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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How important is it for these screw tabs to line up?

Ive tried each screw in each hole and only one comes close to lining up with the original mark.

They’ve only been hand tightened with my impact driver but even if I were to use the impact driver I don’t think it would get them any closer.

Also, this isn’t the original starter clutch, I bought this one second hand off of Doode to replace my broken original. Would the fact it’s not the original make this occur?

Thanks!
Logan





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They should line up better than that. you're a quarter turn off. Maybe you're over tightening?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
They should line up better than that. you're a quarter turn off. Maybe you're over tightening?
Jakec,
If I line up the tabs, the screws are definitely too loose. These are just tightened down by hand to where the screw stops moving.


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They are STAKE Marks and slots are for the pressed out metal to reside in.

Once they are fully tight just take a small Cold Chisel with a flattened end so it makes a flat stake mark and give it a whack with a hammer.

The staking acts like a lock nut to prevent them from backing out too easily.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I put the old NFG starter clutch on and the screws lined up better than they did on the replacement.

I did notice how the screws kind of locked or popped into place as I screwed them past the tabs on the channels.

The replacement doesn’t have those tabs from what I can see.

If I just make sure they’re nice and tight would that be okay?


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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
They are STAKE Marks and slots are for the pressed out metal to reside in.

Once they are fully tight just take a small Cold Chisel with a flattened end so it makes a flat stake mark and give it a whack with a hammer.

The staking acts like a lock nut to prevent them from backing out too easily.
Yendor, I was in the middle of typing when you replied.

I noticed a few differences between the two pieces posted below your reply.


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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
They are STAKE Marks and slots are for the pressed out metal to reside in.

Once they are fully tight just take a small Cold Chisel with a flattened end so it makes a flat stake mark and give it a whack with a hammer.

The staking acts like a lock nut to prevent them from backing out too easily.
So, any screw any hole, then make new marks basically with a chisel after I have them retightened, regardless of the previous mark?


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If you can get them to line up by swapping screws that would not be a bad idea, but still give them a stake as removing them will push up the stake mark and make it less effective.

If they don't line up no big deal just stake them into place.

You are only pushing down the edge of the screw head into the slot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
If you can get them to line up by swapping screws that would not be a bad idea, but still give them a stake as removing them will push up the stake mark and make it less effective.

If they don't line up no big deal just stake them into place.

You are only pushing down the edge of the screw head into the slot.
Ok great! That makes a lot of sense. I was able to get one to line up but the other 2 screws will both get new stake marks.

Thanks again!
Logan


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Yes - As always there is more than one way to skin a cat.

The Factory method was staking and the OP's question was: WHAT ARE THE SLOTS FOR?
 

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And one more thought, based on one of his replies above - lining up the stake marks to the original spots does not assure they won't come loose in the future. Staking something into a notch or groove works the time it is done, but the act of unscrewing it and putting it back in again reduces the friction of the original stake mark. If no Loctite is used, be sure to re-stake the screw again to be absolutely sure
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I got the starter clutch assembly and rotor back on yesterday, decided that both methods couldn’t hurt. Used a fine amount of blue loctite and also staked new marks on all the screw heads. I feel pretty good about it. Thanks everyone!


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