into the crossover tubes while the stuff sets up makes sure they stay clear.

Try not to get RedKote anywhere, as you have to use acetone to get it off, which also is death to paint of any kind.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I plan on about the same redkote method but I was going to put wires in the crossover tubes ,up in to the tank, & pull them out after a few while the tank is upside down.
I read an article that advised against compressed air while drying as it may cause bubbles in the redkote.

I'll have to try & get some acetone .

Being in Hooterville if the auto parts, Walmart, Lowes, or Tractor Supply doesn't have it I'm out of luck !

I'm a big city guy living in a small southern "city" & i"ve had a hard time adjusting to the limited shopping. :cry:

I'll get it done though !

I made a deal with a guy I know that has a pretty decent [private] shop to work on my bikes in his place so if all goes right I'll be working inside next month.
I only have a small shed & , to be honest, I'm afraid to even fire up the mig in it.
I have visions of the shed [all wood] firing up also. :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
" Thnaks for the rundown Joe. I was curious because I have a couple of rusty tanks that I will have to deal with eventually. But these range from badly to horribly rusted inside. "

Start by putting some diesel fuel & a handfull of decent size hex nuts in it.
Shake like crazy while turning.
That will knock the worst of the rust loose.
Empty & flush.

If you can find it "Evapo-Rust Super Safe Rust Remover" will take it down to bare metal but if you have any weak spots you might spring some leaks. :eek:

They sell it at "tractor Supply" here,

http://www.tractorsupply.com/vehicl...-trade-super-safe-rust-remover-1-gal--1340932

Mine wasn't bad enough for something that potent.
 
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