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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For those that have gone before me.......

We talked about this a little in my 450 thread but I wanted to bring it up again in more detail. For my CB450 K3/K4 I want to have the motor basically original color but with polished cases, valve covers etc. I know the cases originally had clear on them but what about paint? Were they natural aluminum finish with only the clear or were they painted?

What about the Cylinders and the head?

I plan on using VHT Aluminum paint since it seems to have a heat tolerance to about 250 deg which should suffice and I think the aluminum color is a good match.

If the concenses is to use a clear, should I also clear the cylinders and the head? I'm concerned about fuel drippage on the top rear of the case where you see the most damage. There is no getting around some spillage when removing the tank and/or the carb float bowls, removing the fuel lines etc.

Leethal - what did you do with those pristine cases that you had hydro blasted? How about you others that have done original style restorations?

Thanks for the input.
 

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Mike -

No clear, it will turn yellow on you, just like the original clear that you have to take off with aircraft paint remover.

Duplicolor engine enamel (for the jugs, head, and crankcases) is a really good color match, and about half the price of VHT.
Since you'll have the engine in pieces, it will be easy for you to bake them after painting, and that helps the durability quite a bit.
I just throw a couple of shop rags under the carbs, that catches the small amount of fuel you lose when taking off the tank or messing with the floats. Remove the rags immediately, and you're golden.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
tbpmusic said:
Mike -

No clear, it will turn yellow on you, just like the original clear that you have to take off with aircraft paint remover.

Duplicolor engine enamel (for the jugs, head, and crankcases) is a really good color match, and about half the price of VHT.
Since you'll have the engine in pieces, it will be easy for you to bake them after painting, and that helps the durability quite a bit.
I just throw a couple of shop rags under the carbs, that catches the small amount of fuel you lose when taking off the tank or messing with the floats. Remove the rags immediately, and you're golden.
Cool, no clear it is then. I happen to have the VHT so no sense in wasting it. I've also got some Duplicolor and they look very close.

Bake em?? Hell, I'll just leave them in the driveway for a day. The surface temps here in Central Texas have been in the 130 deg range for the past few weeks. :D
 

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MNellis said:
Bake em?? Hell, I'll just leave them in the driveway for a day. The surface temps here in Central Texas have been in the 130 deg range for the past few weeks. :D

Holy smoke !!

It's been a cold summer here in Lake Michigan country, we start to sweat and melt if it gets close to 80 degrees.
So where's all this global warming?? Sure ain't happening here..........

For instance, it's 0830 am here, just barely 60 degrees - typical of this summer.
 

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What Bill? No mention of the self etching primer?? ;)

Another thought here.. If you plan on laying the parts out to dry in the driveway, then try laying them on something metal that's black. It should raise your temps quite a bit, especially if the parts have good surface to surface contact to what they're laying on..

GB :mrgreen:
 

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Hey Mike, only just saw this thread. I didnt do anything to any of the vapour bead blasted engine parts. They have dulled slightly but still look amazing. I've found they clean up easily just with a clean rag and metho.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
tbpmusic said:
Bird76Mojo said:
What Bill? No mention of the self etching primer?? ;)
GB :mrgreen:
You're dead right, GB - good stuff.
I've been etching and alodining aluminum airplane parts before using epoxy primer, for years. Since the cases were bead blasted before the paint I figured there was enough "tooth" for the paint to grab.
 

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Very interesting indeed...
 

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I think any bare aluminum requires some sort of protection. Anodizing, Alodine, Paint, Chrome, Alclad etc. are all acceptable methods. Many airplanes operate around water or salt (on the coasts) so corrosion protection is paramount especially in areas that can not be inspected easily. I actually thought about using a clear alodine(I use a gold color on the plane) but the coating is so thin that any nicks or scratches would defeat the purpose and, since it is so thin, it scratches easily.

Personally, I think alodineing a part that will receive epoxy primer is overkill and unnecessary. However, when it comes time to resell, many people like to see it. It's a throwback to the old days,

To Alodine or not to Alodine is right up there with "what kind of oil should I use in my bike". :)
 

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