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Neighbor was selling a non-running 1982 Goldwing (GL1100). "Ran when it was parked". Other listed problems was a bad rear tire (yes, it is) and a bad rear suspension (has an air leak, somewhere).

The price was right.

It was a quarter mile to my house, all uphill.

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Did some research, and this seems to be a standard GL1100, with aftermarket accessories to make it dressed.

I've removed the carbs, and the jets are very visibly clogged. But I've think they've been rebuilt recently. I'm swapping in a new accelerator pump and new air cutoff valves, but I'm hoping the existing gaskets will work.

I'll have to admit, I am appreciating the simplicity of my little CM400E more and more as I work on the GL1100. The CM400E is far easier to work on, and has less that can go wrong.
 

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Holy long exhaust pipes Batman!

Nice ride once you get everything sorted out. Those carbs can be a major dollar to fix. I flipped an 1100 that had the single carb/manifold conversion and it was a nice upgrade.

The standards had a large weight behind the headlight and mounted on the forks. It was there to compensate for the lack of weight of the fairings found on the Interstates and Aspencades. It is something I would have in place if I was running it as a standard.
++I flipped models, the standard doesn't have the weight the Interstate and Aspencade did, if you run a fairing on a standard the weight helps keep the front end planted. +++

Have fun.
 

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I put about 100,000 miles on an '81 Necked Wing - don't recall any "large weight behind the headlight".
The rear shocks are an easy rebuild, but I could never get them to take as much oil as "the book" said.
As for the carbs, you need to get the Randaak information, he's a god among Wing guys - visit https://goldwingdocs.com/forum/viewforum.php?f=4&sid=ac1eb4106ff8c5fabfd8a7e60fbd8d94 for lots of help.
The rear tire will be a real beast - my advice, just pay The Man to do it for you.
Replace the timing belt and water pump immediately.
Once running, you'll find it's the most dependable bike you'll ever own, and a joy to ride. Despite its size it's amazingly maneuverable once it's rolling. Smooth and quiet beyond belief, powerful and FAST - it will do 120 mph in a heartbeat, and won't scare the **** out of you when you do it.
 

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I would rather change a tire on a shaft drive over a chain drive any day. Great score!!
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You can go change it for him then......
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Holy long exhaust pipes Batman!
They looked strange at first, but I have to admit I'm liking them now.

Nice ride once you get everything sorted out. Those carbs can be a major dollar to fix. I flipped an 1100 that had the single carb/manifold conversion and it was a nice upgrade.
Supposedly, the single carb/manifold conversion takes a hit to performance somewhere in the powerband, depending how it is tuned. I'm tearing apart the carbs now, and just degumming them. I have a suspicion that these have been rebuilt about three years ago. Hoping to hear this thing run soon.

But the gum - OMG, the gum. I've never seen carbs this bad. All from dried gas in the bowl. Everything else is fine, but where gas sat in the bowl and could dry out over time, it did. My technique is to soak for awhile in mineral oil, take the jets out, take a very fine wire (one strand from some electrical wires I have), attempt to poke a hole through the gum so the solvent can access it, then throw the jet in some brake cleaner for a few hours. I'm not trying to clean the jets with the wire - just poke through the gum a bit so the solvent can work.

The standards had a large weight behind the headlight and mounted on the forks. It was there to compensate for the lack of weight of the fairings found on the Interstates and Aspencades. It is something I would have in place if I was running it as a standard.
I don't see one on this bike, but I didn't look too closely yet. Trying to get this in running condition first, before I tackle the cosmetic things. I'll probably run it faired for a few months. Rocking that classic Vetter Windjammer. I thought the weight was on the Interstates/Aspencades to balance out the OEM fairing - not on the standards. But I may have been breathing in more than a healthy share of solvent fumes lately.

Nice big chair! Most have been fun to push it home....
In retrospect, while I thought to air up the tires, I should of thrown some air into the rear suspension.

I had to take frequent breaks pushing it home. Push half a block, then stop and gaze at the continuing incline ahead that you have forgotten about. Repeat a half dozen times.

I put about 100,000 miles on an '81 Necked Wing - don't recall any "large weight behind the headlight".
The rear shocks are an easy rebuild, but I could never get them to take as much oil as "the book" said.
As for the carbs, you need to get the Randaak information, he's a god among Wing guys - visit https://goldwingdocs.com/forum/viewforum.php?f=4&sid=ac1eb4106ff8c5fabfd8a7e60fbd8d94 for lots of help.
The rear tire will be a real beast - my advice, just pay The Man to do it for you.
Replace the timing belt and water pump immediately.
One of the reasons why I looked at this is that I read the rear shocks are rebuildable, and the kits looked reasonable enough. Wish this had the '83 shocks though - those are specced to work with 0 psi. The '82s are not.

Timing belt is supposedly replaced. I found the owner-before-previous-owner's information in the paperwork and I think I'll call and confirm. Don't know about the water pump - no coolant leaks that I saw, but it doesn't run.

I haven't even checked the handy owner's manual to see how to remove the rear tire. Not even anywhere near tire replacement yet. I'll probably do it myself because I want to check the wheel bearings as well. And I'm a masochist.
 

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The rear tire change is not especially complicated or anything, it's just massive and heavy, I doubt if you'll be able to do it alone. I had to use a small floor jack to help.
 

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I put about 100,000 miles on an '81 Necked Wing - don't recall any "large weight behind the headlight".

You are correct, I flipped the models the weight is on and corrected my post.

My knees are aching just thinking about any kind of serious mileage on a naked bike .....
 

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Naked just refers to lack of fairings or covering body work, exposing the engine, and perhaps smaller fenders.....
NOT to any change in seating or footpeg/floorboard position.....
 

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I do not mind changing tires on shaft drive bikes. Just put the bike on the center stand, remove the brake stay bolt, or caliper. Then remove the rear axle, drop the spacer/brake backing plate out, slide the wheel over and it comes right out. Reverse to install. I do them by myself all the time. Be sure to grease the axle when putting it back in.
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As I recall the '82 A and I models were the first to offer direct-from-Honda fairings and stuff. Prior to that it was all aftermarket for the Wings. In fact after '82 it was tough to get one without all the touring crapola.
And Steve is right, Naked just meant no fairings or other crap - I guess I assumed everyone knew that, sorry.......
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Been two months, and I'm nearing the point where the non-running bike is in pretty good shape. Took about 40 - 60 hours of typical old bike repairs. Still a few issues, one I'll probably just live with for now, and a few others I'll address.

When I've been able to ride it, the Goldwing feels like a nice solid touring bike. Not my favorite bike to wrench on though. Clearances are tight enough to make everything annoying.
 
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