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Discussion Starter #1
My first project to get to know my bike: replacing all the screws! I wrote up the escalating process I used to remove the seized and stripped ones here:

Remove Seized & Stripped Screws from Motorcycle Engine Covers

basically: Try JIS screwdriver with penetrating oil, then manual impact driver, then electric impact driver, then left handed drill bits or extractor


I know I've only scratched the surface on this topic-- how do y'all get stuck screws out? Any extreme tales to share? Thanks to this project I now know my bike's anatomy a bit better and am prepped for my next oil filter cleaning. :-D
 

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My idea didn't work so don't try it.

image002.jpg
 

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in certain instances, you can dremmel off the head of the screw(s) which will allow the part to be removed (clutch cover etc.). you can then easily remove the remaining stud.
 

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Oh I have a tale of PO stupidity that flustered and frustrated me for a week.

On the rear fender there is a shouldered bolt that threads into the fender. The fender has a permanent mounted nut attached to it. Well that nut was stripped out by the PO so they went ahead and put in the bolt then they tack welded the end of the bolt to the nut so that it would hold on the fender. Unbeknownst to me - I tried all sorts of things to remove the bolt. Finally I had a get a hacksaw blade and cut through the old bolt on the inside between the frame and the fender. It all came apart but now I have to source a new bolt and repair the fender...

The other was the worst - frozen oil drain plug. I had to dremel off the sides of the bolt and then use a pipe wrench to get enough grip to break it free.

WP_20150809_004.jpg
 

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I know we put a lot effort to removing seized case screws. No conversation is complete with out mentioning installation. My method is to use anti-seize compound (copper grease) for all installations including the drain plug and tappet covers.
 

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Im not a fan of Ss allen heads as a replacement, theres the whole galvanic reaction issue, which is why the stock are zinc coated, also the softness of the stock JIS cheese heads means its impossible to over torque the stock machine screws. Also dump that manual and get a pdf of the FSM
 

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Hi Simo
When I was working in the hovercraft industry all fasteners were St St. More often that not into aluminium as weight is a real issue on Hovercraft. All fasteners were installed with a corrosion inhibitor and there was rarely any issues even with the more corrosive sea water. I agree completely that without the inhibitor there would have been serious consequences.


Im not a fan of Ss allen heads as a replacement, theres the whole galvanic reaction issue, which is why the stock are zinc coated, also the softness of the stock JIS cheese heads means its impossible to over torque the stock machine screws. Also dump that manual and get a pdf of the FSM
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Im not a fan of Ss allen heads as a replacement, theres the whole galvanic reaction issue, which is why the stock are zinc coated, also the softness of the stock JIS cheese heads means its impossible to over torque the stock machine screws. Also dump that manual and get a pdf of the FSM
Oh I didn't know about the galvanic response issue! Why would 4into1 sell Ss replacement screws then? I used Permatex aluminum anti seize lubricant when I installed the new screws. What screws would you recommend instead? Half of my JIS screws are toast/unusable now. My weak lady arms have never had to worry about over torquing a screw before.

And I read that the FSM isn't much more helpful for my bike than the Clymer, but I'll take all the manuals I can get and found a thread with a link to download. Thanks again!
 

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Great video. I see a lot of young women riding and wrenching on their own bikes these days. It is awesome to see these women getting involved in the sport/hobby. As for the stainless steel allen bolts in the aluminum, by using an anti-seize product just as you did, there should not be any problems. I have been using stainless steel bolts in aluminum motorcycle engines for 4 decades without any problems.
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The Aluminum Honda uses is pretty low on the galvanic scale, but higher than say the old British bikes. That is why Honda does paint and clear coat and the case walls are thiner. Even the OEM zinc screws will corrode over time. I have used stainless steel allen heads and anti-seize compound. You have to go easy on the torque, 5-7 foot pounds is plenty for a 6mm bolt.
 

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Another option is to grind a tip on a punch. Then tap the punch until the offending screw breaks loose. That's how I managed to get all mine free. Of course this only works if you plan on replacing them.
 

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I use a manual impact driver so far only 3 screws on 9 stipped 175/200 engines (one badly salt damaged) have needed to be drilled. Even mashed heads will come out,
I have shattered an over tight valve cover ( PO was a gorilla) was a PITA because the motor ran but i pulled it and stripped the top end till i found all the bits
 

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A hammer type impact driver was/and still is, IMO, a must have for Phillips screws.

Two tricks I was taught over 50 years ago, are to:

- use a hammer to tap the screwdriver bit into the head of a used screw to form the screw socket to a perfect fit to the bit.
- dip the bit into valve lapping compound (valve grinding compound) to add grip. This is as magic as sliced bread, for those who haven't tried. A can or tube of lapping compound will last decades for this purpose.
 
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