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Hey all,

I've got oil coming from the points cover and picked up a new oil seal to see that remedies the issue. Having never adjusted the points myself since owning the bike, do will I need to do so after going through the oil seal replacement? Or will the points be unaffected by me removing the points plate and replacing the seal?

Thanks for the help.

JB
 

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Hey all,

I've got oil coming from the points cover and picked up a new oil seal to see that remedies the issue. Having never adjusted the points myself since owning the bike, do will I need to do so after going through the oil seal replacement? Or will the points be unaffected by me removing the points plate and replacing the seal?

Thanks for the help.

JB
It's a high possibility that the points will need to be adjusted afterward, since most points plates from that era are not a tight fit in the machined area designed for them to fit - hence the same exact position is unlikely when you put it back together. Make a note of the position of the plate (rotationally, as in the way to advance or retard the timing by turning it) and check the points gaps before you remove the plate. When you re-assemble, put it back in the same exact spot (as closely as possible, of course) and re-check the gaps, and then adjust if necessary. After that, see how it runs but be prepared to remove the alternator cover (a little oil will run out so put it on the centerstand) and use a test light to check each side to see how close each comes to the F and LF marks when the test light comes on. Be advised - points have a rubbing block that opens them and it wears over time, reducing the gap and retarding the timing... so they will have to be adjusted periodically. You should familiarize yourself with the procedure for future maintenance purposes.
 

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You sure it's the seal and not from the orings that seal the rocker pins?
Your camshaft sagging?
You aren't supposed to change either one with the engine in the frame. Proper job is to remove and disassemble.
 

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The Oil Seal for the Cam Shaft on the End Bearing Cap is not a simple job to do with the motor in the frame.

It is NOT supposed to be done with the motor in the frame.
It is supposed to be done when the motor out and 1/2 torn down.

The problem lies in the Cam Chain Tension that will pull the Cam Down and cause it to twist and cock sideways in the Bearing Caps.

If you do attempt this:
A - Loosen ALL Tension from the Valve Adjusters.
B - Remove the Cam Chain Tensioner HOUSING Completely to insure there is ZERO Tension on the Chain.

Use Extreme caution when sliding the End Cap Bearing off the Cam to make sure it is NOT Scratched or damaged in any way.
When replacing it, if it takes more than Hand Pressure to Seat the End Cap Bearing over the Cam - STOP - and figure out WHY or you WILL damage the bearing surface.

While you are in there Check the Bearing has NOT worn into an OVAL Shape.
The Cam is Pulled DOWN by the Chain Tension and Pushed DOWN by the Valve Rockers & Springs.
This means the bottom will wear and can wear into an OVAL Shape that allows the Cam to SAG creating a GAP at the TOP of the Shaft Seal.

You may even want to LOOK for a gap between the Shaft and the Seal - Before you start to do the replacement.
If there is a GAP replacing the Seal will most likely NOT solve your issue.
 
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