Honda Twins banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
383 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
When replacing the diaphragm with the original style does one use any cement to secure the replacement to the slide. I suspect when originally assembled, the diaphragm was simply placed between the washer and retainer and secured. But replacing, one must work the diaphragm into the space between the washer and retainer, so I am guessing there is potential for it to not be as secure and i have no idea how much pressure it is enduring. Guessing not much based on the spring.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
10,181 Posts
The original replacement diaphragms were all one piece, slide and diaphragm as a unit. I've not personally replaced a diaphragm since they have been sold separately, I'd assume you'd follow the seller or manufacturer's installation procedure
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
383 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
no direct documentation from manufacturer/seller was available that I could find at 4into1. Online searches obviously included the common motor approach - which I was not gung ho about trying and it used a different diaphragm without the tab. So I basically, removed the old with a blade, cleaned out the slot between washer and retainer and then worked in the replacement. Seems pretty solid.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,447 Posts
I replaced the diaphragms on my GL1200. They came with a thick superglue to bond them to the pistons. On the 1200 there is a small pressure hole in the base of the piston. I'm not sure about the 350, but I believe the orientation is important. I put together this video about my 1200 carbs:

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
144 Posts
Common-motor says to super glue them. Everyone else says not to. I would not. At most maybe use a flexible gasket sealer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
383 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Did not use the Common Motor diaphragm, and replaced both of mine with ones from 4into1. Basically cut out the old and used a box cutter blade to clear out remnants between the washer and the retainer. Then worked in the replacements gently prodding the diaphragm into the space between washer and retainer. Of course made sure to get orientation correct so that two holes in slide base are at back/toward air intake.
Bike is running much better. No lingering high throttle/idle. Rode it for about 1 hour through a variety of roads and it behaved well. Bike is not running perfectly by any means, but well for me. Someday would like to experience what a well timed/tuned one runs like.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,447 Posts
Good to hear it came out OK. I will never forget how my 1975 CB360T ran after I took it into the dealer for the 600mi check back in 1975. These bike are very sweet once they are in a proper state of tune. I always start by setting the valves, check the timing (I use electronic ignition) and then adjust the carbs. Valve lash will affect the carbs, that is why I do that last. Once you start getting it dialed in you will learn how the different setting affect each other. Enjoy!
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top