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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Today's Sunday Morning Ride (SMR) was a route I haven't taken for at least a year. I've dubbed it "Harrison Under a Hundred" because it's a circuit to and from Harrison Lake (aka, Harrison Hot Springs) and I deliberately take the scenic route... as in no freeways, which guarantees that all posted speed limits are under 100 km/h.

*Not saying that I don't ride 100 on some stretches, just this route is marked with rural and highway but not freeway speeds.

Anyways, the first major leg of the circuit is Eastbound, along the North bank of the Fraser River as it winds around the base of a few mountains. You continue to push "upstream" until you reach the inland end of the Fraser Valley. As mentioned above, the end of the first leg is Harrison Lake, which is exactly 75 miles away from my home when you travel this particular circuitous route.

Here are some photos from the valley side of Harrison Lake...

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My CB500T parked along the lakefront...

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...and parked in dedicated motorcycle stalls outside a loverly breakifast establishmentism...

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Summarizing the point of this trip: take the longest, windiest route possible to a quaint resort town and have an espresso by the lake before the tourists begin arriving in droves...

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Here's a panorama shot of my bike on Esplanade Road, which in reality is dead-straight but dramatically skewed by the pano feature on my phone...

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Now the route home is completely different by design. It's meant to be a circuit or a full loop skirting the perimeter of the Fraser Valley.

When you depart Harrison fully re-caffeinated, you travel due South until you reach the mountains on the southern side of the valley and those mountains will guide you Westbound, funnelling you back towards the Pacific Ocean. And for the first third of the way West/home, those mountains separate British Columbia and Washington State. It's a natural, imposing and impenetrable border for any motorist. But as you continue Westbound, those mountains abruptly end and the valley spills open into incredibly flat and fertile landscape that drains all the way down to Seattle.

And that's kinda my hook and inspiration for this posting... at some point the "Southern" mountains cease and a motorist may find themselves speeding down an interesting stretch of asphalt called 0 Ave (yes, "zero avenue").

0 Ave facing East...

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0 Ave facing West...

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My bike on the North shoulder of 0 Ave...

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"But, Dave. I see two roads? Two does not equal zero!"

Exactly, the road I'm standing on is 0 Ave. On the opposite shoulder is a narrow patch of grass and on the other side of that grass is what some locals call "A Rd." I believe it's officially named Benson Rd., but most folks around here call it "A Rd" or "A Ave" so that it thematically mirrors "0 Ave" because... 0 Ave is in Canada and A Rd is in the United States... and that thin strip of grass between is The Border.

Here's a shot facing due South across 0 Ave and A Rd...

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It wouldn't take much physical effort to run across five feet of grass, but it would require a fair bit of chutzpah to take those first 2-3 steps!

If you look back at the 0 Ave photo with my bike in the foreground, take a close look at my right mirror--it's pointing at a silver pylon which is an official border marker erected by surveyors. All along 0 Ave, there are one of these pylons every 50 or so meters. And when you get closer to my home, there is no longer an A Rd, it ends and is replaced by a string of American backyards. Literally, there is a stretch of almost a mile where people live in nice houses and their backyards extend right up to these silver pylons. Most don't even have fences and when they turn on their sprinklers to water their lawns, some of that water irrigates Canadian soil.

Some other day I'll stop and take a photo to show y'all how "neighborly and neighbourly" some Americans and Canadians get to be every single day. The only things separating several Canadian front yards from a bunch of American backyards is 0 Ave and a whole lot of faith. It's fascinating, really. To the uninitiated, it looks like a semi-rural suburb and not at all like two distinct countries.

I'm actually kicking myself for not stopping along that stretch for a couple of quick pics. Maybe next weekend I'll head back over and post some updates. It's only about 15 minutes from my home.

Okay, now to finish this post off with an interesting coincidence about the "Harrison Under a Hundred" circuit... as I said earlier, the entire road trip functions as a loop skirting the length and width of the illustrious Fraser Valley. The first North/East leg to Harrison is exactly 75 miles long from my driveway. And the second South/West leg home is, you guessed it, exactly 75 miles long. For each leg, my tripmeter is consistently greater than 74 and less than 76.

I'll never get tired of that coinkidink. And it has evolved into a secondary goal for this particular SMR--hit that 75-mile nail on the head!

Okay, that's about it for now. Thank you for reading this far. Hope everyone out there had a great Sunday doing things they absolutely love with the people they care about most in this world.

Goodnight!
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
For most of you who are not familiar with the Vancouver area and the Fraser Valley, may I present this Google map that illustrates the "Harrison Under a Hundred" loop...

Harrison Under a Hundred Route.jpg

I start and end near the bottom left corner of the route, not far from White Rock beach.
 

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Thanks for the geographic and cultural lesson. I thought that was neat, and that Harrison loop for an SMR looks amazing.
My type of riding for when I take my 72 CB450 out and about where I live.
You have a fine example of a CB500T!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the geographic and cultural lesson. I thought that was neat, and that Harrison loop for an SMR looks amazing.
My type of riding for when I take my 72 CB450 out and about where I live.
You have a fine example of a CB500T!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I have 2 young sons who are quite a handful so I try to limit my four-hour SMRs to about once per month. (Can’t be too greedy with my me-time!)

In general, SMRs are much easier to pull off in the Summer because the sun rises up here well before 6:00am. When it’s a shorter jaunt, I’m usually home in time to make my family waffles!

The Harrison route is perfect for June/July/August. In the Fall and Winter, being that close to water for an extended period of time is just a little too bone chilling on a naked bike, which is why it’s been a year since my last round-trip.

I may do this one again before Labor Day/Labour Day. It’s just too awesome!
 
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