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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 1970 CL350 that had the stock gearing (16/38) and functioned without issue. The chain was almost stretched to the limits, and I read that it is ideal to replace the sprockets with the chain. So I read a bit, and foudn a great thread on this forum that I wish I could find again but can't, about chain lengths and gear ratios. From what I read, I concluded that I would buy a 17/36 combo with a new 96 link chain, and it would be a simple swap out.

The studs for the rear sprocket must be different on the CL's than the CB's (for which this 36 sprocket is designed for) because the original studs do not contact the inner surface to prevent them from spinning as they did with the original sprocket. This means I can not tighten down the 4 nuts ont eh studs. I found one other person that had this exact issue and posted on this forum, but what he did to resolve it wasn't added. http://www.hondatwins.net/forums/52-tires-wheels-brakes/29932-cb350-cush-drive.html. I'd like to mention that everything else about the sprocket fits perfectly.

So my question is what went wrong? Was I sent the wrong sprocket from Common Motor? Was I supposed to know that new studs were implied with the change in gear ratio? None of the forums I read about changing the gear ratios mentioned these studs.

The biggest issue is that I have very little time to get this sorted out, I mistakenly assumed everything would fit properly and waited until now, 1 week before I must have this done by to try fitting them. I leave to go back to school.

Any Ideas on the quickest option to fix this?

Potential Solutions I see:

I found online what the proper studs are to fit this sprocket, but can't find any for sale, and would rather not have to spend money on this, so I'm ruling this out as an option.

Return the 36 sprocket and purchase a 38 tooth (assuming it is an exact copy of the one I have so the studs will actually fit). In which case I ask, will the 96 link chain fit or do I need to return that one too, in which case which size do you recommend? I really wish I could find the thread that described this quite well but I can't find it.

Could I just stick something to fill the the gap between the flat side of the stud and the wheel so I can tighten it down? Or is the contact essential, not just the stud being tightened?

If all else fails I could put the old sprocket back on, but that would drive me up the wall because I've tried to hard to get everything about this bike ironed out perfectly, to have a new front sprocket and chain but the old rear is enough to make my blood boil.
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Cl and cb studs are different? Hmmm, my cl studs have flats on each side and the recess in the sprocket seems narrower than yours. Your studs are kinda half circle. Aren't sprockets sold to fit both CB and cls universally? That's weird, I'd say you got the wrong sprocket but I'm not sure. If you can get it on and get the circlip on and the nut safe tabs then your good to go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm not sure if the studs are different between he two, but I've looked around and there are definitely different studs, most people seem to have studs that have two flat, parallel sides. To clarify, I can't tighten down the 4 nuts on the wheel because the stud just spins freely, since that flat side of the stud doesn't contact anything.
 

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Yeah, I see that. If I recall right, Both the cl350 andcb350f (same rear wheel) sprockets I have, have narrower recesses so the studs catch. Was the sprocket you removed the same? If it was me I'd glue the stud in with whatever I had on the shelf that'd work, get the circlip and bend the safe tabs and call it good.
 

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I wonder if Common Motor gets their sprockets from Rebel Gears or Moto Madness? If so they make one sprocket to fit a wide variety of bikes. In order to secure the studs you are going to have to clamp a pair of vice grips to them and then torque the nuts. They (Rebel Gears) know about this issue, but pretty much refuse to do anything about it.

I ran into the same exact issue when I built my wife's bike and this is what I did to remedy the situation.
 

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The problem is not the studs, it is the new sprocket, as the raised portion that is supposed to contact the flat on the stud has a smaller diameter and therefore does not contact the flat as you can see from your picture. There is no way to know if a different sprocket, other than OEM, will be correct. I have encountered this problem on every 350 I have worked on and hold the stud with a small screwdriver or pick under the sprocket and wedged between the flat on the stud and the raised portion of the new sprocket.
 

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I got a replacement sprocket for my CB350 from 4into1.com, and it worked perfectly with the stock studs. Their prices are reasonable.
 
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Use red locktite and a pair of vise grips to cinch them down tight. Keep in mind you will need to heat the nuts, next time you take it apart, to get the locktite to let go.
 
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