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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi. Can the rear springs be painted on my 72 CL450? The springs are a combination of rust and chrome

Bud
 

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If you got them sandblasted and clean, no reason why not (I wouldn't think). Never done it, but maybe the only potential problem would be the flexing of them might cause paint to peel... powdercoat might be better, we see black springs on shocks in internet ads all the time
 

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I've painted the shock springs on a few dirt bikes I owned, and the paint held up really well, even with the abuse of off-road riding. There shouldn't be any problem with doing it. That said, the thicker the paint, the more prone it may be to cracking, so don't overdo it.
 

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I've painted a few sets as well and it does hold up surprisingly well. When I painted my first set I fully expected the paint to flake off after a while due to the spring movement but it held on quite good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks to all who responded. Since my guess is these shocks are in the same shape internally as everything else on this bike I will probably replace them.

Thanks again.

Bud.
 

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I'd try them out before trashing them. I cleaned up the original shocks on my '69 350 and they still work ok (about as well as they worked in '69...lol). Just my opinion, but if you're just riding the bike for fun and not trying to go off road or canyon carving, and your stock shocks still damp properly, you don't really need high-performance shocks.
 

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Unless the chrome is flaking away, they might be restorable and functional as is. On my ride, I ran the original rusted chrome rear springs across a spinning wire wheel, and with gentle pressure it removed all the visible rust. Then I degreased them so paint would stick, and sprayed with acrylic gloss clear. Looks good as new.
 

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I work for a spring manufacturer and we do spray paint springs all the time. Like 83XLX mentioned, you want to keep the coverage thin so stop spraying once it's all visibly covered.

It won't flake from being flexed, but it will scratch much easier than a powder coated spring. Powder coating is obviously a better choice, but spray paint is a fine do-it-yourself option if you want to keep it cheap.
 

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I work for a spring manufacturer and we do spray paint springs all the time. Like 83XLX mentioned, you want to keep the coverage thin so stop spraying once it's all visibly covered.

It won't flake from being flexed, but it will scratch much easier than a powder coated spring. Powder coating is obviously a better choice, but spray paint is a fine do-it-yourself option if you want to keep it cheap.
Great info - and knowledge like yours will be beneficial to us all at some point in the future. Now that you're a member of the nicest knowledge-sharing place online for vintage Hondas, please take a look at the link below and post an introduction for us - it'll only take a few minutes and will help us get to know you and your bike better to help you in the future

https://www.hondatwins.net/forums/23-member-introductions/121120-critical-read-before-posting.html
 
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