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Throttle tube probably needs to be cleaned. Do not lube it with grease! Use a silicone spray on it and the handle bars. I'll suggest replacing the 38 year old cables that have never seen lube in their entire lifespan. Fairly cheap and once done you'll never need to again, lube before installing.
 

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Thanks. I have no problem spending a little on new cables, but I don't know if I really trust myself replacing them. It may be fairly simple, but it doesn't look that easy. Is it a costly job to have a shop deal with it if it comes to that? Also, once I expose the end of the cable(s) at the throttle end, would lubing the cables at that point help at all or just be a waste of time?
 

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It'll take @1 hour to change them out, current labor rate around here averages $100/hr.
You can lube them once they're exposed at the top. Thin oil like sewing machine oil is used. Some people use WD40. You'll know it's properly lubed when it starts to drip out the bottom of the cable at the carbs, takes awhile to get there.
 

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Good to know. Thanks. I'll try to clean the bar and tube and lube first. May be my Saturday project.
 

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Hi again. Quick follow-up to the suggestions here. First of all, I do have silicone lubricant, so I'll use that on the bars and throttle tube as suggested.

As for the actual cable...man, there are a gazillion products out there and everyone swears by the one they happen to use. Here are my most practical options (in that I already have them):

• WD-40 (mixed reviews; people love it or hate it)
• Kroil (not really a lubricant)
• Silicone spray
• Lock-Eze (liquid graphite)
• Maxima Chain Wax
• plain old motor oil

I guess as important as what to use is how to use it. At this point in my experience I'd prefer not to remove the cable from the bike, so I'll do what I can after disconnecting them from the throttle grip end. My question has to do with how much stuff to use. All the methods I've seen say to put lube in until it comes out the other end. I can see that maybe for a clutch cable, but that can't apply to the throttle cable, can it? I wouldn't want excess going into the carb. I'm thinking I'll just apply a little bit judiciously and work the cable by hand until it makes its way at least most of way through the length of the cable. Or is that even worth the effort?

Thanks.
 

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WD40 and Kroil are great for cleaning and rust removal which may be a good part of the cables sticking if they are. They're not a lube though. If those are used them Silicone spray is worthless, incompatible. Motor oil is too thick to use. Chain wax would only work if the entire cable was exposed, Graphite spray will work IF the 1st 2 are not used.
I'd suggest this product https://www.3inone.com/products/multi-purpose-oil/. It's a thin oil that will travel the length of the cable.
 

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I have a feeling I shouldn't have started this little project. I separated the two halves of the housing and can see the cables wrapped around the tubing, but I can't get enough slack to remove them to slide the grip and tube off the bar. There seems to be some important step I'm missing. What is it?
 

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You should be able to pull the housing halves apart enough to rotate the throttle sleeve past the stop so the cable isn't wrapped around the sleeve. Then just push the end of the cable out of its spot in the sleeve and slide the sleeve off.
 

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Or rotate the throttle, grab the cable with needle nose pliers to hold it in place and then turn the tube back giving lots of slack to pop it out.
 

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You should be able to pull the housing halves apart enough to rotate the throttle sleeve past the stop so the cable isn't wrapped around the sleeve. Then just push the end of the cable out of its spot in the sleeve and slide the sleeve off.
They're apart enough that the halves are being held together only by the electrical connection for the kill switch (I think that's what it is). Not sure what you meant by "rotate the throttle sleeve past the stop".
 

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Or rotate the throttle, grab the cable with needle nose pliers to hold it in place and then turn the tube back giving lots of slack to pop it out.
And I tried that, too. I imagine once I get one out, the other will get enough slack, but right now they seem to be fighting each other. IMG_2770.JPG IMG_2778.JPG

Am I supposed to do anything with those other two nuts underneath that feed the cables into the housing?
 

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There should be a nut on one of the cables, if you turn it as far as it can go in one direction it will get looser. The other direction will make the cable tighter (sorry I don't remember which direction). Loosen it fully and see if you can get it off.

Those nuts will eventually have to come off to get the cables out
 

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You may have to slack off the cable adjustments, either at the carbs or at the handlebar housing to get enough slack to remove them from the sleeve.
 

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^^^yes, because push-pull cables are more difficult to change than the single cable throttle. It just takes creativity to give the cables as much slack as possible in every adjustment to allow disassembly.
 
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