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I was changing the front tire for the first time and discovered that someone had used electrical tape in place of a rim strip. The tire is all I like having the bike ready to ride. My question, is the tape a safe alternative or should I order a strip and wait another week before I ride? The weather is perfect and I'm chomping at the bit to take a ride.
 

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I've seen E-tape, and Duct tape used, doesn't seem to make much difference once the tube is aired up, the rim strip isn't going anywhere and all it really does is cover the head of the spokes,
 

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in a pinch, an old inner tube cut to the rim with works fine. as said prior, the inflated tube holds the spoke nut protector in place. Enjoy your ride man! danWI
 

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If you insist on not spending a couple bucks for another strip then make sure to wrap that tape opposite the direction of rotation. So it self tightens. Quite a bit of heat can build up from friction between the tire, tube, and rim, resulting in the tapes adhesive getting warm and releasing. Wrapping opposite of rotation helps to counteract this.

Gorilla tape or a $2 rim strip... Or the before metioned innertube cut down to fit.


GB :mrgreen:
 

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I clean all rust off the inside of the rim (that'll really eat your tube), spray it with rust stabilizer and a few layers of aluminum paint and tune the wheel before I deal with anything else. In place of a rim band, electrical tape works fine. Friction tape is tougher. Use a fairly wide tape, and use a few layers. It isn't going anywhere at all once the tube is inflated. One thing: After you've tuned your wheel, check to be sure that no spoke ends stick in through the spoke nipples. I dust the inside of the tyre with talcum powder so there's no resistance to the tube aligning itself inside the casing when it's inflated. Incidentally, if your new front tyre is a little off being perfectly round, your front end will sort of "hump" at a certain speed. You can fix this by setting your motorbike on the main stand and rotating the wheel against an index block. Loosen spokes at the low point, tighten them at the high point. Progressively less tightening or loosening in both directions from those points, and adjust for an even "ping." The "hump" will disappear by the time you're down to about 1/8 inch out of round - tyre flex can handle that amount.
 

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KERRY said:
Incidentally, if your new front tyre is a little off being perfectly round, your front end will sort of "hump" at a certain speed. You can fix this by setting your motorbike on the main stand and rotating the wheel against an index block. Loosen spokes at the low point, tighten them at the high point. Progressively less tightening or loosening in both directions from those points, and adjust for an even "ping." The "hump" will disappear by the time you're down to about 1/8 inch out of round - tyre flex can handle that amount.
That's one thing I'd never do. Once that wheel is trued those spokes should be left alone. 1/8th out of round on a bare rim seems pretty excessive to actually be safe. To each his own I suppose.

GB :mrgreen:
 

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You're absolutely right - in the ideal world. I don't live there. I should have the tyre radius-ground (I mean, it's Supposed to be perfectly round), but that's a huge nuisance. Tweaking the rim a little may be a bit naughty, but it evens things out.
 
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