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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought my wife a 1978 Hondamatic, but it's just a little to tall for her. She can touch on her tippy toes but not the flats of her feet. I want to lower the rear end, and found that Emgo sells shorty shocks. Only problem is that the 1978 Hondamatic uses clevis to clevis shocks, and after that they switched to rod end to clevis. Emgo only has rod end to clevis shorty shocks, and I was wondering if anyone knew if the rod ends could be removed and I can machine up a new clevis or swap out for one of the original ones. It's hard to tell from the pictures online if the rod ends are threaded onto the cylinder or if they are integral.
Thanks
Eric

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You don't need to be able to put both feet flat on the ground, tip the bike slightly. Removing suspension travel at one end does not sound like the way to deal with the issue. If she doesn't become comfortable with one foot on the ground it might be better to find a bike that is for her.
 

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I've no objection to lowering the bike (equally at both front and rear) but you will lose ground clearance......
Lowering only the rear essentially changes the rake angle making turns/turning harder.......
I see no reason you could not adapt an "eye to clevis" shock to a "clevis to clevis" IF you have the fabrication tooling...
Usually, the damping assembly is at the lower end and the moving central rod is threaded into the top "eye"....
 

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Rather than alter the way the bike is set up, have you considered having the seat re-sculpted to give the required height?
 

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I vote for a new lowered seat as well. This can make a huge difference in height.
 

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Short shocks equal less suspension travel and this model is already in short supply there. Reshape the seat is the best path
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Wife prefered lowering the bike over reshaping the seat (just remember, when you're married you're always wrong! :D)
Anyways, bought the shorty shocks and was able to get the rod end off. Machined up two new clevis's since the originals were all rusted. Sandblasted and blackened.
I made the clevis from the original without having the new shocks in hand. The new ones have a smaller diameter spring and a taper on the end. Also machined up two new 'skirts' that act as a washer / locator.
IMG_20190528_173407.jpg IMG_20190529_074704.jpg
 
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