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bake said:
One casting lug is bigger than all the rest on the fork legs, my bike didn't come with a front brake stay but I am guessing this is the left fork leg and the brake stay fastens on to the big lug (which would be closer to the motor)?

Yes that is the left fork leg
 

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Discussion Starter #82
nigelrharris03 said:
Yes that is the left fork leg
Great, really didn't want to have to take it apart to swap, odd that the brake stay then goes to the rear lug but good enough for me.

Honda (in Canada) has gone to what they call their "Power House's" where bikes, snowblowers, lawn mowers and cars are sold under 1 roof. Really it is no longer worth going to Honda here because they just don't fathom 1971 motorcycles, but they can sell you a lawnmower. It's truly unfortunate all the friendly family business are gone.

Anyways these are from my "needs some lovin" collection.





I am going to have to slow down on the build and get some more parts in while I wait for my valve guide to be machined.
 

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I just read through your mach 3 build thread...wow! You are a talented man! Your organization motivated me to clean my garage :). I can't wait to see this project progress.

Keep it up!
 

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Discussion Starter #85
Thanks for the kind words, that was a fun build. Sometime frustrating but very satisfying in the end.

Excuse # 362 for slowing down on the build is the garage is full and my wife wouldn't let me take over her side :shock: so I needed to get some "alternate storage"

At work we had a left over shipping crate that had 13' walls, I figured it would only take a little work and a little cash to make this into a perfect shed, boy was I wrong.... turned out the wall sections were only 6'6" high and adding on to them in snow country like here was not a good idea so I only got to use 1 wall section (back wall) that had no truss bearing, kinda sort.

Here's progress shots took about 2 weeks all in all.



experienced wall section


framed, facia and soffits done


and door and siding on


I am going to have to push the CL in there for a bit as I need to bore and stroke my KTM before winter and get it broken in. Meanwhile I have a nos valve coming and wanted to assemble and ride it before the snow falls but it doesn't look like it's gonna happen. On the upside is I have something to do for the winter.
 

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Nothing likes some storage space! I keep looking at outbuildings as I need some more garage space for some of my toys that have to sit outside. Maybe this winter that will happen.
 

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Discussion Starter #87
An accident at work has me at home healing, now that I'm up and around more I decided it would be a good time to try and make some progress so I started polishing up the exhaust clamps and was surprised at how good of condition the chrome was once the schmootze was removed





And it's time to start reassembling the head (which is intimidating me) if anyone has any good reading about how to rebuild a torsion bar head or a link to a build that has lots of valve train photos please pass it on as it's been 2 years since I tore it apart :eek1


On disassembly every part got bagged and tagged but that doesn't seem to be helping at the moment.


 

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I got my head together today. I had problems with the valve stem length. My machinist helped me out. Gizwiz's pictorial is very good. Also the factory shop manual and owner's manual was a big help. The shop manual shows how to time the cams. The owner's manual shows the valve lash setting. Go slow, be deliberate and let us know what you are doing.
 

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Discussion Starter #89
I do have the Honda Service manual but I find it lacking in the reassembly, unfortunately I didn't take enough photos on disassembly and while Gizwiz's tutorial is awesome it leaves me struggling to understand the order of parts in the very beginning.... As soon as the valves are installed the order of the seals and bits. Micro fiches don't really show what goes 1st, 2nd etc. I should be able to struggle my way through with a lot of questions.



the pic shows styles of "valve guide seal caps" the one on the right is the stock one, metal ring with a rubber insert while the one on the left is more of a fibre with the rubber insert.

My assumption is that the fibre is a replacement for the metal type?

Next question is do these go on first or the actual valve seal?

may be while I'm grinding my way through this I should try to expand on Gizwiz's sticky?
 

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I remember someone posting there is a difference between the CB500T and CB450 valve guide seals. The CB450 was out of production but the CB500 was the preferred. I don't know the difference. My 450 had the metal one in it, but someone had been through the engine before me. I really don't think it matters.

I did each valve separately. I started by removing the can chain guides so the head would lay flat on the work bench. Next the valve was placed in the guide. I put a small wad of paper towel in the chamber so the valve wouldn't drop. Then the seal went on with the keeper and bolt. The keeper has a small tab that goes toward the seal. Next was to assemble torque bar and valve lift arm. Then drop the retainer ring around the stem. I just used grease to hold the keepers in. Then pull the torsion spring up over the pin. I used a rare earth magnet on a small screwdriver to hold the small parts. Do this four times for each valve.

Next is to install the cam. Following Gizwiz's instructions, the intake side went in without a problem. However the exhaust side had a problem. This is when I discovered the exhaust valves were slightly too long. Paying attention to keeping the maximum open dimension on the eccentric shafts, the cam bearing blocks would bind when trying to push them in. My machinist ground .012 off each stem. Problem solved.

Timing the cams was a little confusing. When you set the cams to the alignment marks and the crank to L T, the exhaust is on TDC of the intake stroke. This puts cams into the valve open overlap area. The crank needs to be turned 360 degrees to set the lash on the left cylinders. It took a while to figure this out. It is a little scary to crank the valves down with the piston at the top of the stroke.

Go for it and keep us posted on the progress.
 

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Discussion Starter #93
Most of the head building drama is over, I still have some cleaning up on the covers to do then install the head and set the valves and cam timing but I'm short the cam chain master link so.....


A local body shop wanted $800 to do the 2 tone paint job on my tank and it's just way to much money so I have come up with what I hope is a reasonable solution.


Being that I powder coated/ clear coated all the other tins I decided to try that route with the tank, here goes..... took it in to the body shop to have this dint pulled





For $85 they pulled the dint plus a smaller one on the other side, last winter I bought the newest style of body solder (higher melting point than the old lead solder)



So next I attempt to fill the repaired areas and powder coat, followed by decals then back to the body shop for clear coat (powder clear won't work with the decal)


This looks like a perfect recipe for disaster.
 

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Discussion Starter #94
I was never happy with a few pieces I had powder coated chrome but after some of the parts sat on the shelf for 2 years it appeared something ozzed on the so I tried polishing out the powder (which cause the dullness on the right. The parts got tossed into the powder striper bucket and we will go with plan B




So instead of chrome powder coat they will be polished and get a coat of clear powder. Did I mention I hate polishing? Here's a shot of the cam covers that hadn't got any treatment yet so the plan is the same .... Polish then clear coat.

 

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The cam bearing blocks are made from a bearing grade aluminum alloy. They polish up nice, but will not stay that way unless they are immediately coated. Don't ask me how I learned that one...
 

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Discussion Starter #97
The cam bearing blocks are made from a bearing grade aluminum alloy. They polish up nice, but will not stay that way unless they are immediately coated. Don't ask me how I learned that one...

Thats interesting, I will probably give them a final polish just before shooting. Anyone know how they came stock, eg painted or just left raw? The castings are pretty shoddy up close.

Stou, I'm in Revelstoke BC and have been putzing with the trials bike for a couple of years and did my first event a month ago, I sucked but really enjoyed and learned a bunch while making some new friends.
 

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Discussion Starter #98
Polished and a clear coat of powder



Ready for service





Photography is not my thing, they look way nicer on the bench.

Now that I have all the head parts I'd like to set the valves before I install the head or at least check that I have the proper clearances (as I had to replace a valve and had the seats cut) Is there some reading on this board that addresses this?
 
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