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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

Has anyone installed a Ricks Motorosports stator/regulator/rectifier kit? How is it?

In particular, what is the voltage under load at idle (lights on, 1100-1300 rpm).

I'd like to get one, but not if its only going to add 0.2 volts or something like that.

Thanks!

71hondacbtwin
 

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It's more amperage you need, not more voltage.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
True, but won't more amperage be reflected in more voltage? I don't think you can have one without the other, if all other factors are equal.

71hondacbtwin
 

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Nope, as evidenced by a modern bike's generator, which still outputs up to about 14 volts, but runs over 100 watts easily. His stator improves/increases the number of windings, which translates to more amps, but it has the same number of coils and the same phasing, so the output voltage remains the same.
 

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Sharkmonkey said:
....which still outputs up to about 14 volts, but runs over 100 watts easily. .....
100/14=~7.1 amps, about twice what you could realistically expect from a 350/450 type.
 

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Ric... I believe the "sizing' is different..... Give me until Monday and I'll compare a 360 stator with a 450 one for you....... Steve
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Sharkmonkey said:
Nope, as evidenced by a modern bike's generator, which still outputs up to about 14 volts, but runs over 100 watts easily. His stator improves/increases the number of windings, which translates to more amps, but it has the same number of coils and the same phasing, so the output voltage remains the same.
Of course you can have more amperage and still have the same voltage, which is easily seen by stepping up to four wheels and checking a modern car's charging system. Most car alternators will produce 55 amps at around 13 volts under maximum load. All modern cars and light trucks operate at the same voltage ("12V" nominal, 13.5-14.5 in operation), but some have higher amperage alternators than others. Especially compared to older vehicles.

But going back to the bike, if the load doesn't change (i.e. headlight, speedo/tach light, license plate light, ignition system are all the same), and I upgrade to a stator that produces more amperage at the same rpm as the original, won't the increased amperage output also be reflected in higher voltage at the battery?

I guess what I am saying is, no one ever said "Don't worry if you only have 7.5 volts at the battery, so long as your amps are alright than everything is ok."

???
 

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71hondacbtwin said:
... I upgrade to a stator that produces more amperage at the same rpm as the original, won't the increased amperage output also be reflected in higher voltage at the battery?

No, that's what the voltage regulator is for, to keep the voltage down to the 12 volt area......
 

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66Sprint said:
Ric... I believe the "sizing' is different..... Give me until Monday and I'll compare a 360 stator with a 450 one for you....... Steve
Roger That....
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
tbpmusic said:
71hondacbtwin said:
... I upgrade to a stator that produces more amperage at the same rpm as the original, won't the increased amperage output also be reflected in higher voltage at the battery?

No, that's what the voltage regulator is for, to keep the voltage down to the 12 volt area......
But when I'm only getting 11.9 volts at idle under load, I need the voltage to go up to the 13.5-14.5 volt window. The voltage regulator isn't restricting the upper limit of voltage at 11.9v.
 

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The regulator "shuts-down' (limits) the voltage to about 14.2 volts so you don't overcharge, but has no effect at any charging rate below that......Until its "trigger' voltage is reached, it's like it isn't even in the circuit.....
 

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I'm running rick's stator reg/rectifyer on my 350. from testing I can tell you that it will not put out 14volts at idle...just like the OEM stator it's designed to put out max voltage around 3,500 RPMs. that said it does a much better job keeping my battery charged when I'm out riding. I ride with the headlights on (I have a 55watt Halogen bulb and LED tail light) and it keeps the battery charged whereas the stock one would not.
 

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Top charge a 12 V lead acid battery that is 2V per Cell you require to input over 12V which is why modern voltage regulators are set to about 13.4 V.

This is to prevent overheating the battery and buckling the plates, often the death of many a battery when there were no solid state regulators and the magnetic coil type were too big to fit.

As an analogy think of electricity as a river, volts are the speed that the water is flowing. Amps should be thought of as the ammount of water that is flowing at the speed of the river.

To take this further, a small stream running very quickly is like the spark you see at the plugs. High voltage and low amps. It sure stings but doesnt really do much damage.
Howerer the river that is in full flood but running slower will still knock a house and bridge down, and cut out the grand canyon. This is where the Amps are taking an effect.

They are all linked with Ohms Law with DC........ I (amps) = E (volts)/R (resistance)
Then power is dreived as Watts which is I (amps) x E (volts)
Amps can be derived for the voltage divided by the resistance of the component it is running through e.g 12 v / 4 ohms will be 3 Amps (current)

AC will work slightly differently, as RMS power is measured at .707of Isquared max if I remember correctly,
But its near enough to give an idea even with AC.

Also interestingly the wattage of bulb does not describe the lux (the light given out) but the heat it creates. So a 75 watt bulb will create 75 watts of heat. Which is why halogen bulbs will take the skin of your fingers (personal experience there :oops: )

I hope that this will help It was a long time ago since I was at college, but the river explanation was always good for me to remember what does what.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Outobie,

What is the voltage at idle with the lights on? If it's better than 11.9v, I will look further into getting on.

Thanks!
 

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I didn't do an idle test of just the stator output and my bike is apart again for it's winter powdercoating and painting.
curiously though, why do you care about idle output? it's seems irrelevant to me since you should never idle air cooled bike engines excessively anyhow or they will overheat. under normal riding conditions the rick's setup is vastly superior to OEM and will allow you to run a headlight and keep your battery charged which OEM, even in perfect working condition, can't do.

if i had to take an educated guess I would think that the rick's setup would be slightly better than stock at idle but not by much...hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
"curiously though, why do you care about idle output?"

Good question. As part of my electrical conversion, I installed 45-led amber turn signals on my bike. Currently, when idling with the turn signal on, my signals do more of a rapid blink then a standard flash. Sort of BLINKBLINKBLINKoffBLINKBLINKBLINK rather than FLASHoffFLASH. I found if I rev the bike up, it evens out to what signals are supposed to look like. So if I could get more power at idle, they would flash properly all the time.

Or, what I would like to do, is switch back to incandescent bulbs. The 45 LED bulbs are bright enough, but not as good as stock. Also, even with amber LEDs, they are more of a yellow color than the deep orange of the originals. Just a preference.

All this is related to battery charge as well. I admit I haven't really had a problem with battery charge right now, but I live in a small town without much sitting at red lights. So I spend a lot of time off-idle, which keeps the battery charged. If I move to a more crowded area (which I am likely to do, I'm military), I fear the alternator wouldn't keep up.
 

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that's surprising to hear that LED's would be effected like that...I thought one of the main advantages of LEDs was that they required almost no electricity at all anyhow. how do they behave when the ignition is on but the engine is not running?
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I just checked... with the motor off and the headlight on, I get the b-b-b-blink problem. When I turn the headlight off, I get a nice ryhtmic flash.

But wait, I just had an idea when I typed that. I went back out to the bike, and checked the flash with the headlight on low beam and high beam, and found on low beam, I get the b-b-b-blink problem, but on high beam, I get a nice rythmic flash, even though the high beam circuit is taking up the same amount of power.

So it's the low beam circuit that is affecting the turn signal blink, not so much total draw. I don't know why at this point. I know I wired the marker light circuit of each front turn signal into the low beam power supply, but I don't know why that would affect the flashing... the marker and signal circuits are independent, as far as regular bulbe are concerned. But because the LED works differently, that is it uses the same LEDs for both marker and turn signal (i.e. they aren't separate like the filaments in a regular bulb), that means when I have the signal on with the low beam on, the low beam is trying to soak up some of the power through the LEDs themselves.

Ah-ha! I am going to check this out more tomorrow.
 

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Well you've answered one of your questions...you don't have a charging problem you have a wiring problem.

to diagnose, I'd start by eliminating all of the wiring harness and then begin adding in components one at a time untill you can repeat the problem.
1:) with the low beam on: connect battery positive to flasher (you did buy a flasher that is compatible with LEDs I assume), Flasher to LED, LED to battery negative
2:) with the low beam on: next disconnect the LED to battery ground and reattach LED to Harness ground
3:) with the low beam on: next disconnect flasher to LED and reconnect LED positive to wiring harness and flasher to LED harness connection
4:) if you still haven't found the problem and the LED is behaving properly you'll need to disconnect and jump each of the various sections of the harness. I'd start at the flasher and work upstream from there section by section and component by component till you get to the one causing the trouble.
Trouble could come in the form of a bad, loose or corroded connection of you you may find out you've miswired something, keep after it systematically and you'll get to the answer.
 
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