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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
If anyone has a picture of the internals of a 1976 CB360 right control (throttle side switch) that DOES NOT have a light control (just the kill switch and starter button), I would be exceptionally grateful. I have one that I am trying to determine if it's worth trying to "rebuild". I am trying to determine the wiring for the starter button specifically as there are three wires, which I assume are hot, load, and ground. I don't have the guts (starter button, spring, etc.) as they were replaced for whatever by the PO with the most ridiculous of buttons (mounted to the outside). In all fairness, it did "work" (minus the smoke, lol). I have added photos so you can see what I have going on.

IMG_5543.jpg IMG_5544.jpg IMG_5547.jpg


BTW, I do have the manual as well as the wiring diagram (I know the correct colors are not blue, yellow, & black, those are extensions that were added), however, I did not see one that does not include the light control as well as I am looking to see what the missing parts look like so I know if I can buy a crap switch of "eBay" to use the parts out of.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
As much as I appreciate the response, unfortunately not. This mostly shows the light control...that's why I'm looking to see the internals of one without it (like the one on the bike, apparently this was new in '76).
 

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As much as I appreciate the response, unfortunately not. This mostly shows the light control...that's why I'm looking to see the internals of one without it (like the one on the bike, apparently this was new in '76).
Sorry, no pic, but the switch is a double throw, single pole. The pole are headlight / 12v (from ignition) / starter.

When the button is not pushed, it connects headlight to 12v. When pushed, it supplies 12v to starter solenoid. There is no ground.

You can put a slightly later switch in. I have a cb600 switch. It had 2 microswitches on the button, one no, one nc. I sole red a bridge wire to connect the 2 switches so it emulates a spdt switch and wired as stock. Works great. Kill swith is different looking, but same function. Pics of it are in my build.

Sent from my SM-T800 using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
This is very helpful, thank you. This works as well, if not better than a pic, so thank you!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I've read a lot of threads where users were unsatisfied that the solutions were never posted/discussed/debate. So, I felt obligated as a user to do so in this instance in the name of information sharing.

After digging through my spare parts, I decided that I didn't have anything that was a suitable replacement for the starter button. So, as most of us do I am sure I turned to the eBay. Of course there were no starter buttons at the time (I'm sure there's one now, just to piss me off...), so I bought this:

Screen Shot 2017-10-29 at 7.45.08 AM.jpg

Here's a shot upon arrival:

cb360sb_1.jpg and cb360sb_2.jpg

This is after I opened it up:

cb360sb_3.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Solution to the starter button

Here is a video of the "inspection" of the starter button once pulled out of the control case.

 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
I did take the starter button apart. Mind you I am a starter button virgin, so please humor some of the things that I learned in this process. Firstly, that though the starter button case is "pressure fit" together, it is sealed some how, so it did not split into two halves, nor did I force it to do so out of fear of cracking it and rendering it useless.

I was able to remove the bottom metal plate (I cheated here, this is after install, I didn't take a before pic, but you would never know if I hadn't told you):
cb360sb_4.jpg

This exposed the plastic button, with spring that runs linearly and internally on the back side, as well as a small metal ball bearing that that rolls laterally front to back to activate the "teeter-totter" like switch mechanism.

cb360sb_5.jpg cb360sb_6.jpg


After a bit of manipulation, basically a struggle that included some words too unsavy to post in this eloquent forum, I did get the board that the three wires were soldered to (black-red: headlight, black: power & yellow-red: out to starter; as shared by Richard/Mydlyfkryzis above).

cb360sb_7.jpg

It is pictured above with the new mating wires from the CB360 switch control.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Solution continued...

As soldering goes, I'm typically a little better in execution than what you're about to witness, but I was (enter excuses here) 1) breaking in a new soldering iron, so I wasn't used to the heat control and 2) doing it in the garage where as I normally solder in a nice climate control area with a proper set of "helping hands"...eh, it worked.

I put a sheet of copper under the work for two reasons. I am working on my table saw, and I don't want solder sticking to (electrical solder will not adhere to copper when splattered, just slides right off) it and it acts as a heat sink still.

cb360sb_8.jpg cb360sb_9.jpg

I had to use a small pair of vise grips as a pair of helping hands that I clamped to the the work surface. I opened them with the thumb screw larger than needed, engaged the clamp feature, then closed them with it (the thumb screw) until it was finger tight to the board so as not to crush it.

I gave all the electrical parts a decent cleaning with electrical parts cleaner (CRC, it's what the store had when I bought it, I have no loyalty to it).
I also added dielectric grease to metal contact points. I thought this would increase contact as well as it was noted that water/vapor can get into the control, so this should help minimize future corrosion.

I put the "teeter-totter" switch mechanism back in. It fulcrums on a metal protrusion from the underside of the board where the wire were soldered. It is what receives the voltage from the ignition to then transfer it to either the headlamp or starter (hence the starter solder connection being in the back, so when the button is pushed, the linear spring disengages power when the bike starts...simple yet elegant design).

cb360sb_10.jpg

I packed the spring on the back side of the button with grease (black lithium). Again, I was looking for lubrication as well as to minimize corrosion over time. The grease also holds the spring in the plastic button, making it less likely to fall onto the garage floor and never be found. This is also true about the metal ball bearing the rolls to activate the switch. I did however use the dielectric grease, for better or worse...(one thought/worry was that it may end up creating a current through the system, you will see in a test this worry was unfounded).
Then I closed it up with the metal bottom case.

cb360sb_11.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Solution continued...there's even more...

Please see the physical activation of the switch (SPDT) once soldered and rebuilt in the housing.

 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Switch test pre-mounting to bike.

Here is a video of how I tested the switch once it was reinstalled to the bottom of the controls case. I did test every wire for continuity first, however that is not included in this video (I didn't video it at all actually).


Here is a pic of snaking it back through the handle bars. When I removed it I pulled a piece of 12gauge stranded wire I had laying around through so it would make reassembly easier. I used electrical tape to connect them after twisting them together, although I tried keeping it as slim as possible. I also used just a little bit of white lithium grease well spread out to on the cable harness to allow for easier travel through the rusted internal surface of the bars.

cb360sb_12.jpg

I will add photos of the cable routing later, as well as final product pics, and a video of it starting the bike. Date on the TBD...

Hope this helps anyone in a similar situation. I know that there wasn't much out there on the internals of this particular switch, so it's nice to have the reference material documented.
 
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