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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've got a '71 CB350 K3 that won't start. I suspect it's the timing so I'm trying to get that set correctly. This is my first time to adjust the timing, and I have some rookie questions.

1. What is the purpose of the felt underneath the main cam? Should it be making contact with the cam? Mine's not. Is that a big problem?

2. My Clymer manual says that I should apply a light coat of breaker cam lubricant to the entire points area when I'm done. However, I can't find that stuff anywhere. (Apparently most of the folks shopping at AutoZone these days don't drive vehicles with breaker points. :D ) Should I use some other lubricant? WD-40 perhaps?

3. And this is the big question... Instead of using a test light, I'm trying to use my fancy-pants multimeter to know exactly when the points open. This has been an interesting experience and has already provided me with a much greater insight into how the ignition circuit works. (Most importantly: it works exactly opposite of how I assumed it worked)

The Ohm meter function of the multimeter has a buzzer function... as long as the circuit is complete, it will make a beeping sound. I adjusted the points plate so that the beeping stopped (i.e. the breaker points opened) right when the "LF" mark passed the index mark.

To double-check my handy work, I turned on the ignition and switched the multimeter over to read the voltage. This, however, yielded slightly different results. The voltage level starts rising a little bit before the "LF" mark arrives at the index mark.

Is that normal? Should I use the Ohm meter results or the voltage meter results?

As always, I appreciate any insight you guys can provide to a rookie!
 

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1. provides a resevior of lubrication for the cam/points follower block
2. try a HARLEY dealer or a GOOD auto supply shop,...
2a.WD_40 IS WORTLESS AS A LUBRICANT .... IT IS A WATER DISPERSANT.... NOT A LUBRICANT
3. disconnect the condenserers when using your meter to set the points.... your meter is reading the charging condenser

do not put any oil/grease anywhere but the felt, if you get any on the points contacts you're done until you clean them off
 

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I've always had indifferent results using meters to static time.
For resistance readings, the meter puts out a small current from its battery.
Like Jay said, with the condensors in place, it goofs things up because the tiny little meter current is trying to load up the condensors.
With condensors removed, it still never worked right for me - inexplicable current fluctuations....

Just use the light bulb method - but only with the condensors in place.
Otherwise, the current gets a straight shot to ground and will melt your test leads.
Don't ask how I know that one :oops: :oops: :shock:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
jayel said:
2. try a HARLEY dealer...
Sounds like I'll have to venture into enemy territory then. Will their Standard lubricant work on my Metric bike? :D


jayel said:
1. provides a resevior of lubrication for the cam/points follower block

do not put any oil/grease anywhere but the felt, if you get any on the points contacts you're done until you clean them off
I've still got some felt left on mine. It's just not making contact. Should I just shove it upwards until it does?

Also, what kind of oil do you put on it?
 

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Yep, just reposition the felt block so it touches / drags on the cam.

I've just used a few drops of whatever ol' motor oil happened to be in the oil can at the time... :D

I mean, you just want to keep it from drying out. Otherwise, y'get dry surface rubbing on dry surface, and y'get accelerated wear on the little points opener nubbin and more frequently having to reset the points gap.

But not so much slopping around that the oil fouls the points surfaces themselves.
 

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You should use a neon timing light to set the timing, and you should set it at maximum advance. If it doesn't return to the fixed advance setting at idle, you have an advance mechanism problem. Distributor cam lube is available - you can Google it. I've been using the same tube since about 1973 and there's enough left to last 'til at least the year 3000. In your case, the cotton wool wick is better off with liquid oil, and you should refresh it every so often - with only a drop. It doesn't have to contact the cam all the way 'round, just the high part - it will wipe off onto the cam and get wiped off onto the point set rubbing blocks, which is the intent of the system.
 

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Kerry.....
Sorry, I just don't get the Neon light part...
I use either 12V incandescent lamp (static timing), or a Zenon strobe, automotive type "timing gun" (dynamic timing).... I wouldn't think the 12VDC battery would "light" a Neon whose normal requirement is relatively high AC voltage.....
How do you get this to work??????
I wouldn't ask, but this is at least your second reference to a Neon light, and perhaps I can learn something new..... Steve
 

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The Zenon tube in your strobe is a gas discharge tube. A neon (both are classified as "noble gasses") strobe does the same thing - it kicks a lot of electrons loose in a gas making it momentarily conductive and producing a flash of light. you've got the right tool, just a different gas in the tube. And both are fired by the ignition pulse, probably in the vicinity of 20K volts.
 

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OK...I thought you were referring to using a neon bulb (like an Ne-2) for static timing.....
 
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