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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
About a month ago I replaced my chain and both sprockets. I used a JT 17T and an Outlaw Racing 34T and this chain.
I think I am using 104 links, but that shouldn't matter.

I am using Walmart brand "Supertech" Lubricant (pretty much a generic WD-40) to clean the chain, wiping it down with an old piece of towel and then applying Liquid Wrench chain and cable lube (L711).

Anyway, I've probably got around 600 miles on this chain. I lubricated the chain during install and twice sense then. I don't have an odometer beside the one on my smartphone's speedometer app. So I know rough mileage but not exact. I've been trying to clean and lube the chain every 200 miles. After this weekends rain the chain took on the orangish color of flash rust. and I noticed a couple of small rust spots on my sprockets. Once I cleaned and lubed the chain yesterday the orange went away and the squeak went away but I noticed that three links are kinked. I tried to straighten them but they are pretty stuck. I watched the kinks as I rotated the rear tire and they do not conform to the sprocket but stay raised.

I know those kinks will wear my sprockets out faster and could cause the chain to fail. I purposely bought a cheap non-o-ring with the intentions of replacing it more frequently than I would otherwise. I was expecting more than a month from it though.

I looked around the internet and all I've really found relates to people having kinks in old chains and it being a sign that its time to replace. Is there a way to save my chain? Would a kerosene bath, or something similar work?
 

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My guess is hat your chain lube is not sufficient to actually lube the pins and rollers.
I use a chain lube specifically designed for motorcycle chains. This lube goes on a foam
and soaks into the chain. I am running some old chains, they are greasy and dirty
but there are no kinks. I do not actually clean the chains I just ad more lube.
Soak it and get it loosened up and lube the h*** out of it with a good chain lube.
 

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Odds are it's toast. You can try the kerosene batch or the heated oil bath but I think at best it'll be a temp fix. Rust indicates that the chain plates weren't plated, just raw steel, and the lubricant is washing off while riding in the rain. WD40 or equivalent is fine for cleaning but it has to be dried off before adding lube or the lube will be diluted. I'd suggest getting a good quality O or X or whatever the new thing is chain and lubing it every 2 tanks of fuel or 300 miles with actual chain lube. A good properly maintained chain will last 20K. Don't bother with the fancy stuff on eBay, you want a DID, RK or EK chain. PJ1 makes 2 chain lubes, 1 O-ring 1 non. No need for all the cleaning, do that when build up gets heavy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I was afraid that was the case. The outsides of the plates were not rusty. It was the rollers and it had made a mess. The plates are plated, they wiped clean back to the gold finish. That chain in my link was $20 when I bought it. I guess you get what you pay for.

I'm still not back to work yet after my accident (I'm fit, just waiting for the next job to start, fingers crossed its only a week or so) and I don't exactly have $80 +/- for a chain. How quickly will those kinks hog out my sprockets? I still have the old chain and sprockets (lets see if I can find the master link), would it be reasonable to put them back into service to prevent wear on the new sprockets? The old ones are not heavily worn or lobed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Oh and I'll pick up some of that PJ1. The liquid wrench chain lube does state that it is for motorcycles and is O-ring safe. I'd read about other people using it with good results. I hadn't even thought of the WD40 diluting the lubricant if it doesn't have time to dry. Very good thinking LDR. Thank you!
 

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Check the forum, on the 450's there is a problem with O'ring chains rubbing on the engine case or the clutch lever, I forget which.
 

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O-ring chains can be problematic on all SOHC 4s...

WD40 is a water displacer, not a lubricant. And it will certainly water down lube and make it less effective and prone to failure.
 

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Save your life. tensile strengths are important. where they are made is important. What its length and pitch is too. Buy a good chain. you also say you don't remember what length it is . best you find out. As well as the pitch. I understand your thinking regarding upgrading later and I tend to agree But not with the drivetrain. Cheap inexpensive chains are exactly what they are. Try to buy North American First then Japanese and from a reputable dealer. Anybody can tell you that it a higher tensile strength but unless your going to take it to a metallurgist your at the sellers/manufacturer's mercy. Keep in mind too that chain can be purchased in bulk. and they snip what they need throw a link in and voila.. you gota chain. I had a link on chains at one time from ??? can't remember. But it was terrific. Best of luck Bud. be good
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thank you for all of you input guys. I will be purchasing a quality chain and changing my lubricant as soon as possible. Likely next week I will be able to get it ordered.

Found a deal on this RK XW-Ring chain

Doesn't look like it comes with a master link, I sent the seller a question to confirm this. If it doesn't, I can get proper link from RK for $9. This creates a new problem. I don't have a rivet press. Has anyone got a BUDGET rivet link press?

Also I spent some time today massaging PB Blaster into my chain. It's cleaned up a lot and and is moving more freely. It still has tight and loose spots and I WILL be replacing it asap and riding as little as possible until then. I'd like to say it won't move until it's fixed but it is my only means of transportation right now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Also, I checked my notes and I am in fact using 104 links. That chain I linked to is 106 links but I won't have trouble cutting it down. After looking some more I think this chain tool should get me by for pressing the rivet link.
 

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Personally I like the clip style master link, easy to remove as needed. Cycle Gear usually has them in stock behind the counter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I prefer the clip link as well but if you take a look at all the top chains from did/rk/ek ect they all seem to use a press link. I wonder if there is a difference in tensile strength or if the press link (when properly installed) is more idiot proof and that is why they are moving that direction. I think I will get a clip link and save the money from buying the press.
 
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Yeah, I've noticed that for the most part. However they all sell a clip type master link individually. I think it's more of a marketing thing because of all the horror stories floating around about link failure. Like the rivet type link they really are intended for a one time use even though people reuse them all the time
 
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