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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I just got really lucky and bought a really killer tank off ebay for $200:

s-l1600 (2).jpg

s-l1600 (1).jpg


However, I need to seal the inside, which is very rusty. I've done this a few times before but never on a tank that has the tube connecting the right and left halves of the tank via the two outlets. If any of you have sealed these tanks, how did you keep those outlets from getting sealed in the process?

Also, on the general topic of protecting the tank, what polish and wax do yall use on paint this old? What can I do to make sure this looks great and doesn't get killed by sitting in the sun every now and then?
 

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If its just rusty inside, I use regular old vinegar and some nuts and bolts to shake around in between sitting. Works really well and wont damage the paint if you clean it off with soap and water.
Tank will flash rust, but if you spray some penetrating oil on it right after the final rinse you'll be good to go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Definitely, that has worked well for me. However I'm referring more to the little tubes that pop out of the tank on the left and right sides and are linked by a fuel line. I just need to know how to keep them from being sealed shut when I use a tank liner.

Also eager to hear what products are safe and work well on the exterior paint of the tank. The paint on this tank looks to be in really good shape but there is some rust coming through in places and it's lightly fading. I want to seal off/prevent further rust and apply something that will shield against UV rays.
 

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I used Red-Kote on my '72 CB175 tank after a failed POR-15 application and it worked amazingly well. I just put a piece of hose connecting the two and after the coating set up a bit and got tacky, I ran a piece of wire through it and then a pipe cleaner with MEK on it. I then hit each with about 30 psi of compressed air and have excellent flow through both.
 

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Same - Pipe Cleaners soaked in solvent work really good for cleaning out those tubes just before every things start to setup.
 

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I’ll offer the contradictory opinion. I have more problems with previously lined tanks than I do with rusty ones. If it’s just surface rust and old fuel, there is no need to line the tank. It’s easy to screw it up, and hard to fix
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks all. Ive actually had the inverse experience with redkote. It sprang a leak and i had to redo it with por-15. Ill get some mek and pipe cleaners.

What is good for old original paint to protect it? Aftaid of UV damage; its already fading
 

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I spent a good week cleaning redkote out of a tank, so much fun!
 

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Salvaging the Paint may be a problem.
Most of the really good cleaners to make sure the insides is properly prepped will remove paint really fast.

It will be hard to protect the painted surface from them.

But good luck I really have no suggestions on this one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'm fairly certain that with some plastic bags and tape, I can protect the paint from the lining chemicals. In my previous posts I meant more that I'm looking for products like waxes and polishes that will condition the paint, protect, and add some shine and luster. Specifically ones that will help minimize the UV damage from sunlight.
 

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I wrap the out side of the tank with paper and then another layer of plastic such as visqueen. Then make sure the neck is well taped off. I have done three tanks with Caswell, two were Goldwings and the other CB450 DOHC. All came out perfect and the oldest has been in use for three years with no problems. Goldwing tanks have a tube that is 10 inches long and the pickups have screens on them. The trick to keeping the tubes clear is use compressed air. After you have sloshed the liner around inside of the tank, turn the tank upside down and blow compressed air through the tube. As long as the tank is upside down it will not refill. When you do this following the instructions is critical, especially temperatures. Also, getting the tank as clean as possible is a must. Good luck and keep us informed.
 

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Metal Rescue is something I've recently heard of, doesn't harm paint, not harmful for the environment if that's your thing too & gets rid of rust. Bought some of it just a week ago to work on my sons bike. Only thing is it needs to be warm weather...doesn't work if it's cold so I'm stuck until summer gets here. Comes in concentrate (add a gallon of water) or gallon jugs. Picked it up at local auto parts store.
 

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I've had really good results with: remove cap and fuel tap (and 'cork' well), put a few dozen drywall screws in DRY tank- stuff rag into filler hole and shake the s**t out of it for at least ten minutes and then remove ALL the screws. Rinse well with mild soapy water to remove all the fuel residue and loose rusty stuff. Fill completely with distilled white vinegar, cap with tape and let sit for several days. Drain but save vinegar and inspect your work. Repeat the vinegar step until satisfied. Rinse well with water and drain well, and immediately after that with at least a pint of 90% isopropol alcohol, shake the s**t out of it again and drain well, then dry as best as you can using rags firmly attached to a stick. Then, GLOVES/SAFETY GLASSES,ETC. pour a quart of OSPHO (phosphoric acid) in and shake well, rest, roll to coat the entire interior, repeat, etc. until all interior surfaces are dark gray or *light* black. Drain well using rags as necessary. Done! The vinegar is the deruster, the alcohol is a dryer, and the PP acid is the sealer. Save the PP acid for the next one.
 

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I have done MANY of these tanks over the decades. The only tanks I ever seal are fiberglass tanks, and that is to work with ethanol laced gasoline (Caswell sealer). A steel tank I would never coat. I don't feel it is necessary. All I ever do is dump a box full of drywall screws in and shake for however long it takes to get the loose scale off. Sometimes it might take 20 minutes, sometimes 2 hours. But when it is done, and rinsed with soapy water a couple of times and left to dry, it will get a slight flash coat of rust, but won't cause any problems. Sometimes I will run an inline fuel filter for the first couple of tanks if a customer requests it, but it is not necessary. I have spent many hours cleaning out old chemical liners. If they stick, they are wonderful, but if they don't then you've got a clogged carb and a lot of headaches. Now if the tank has actual rust holes in it that is another story, I am just talking run of the mill rust from sitting forever. Good luck.
 
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