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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, I am the proud owner of a slightly running 1975 Honda CB200T and I am proceeding with disassembly and servicing and what not. This is my first motorcycle and my first time working on one but my teacher helped me convince my parents to let me do it as an extra credit kind of thing. I'm 16 by the way. I have removed the gas tank, exhaust pipes, foot pegs and the foot peg bracket that goes under the frame. I have removed the air filters and now the carbs, sadly while removing one of the carbs I found out that the nut on one of the screws bonded to the screw and when i was unscrewing it it just snapped the screw in half, I found the screw on a website which I will link at the bottom of this post, its double threaded and I'm not sure how to get it out, any ideas? thanks.
View attachment 267148 View attachment 267150 I will add a picture as well.

https://www.cmsnl.com/honda-cb200t-1975-usa_model426/bolt-stud-6x28_9271206028/#.W8X5hLxKjq8
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Welcome - plenty of knowledge available here for the 200s, those guys will be along shortly. That broken bolt is a stud and it might require a little heat to help loosen it in the head, and you want to proceed carefully so no damage gets done to the threaded hole in the head. Goods that you know about cmsnl.com, they're great for looking up part numbers and for the parts you can't find elsewhere but the shipping can be really high from them, sometimes far outsizing the part cost. That stud is a pretty common metric part so you shouldn't have too much trouble finding one, possibly even locally. Here's a listing at David Silver Spares, another good resource for vintage Honda stuff

https://www.davidsilverspares.com/parts/by-part-number/part_92712060280B/
 

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A propane torch is a safe bet, just be sure - of course - to remove the gas tank and the other carb and be cautious as to the location you point the flame. Just heat up the area of the aluminum head very near the stud while trying to avoid the stud itself. The aluminum will expand more quickly than the steel. Then you can use whatever best method you have available, a pair of vise grips with good jaws, a small pipe wrench if you can get it in position, whatever you can turn it with that will provide some leverage. Just use caution and try to avoid breaking it off flush or the difficulty factor will increase significantly. Someone else mentioned trying to melt a little wax down around the threads as it wicks into the threads more easily than a penetrant, but doing one of those two will also help loosen it before you put the grips into action
 

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Discussion Starter #5
How would one go about the wax? Would it be a specific wax or candle wax or what? Sorry if that sounds ignorant I'm pretty new to this.
 

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I've always used penetrant but the wax was mentioned by someone recently... I'd assume the heat in the area would melt the wax if you simply put a candle tip or edge on the heated part, but I've not tried it. Penetrant like PB Blaster or other versions will soak in slowly but if you spray it on a hot surface sometimes it can ignite. In your case, just having a piece of the stud to grab hold of after heating the aluminum of the head nearby will make it easier. You could spray the penetrant on it the day before and let it try to soak in
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Ok thanks Tom. I will get my hands on some penetrant, a torch and some vice grips and try that. I assume I'd heat it apply the vice grips and just try and slowly turn it and be careful not to bend or snap it?
 

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Pretty much that, yes... just heat cautiously and move the stud back and forth to get it loosened up before trying to take it out completely, and soak more penetrant into it as you go
 

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No, it's still unscrewing... but the reason I mention it that way is for you to help work some penetrant into it as you turn it back and forth before just attempting to turn it out all at once - it broke off for a reason and that reason is probably corrosion on the threads, so you want to do it gently and progressively so it doesn't break off again.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
No, it's still unscrewing... but the reason I mention it that way is for you to help work some penetrant into it as you turn it back and forth before just attempting to turn it out all at once - it broke off for a reason and that reason is probably corrosion on the threads, so you want to do it gently and progressively so it doesn't break off again.
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Ok thanks I will try this as soon as I can get what I need.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
So I haven't gotten to get that screw out but in the mean time I plan to clean my carbs. I've heard that its nice and easy to get one of those carb cleaner buckets with the basket for the small parts. Now I have also heard that carb cleaner dries up the rubber seals and all that and even if the cleaner doesn't get on the seals that it is a pain to get said seals to reseal. So if that is the case should I order a carb seal replacement kit or something like that?
 
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