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66replica said:
Hi all,

Trying to prep my parts to send to the powdercoater. Do I need to remove the parts highlighted in red? If so, how do I?
The powder coating process uses temps from 350F to around 440F (if they hot flock) so any grease that is in/on the swing arm will melt and run out ruining the coating. Rubber parts MAY melt and need to be removed and the entire part needs to be spotlessly clean and bare metal for a professional result.

So if i were doing it, yes i'd remove those parts and then clean the entire swing to remove any old grease etc than get it sand blasted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That's what I thought. I hammered on the parts using a flatblade and couldn't get them to budge. Is there some sort of trick?
 

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They may have to be pressed out. The shock bushings are especially stubborn. I left mine in and they survived but I wouldn't recommend it. What parts are left in the pivot area still???

I used a dremel tool and milling bit to cut my bushings out of the swingarm, then the rest came out easily enough..

Rod, I assume you meant "unless they hot flock the parts" Cuz the entire swingarm could be powdercoated by flocking without any problems, from what experiences I've had..


GB :mrgreen:
 

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66replica said:
That's what I thought. I hammered on the parts using a flatblade and couldn't get them to budge. Is there some sort of trick?
To remove the shock rubbers, use two sockets and some threaded bar, place one socket so that i fits the inner diameter snugly (if you can a machined pipe will be better) and the other socket should be large enough so that the first socket will fit into it. Put the threaded bar through the two with a large washer on the large socket with two nuts, locked. Then place a single nut on the other side and tighten. Check as you go as the sockets may wander and not run true, it may require a reasonable amount of force to get them going.

This is the tool i made for mine




I have had a swing arm powder coated and left the rubbers in, I first put the whole swing arm in the oven at 200c (390f) for 1/2 an hour and they didn't melt! when i took it tho the powder coated i told him what i did and he was happy to do the job, the items usually only hold at 350F for 15min,

As for the swing arm bushes, good luck :lol: they may be the plastic ones and come out relatively easy or the metal ones that require, two cups of coffee and some lateral thinking :) I use a Dremill and slowly grind through the inner side of the bush until the sides are weak enough to allow a long punch to drive them out, a little heat helps to.
 

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Actually Rod helped me put my new shock & swingarm bushings in my powdercoated 360 swingarm last year....worked a treat :D

If ya look at my "CB 360 Project" thread you see the way I pulverised the old bushings into submission :?

Good luck with it and be PATIENT :cool:
 

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The standard process for power coating it to apply the powder to the item cold and then into an oven at 350f, once the item reaches 350f or the surface has melted or gone glossy, hold at that temp for 15min then let air cool.

Hot flocking is slightly different and an art as the max temp reached is up to the operator and the complexity of the job. But a standard process usually is. Bring the job up to around 440f and remove from oven, then apply the powder, the powder will melt on contact with the hot surface, this will allow you to "paint" the surface and see the coverage and final finish. Then back in the oven at 350f for final curing. If you're not confidant with your technique, runs and sags are inevitable :(

These are some of the parts i did for my CB450 Cafe. Not hot flocked ;)



And these were hot flocked and have some faults, ie, not hot enough and i touched the job in one or two places, but was happy with the end result :D

 

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66replica said:
It appears mine are metal. Hmm...
Ah grasshopper, this is when you truly become a man :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Ok, The rear fork center collar is out but I can't get the bushing. Since they're metal, shouldn't they be OK for powdercoat? I attached a photo. I still can't get the shock rubbers out. Are they a bearing or what? I guess I'll build the tool above and give it a shot.
 

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66replica said:
Ok, The rear fork center collar is out but I can't get the bushing. Since they're metal, shouldn't they be OK for powdercoat? I attached a photo. I still can't get the shock rubbers out. Are they a bearing or what? I guess I'll build the tool above and give it a shot.
The issue is whether the bushes are worm and need replacing, if they are ok, even if scrupulously clean may still ooze molten grease when heated ruining the powdercoat.

The shock bushes have a thin steel outer collar, this is the place to push onto remove them. If you push on the rubber part the rubber will eventually tear, and, well tears will flow :( You may want to WARM the swingarm, with out setting the rubber on fire or melting them, this may help ;)
 

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66replica said:
Thanks for the tips. How do I know if the bushings are worn out?
Not sure if the 360 manual tells you what to do or gives the nominal dia for the pin and internal dia for the bush :?: But it's usually done when the swing arm is fitted to the bike and you check for movement left and right.

Steve will know :lol: :lol: quack quack, duck shove coming through (an Australian-ism)

(http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.p ... ck%20shove)
 

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I'd just put the bushing on my replacement list... Especially if you're going through enough trouble to powdercoat everything.. You want it trouble free when you take her on your maiden voyage...

As mentioned before, do you wish to trust your life on some old bushings??



GB :mrgreen:
 

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66replica said:
Thanks for the tips. How do I know if the bushings are worn out?
With the bike on the centerstand, grab the rear wheel at the top and push hard, side to side.
There should be no side play at all, I mean none.
If there is, you’re gambling with your life - you have, in effect, a hinge in the middle of your frame. This is something that applies to all our bikes.
If you have side play, you need new swingarm bushings, at the least.
 

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66replica said:
I'm ordering some of the new bronze bushings. Pretty excited.
Your excitement will diminish as you try to remove the old ones..........

350's/175's/200's (that type) are less prone to this, as they have 4 swingarm bushings to share the load.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Haha. I took a quick wack at 'em last night...didn't go so well. I'll make a trip to pickup my dremel from my parents house and go to town on them.
 
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