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Discussion Starter #1
Could not find this subject so starting new post. On a 1972 CB350K4, trying to remove cylinder head studs. I tightened two nuts against each other on a stud, put a healthy amount of PB Blaster at the base of the stud, but could not turn the stud. I don't want to break anything, so I was wondering if a heat gun is a practical solution and is it possible to apply too much heat?
 

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There's various ways of getting them out, but the double/triple nut method is one of the least destructive. A heat gun almost certainly won't get the cases hot enough to do any damage, but equally, it may not get them hot enough to release the studs.

A blowtorch would be a better bet, but don't go berserk. I removed mine to replace them with heavy duty (race) studs because . . . reasons. Didn't have too much trouble in the end, but be very careful when you put the replacement studs in to get them set to the right height. It's easy to not set them deep enough in the cases and if you do that, you won't be able to torque the top end down enough to seal the engine. Trust me when I say that's no fun.

Basically, unless you've got a (really) good reason to pull them out, I wouldn't bother . . .
 

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Discussion Starter #4
My question is Why do you find it necessary to remove them?........
Error: I want to remove the studs from a donor K3, not my K4. Trying to rearrange parts and pieces to make storage more efficient.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
There's various ways of getting them out, but the double/triple nut method is one of the least destructive. A heat gun almost certainly won't get the cases hot enough to do any damage, but equally, it may not get them hot enough to release the studs.

A blowtorch would be a better bet, but don't go berserk. I removed mine to replace them with heavy duty (race) studs because . . . reasons. Didn't have too much trouble in the end, but be very careful when you put the replacement studs in to get them set to the right height. It's easy to not set them deep enough in the cases and if you do that, you won't be able to torque the top end down enough to seal the engine. Trust me when I say that's no fun.

Basically, unless you've got a (really) good reason to pull them out, I wouldn't bother . . .
I need to learn new skills, so I'm thinking that practicing on a non-essential (for now) component is a safe move.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Many thanks to all the responses. I'll try some heat, maybe invest in a stud puller. Once again, the forum has helped. J
 

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I had 3 badly damaged studs on my CL350. Two came out with difficulty using the Lisle tool mentioned. The 3rd sheared off requiring being drilled out. Fortunately the cylinder and case mating surfaces are parallel so I mounted the case to a piece of plywood and was able to position the case to drill it out. I do have 1 extra front outer stud with the rubber insulator if you're in need
 

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I find the Matco-style stud removers are great if the studs aren't holding too tight. If they're really tight in, the cam-grip mechanism on the inside has a nasty habit of chewing up threads, esp. when you're dealing with cylinder studs where the body of the stud is narrow and the only thing to get hold of is the threaded ends. I've also had two sets and found the 10mm gave up both times. Admittedly it's the one I tend to use most, but it hasn't taken long for them to refuse to grip. I've since picked up a Lisle-style remover but haven't had a chance to give it a go yet because I discovered blow torches.

If you don't care about the studs themselves, one of the better ways I've heard of shifting them is to heat them and bend them at 90deg. Gives you a lot more purchase and torque force, but as LongDistance has found, you don't want them shearing off. Also, how far you bend them depends of how many others are left - you don't want to get a half turn in and find you can't go any further 'cos you're up against another stud.
 
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