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Hi all

My CL350 is now starting, running and riding pretty well.

Next job is to sort the noisy starter clutch.

The rollers, springs and caps are cheap and easy to obtain but I could do with an idiots guide (pref video) to
get to grips with exactly how to go about changing everything.

Is there anything out there for me to see?

Thanks

Tim
 

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I'm working a 73 CL right now. Will be doing the starter clutch as the final mechanical. Pretty straight forward. Pull the left side center cover, pull the stator flywheel thingie, and replace rollers, springs, and caps. There are videos out there.

Simple operation after you muscle the bits loose from the shaft.
 

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CB350 is way different from the 750. Do not disassemble the rotor, do not remove the screws that are staked.

Make sure you get all the broken pieces of spring out of the holes. Use all new pieces whether the used ones look good or not.
 

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Good on the clarification, Boomer. The spring/cap/roller configure is same and all that needs replacing assuming no damage otherwise. Not a complicated device or operation for anyone with some wrenching behind them.

Is there any data on OEM vs any other eBay source for parts as far as quality?
 

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Boomer - How do you plan to change the rollers, springs & caps if you do not remove the back plate from the rotor?

All of those parts are captive behind the plate.

When I rebuilt the starter clutch on my 350 I had to remove the staked Screws and backing plate to get access to swap out the worn parts.

Product Auto part Rotor Disc brake
Metal Copper Brass Fastener Auto part
 

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Yendor I have never taken the rotor screws out on any Honda motor I've replaced these parts on.

Usually the parts fall out if the springs are broken. Spring in, cap on, hold down with a small screwdriver, push roller in. 10 second job.

On the bigger engines the rollers get flat spots but the 350's seem to like to break springs and caps.
 

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Yendor I have never taken the rotor screws out on any Honda motor I've replaced these parts on.

Usually the parts fall out if the springs are broken. Spring in, cap on, hold down with a small screwdriver, push roller in. 10 second job.

On the bigger engines the rollers get flat spots but the 350's seem to like to break springs and caps.
This is exactly how I found them on mine as well, no need to take it apart. It can be a bit fiddly to get back in, I put the spring in the cap and then used needle nose pliers to slot it in the hole. Keep it there with a small screwdriver until you can get the roller in which will hold it all in place.
 

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Interesting:
I've always just opened them up replaced the parts and put them back.
I give the screws a Staking with a small cold Chisel and use Blue Locktite.

I will have to give that a try on the next one that needs replacement.

I've got (2) motors in the garage waiting so I'm sure one will need them.
 

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Many times the starter clutch housing is cracked and the only way to see that is to remove the staked screws. Good idea to check before putting it back together and finding out it still makes noise or doesn't work right (dont ask me how I know....)
 

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I took it apart the same way I've seen others do and how I thought I should. Not a vintage bike expert by any means. Biggest hurdle is pulling the beast loose to get at it. The rear axle is a good fit or you could buy the actual puller or a 16mmx1.5 (?) bolt as mentioned in these forums.

I felt better about seeing any possible wear/damage internally as I had no idea what the bike had endured before it got to me. 6 of one, half dozen and a judgement call for the individual on separating the clutch.

After the repair parts arrive and are installed this one goes back to my buddy and will hopefully work well and for a long time. Been a great memory blast and stuff. Even though all my bikes were Suzuki or Yamadawg.
 

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New clutch bits are in. I verified it can be done without removing back plate and just installing springs, caps, and rollers with the help of a small screwdriver or preferably plastic stick. Avoid any damage to cap face.

Works great and making final runs and testing easier.
 

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I took it apart the same way I've seen others do and how I thought I should. Not a vintage bike expert by any means. Biggest hurdle is pulling the beast loose to get at it. The rear axle is a good fit or you could buy the actual puller or a 16mmx1.5 (?) bolt as mentioned in these forums.
I'm currently working through this on my 175, how did you loosen the initial bolt on the outside of the clutch? I've got my m16x1.5 bolt ready to go but I can't seem to even get that initial bolt to budge (just turns the engine).
 

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I'm currently working through this on my 175, how did you loosen the initial bolt on the outside of the clutch? I've got my m16x1.5 bolt ready to go but I can't seem to even get that initial bolt to budge (just turns the engine).
I may get flamed but since I have an electric 1/2 impact, I just hit it with that for the initial break loose. The rest was hand tools and as mentioned the strap type wrench to hold the rotor in place.

To be clear, I do not recommend use of impact here but it was what it was at the time.
 

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I have actually had other people telling me to use an electric impact driver in other threads. My manual impact driver isn't working. I don't want to buy an electric one for just this job, either. And I do have holes in the rotor but they're nowhere near deep enough to get purchase and stop the spinning.
 
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