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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I found a nail in the rear tire of my CX500. Tire is tubeless and is only a year old, wondering if it is safe to put a tube in it or should I just pony up for a new tire?
 

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Assuming it's in the tread, I'd either plug it or put a patch on the inside (or both). Years ago, I got a nail in a brand new rear tire and had it plugged. I rode it till the tire was worn out and it never leaked.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It is in the tread, I would have to most likely have to plug it myself which I really don't want to do, would rather tube it(if possible) or replace it.
 

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I've plugged a tubeless rear before as well, never had any trouble with it either though if there was an alternative, I'd probably take it. If the nail hole is reasonably small, a patch on the inside would be the same result as a garage doing the same patch application on the inside of a car tire - it's really the better way and is very safe when done properly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I guess I will call the only tire place on the island and see if they will plug it for me, they refused to mount tires so that's on me.
 

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plug it or patch it but the short answer to your question is yes you can put a tube in a tubeless tire.

The only difference is a tubeless tire has beads that are designed to seal to the rim without a tube.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks, If local shop won't patch I will go the tube route. Thanks.
 

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If you go the tube route, I would, then inspect the area where the nail came thru. Sometimes there's burrs of the tire sticking up, grind that down so it doesn't abrade the tube
 

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As a retired law dog I wouldnt let a plugged tire anywhere near my patrol vehicle.Nor my personal vehicle. That being said I have plugged tires for people because they just couldnt afford any thing else. I vote with LDR.

Bill
 

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Aren't there safety issues with putting a tube into a tubeless tyre ?

Overheating at high(ish) speed is one factor, also that tubed tyres go flat straight away when punctured, whereas tubeless tyres usually deflate gradually, more chance of stopping safely.

Over here, it is fairly standard practice to plug tubeless tyres. Some tyre manufacturers don't approve plugs in Z rated tyres, but then they would, product liability and resale of new tyre concerns for them.

Plenty of 'get you home' plugging kits for sale here. I have one under the seat of my Hornet, never had to use it yet. I've picked up nails and screws, but always got home OK, got the tyre fixed locally. Best repair is a mushroom shaped plug inserted from the inside of the tyre, although many folks have reported using the temporary plugs right through the life of the tyre. Obviously, only in the treaded area, not in the sidewall, same as car tyres.
 

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I picked up a nail in the rear tire of my 81 Goldwing. I don't know how long it was in there. Then I rode it another 200 miles before I found a guy who could plug it. Ran it for another 8K before the tire was worn out.
 

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Aren't there safety issues with putting a tube into a tubeless tyre ?

Overheating at high(ish) speed is one factor, also that tubed tyres go flat straight away when punctured, whereas tubeless tyres usually deflate gradually, more chance of stopping safely.

Over here, it is fairly standard practice to plug tubeless tyres. Some tyre manufacturers don't approve plugs in Z rated tyres, but then they would, product liability and resale of new tyre concerns for them.

Plenty of 'get you home' plugging kits for sale here. I have one under the seat of my Hornet, never had to use it yet. I've picked up nails and screws, but always got home OK, got the tyre fixed locally. Best repair is a mushroom shaped plug inserted from the inside of the tyre, although many folks have reported using the temporary plugs right through the life of the tyre. Obviously, only in the treaded area, not in the sidewall, same as car tyres.

It is true that tubed tires do go flat straight away and not gradually like tubeless ones. At high speed a tubed tire can even pop like a balloon when punctured.

That said I have used tubes inside tubeless tires and have had no issues whatsoever for the life of the tires. The tubes don't overheat any more inside a tubeless tire than a tubed one.
Over heating is caused by under inflation.

BUT... That said, it actually would be less effort to patch or plug the tubeless tire than to install a tube inside it. Most of the work will be separating the beads from the rim and taking the tire off. Tubeless tires are much thicker and are generally a total PITA to remove.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
They sure are a PITA to remove, I'm not looking forward to it!
 

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Pictures of the tyre, nail and tyre inside. What size/section is your tyre.

Yes they can be a pita to remove ( and refit sometimes ) but thats all down the practice, and lube. Small bites of the cherry my friend.

If your going down the tube route, use a good quality tube with a smooth valve, rather than the valve that is nutted to the tube. Michelin airstop, size dependent.

I would also fit a relatively large patch to cover the nail hole on the inside, as this stops the tube being pinched every time the tyre goes over the nail hole.

Plugging would be my best advise if the tyre is repairable, hence pictures needed. Several of my bikes have tubes fitted. I fit my own tyres but the shop balances the car ones.
 

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Just plug it and run it. Why throw out a perfectly good tire otherwise? Unless you are track racing with it but holy hell, people have been plugging tubeless tire since they were invented. Hit up AutoZone or O'Reilly's and get a cheap plug kit for cars. Done.
 
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