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Discussion Starter #42
Hate to admit for the valve covers and spacer, I could not get the gasket off. Tried it all, razer, PB blaster, paint stripper. Those things were like stone!
I resorted to used a 3m yellow roloc bristle

I was shocked to see it scratches aluminium. It worked great in a die grinder. Im hoping since it is the valve cover and not under oil pressure it will be ok.
 

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I have only used the OE intake boots. I don't use the screws that Honda did if I can't install them with my impact, either a bolt or allen head if by hand. I also use a light spray of copper gasket.

I banned the use of roll locs or discs on engines. Not worth the risk of those fibres ending up in the oil where they will take out oil pumps, bearings etc. They work great on brakes jobs.
 

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Discussion Starter #44
Its going to hurt to buy a $90 set of boots but no air leaks is worth it.
Here is my valve cover (cylinder head cover?) The 3m wheel did a job on thesem, can I use honda bond on these parts or is that high risk? The head cover may have some low spots, I am checking them with a feeler gauge but the low spots are not as wide as the guage so its not fitting. But I can see light underneath the straight edge when I place it on the mating surface.

The gaskets on these were the worst Ive seen. Should I buy a new set on ebay and try again or are these salvageable?
 

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Old hard gaskets are always tough to get off, it's the least fun part of any rebuild. Buy gaskets and intake boots at 4into1, their gaskets are good and decently priced and the intake boots are OEM and a little less than the price you mentioned

these Vesrah gaskets are out of stock but I like them, used them many times

but they have these as well, though apparently they don't include the oil pump gasket and oil filter cover o-rings
 

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Discussion Starter #46
For the shift forks, is this groove from factory or is it wear. Looking online they all appear to have a lip of some sort. These forks are not bent, but trying to decide if I need to find a better set or not. Looks like Ineed to put them back in the gearbox to inspect them by measuring how far the fingers are from the gears? Or can I just measure the thickness of the fingers? Im not seeing a spec for the the thickness but rather a gap from the gear.

302696
 

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Both of those are probably not straight, despite them seeming to be so. Those marks are from the gears grinding on the fork, that is not original. I suppose it's possible that someone lead-footed the shifter a few times and missed a gear at the same time and helped cause the grind marks, but in my experience that usually means the fork is bent and you shouldn't use it. To put it another way, I wouldn't use it, especially the one in the foreground that is out of focus. The other one isn't nearly as bad, but if it were mine I'd replace them both and carefully inspect the dogs on the gears for rounding and excess wear.
 

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Discussion Starter #48
Ok ill pick up a better set on ebay, Ill have to post pics of my gears I cant tell if they are worn. They look ok as far as I can tell.
 

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Be careful with eBay trans parts. I bought a pair of trans shafts with gears and shift drum with forks for my drag bike project and the guy posted pictures that mostly showed them clearly, but the angle he showed did not allow the hideous wear on one shift fork to be clearly seen. The forks and drum were not my primary focus of the purchase so I took the chance and bought the parts, and it's pretty obvious the drum and forks did not come from the same bike as the gears all looked fine - but there was this... note the hot spot, this one got "rode hard". That's about as ugly as any I've ever seen, so be sure to check for clear views of all directions on shift forks you consider buying
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Discussion Starter #50
Im looking at this set, he sent me a pic of the back:

Do you have any leads on a good set? Here is a pic of the back of taht set, still a groove.
302699
 

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I haven't looked around for any, but the upper right fork in the picture has marks on it as you mentioned. They're cheap enough so if you can find another set with one of the outer 2 in good condition you'd be set (as long as the other side pics show up good). The outer forks are the same, just reversed on the drum IIRC, so your chances are good
 

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Discussion Starter #52
What causes them to grind? Someone mentioned if you dump the bike while gears are moving can cause it, not sure where I read that. Looking around, 95% of them have wear right there on that spot, not as bad as mine though.

Mine was dumped shifter bent but trying to figure out how that would cause this to happen if dumped, wouldnt they have to have pressure on them and pressed out of alignment?
 

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Looks like at least two of those forks in the picture need tossed. Shifting without using the clutch and stomping on the shift lever are the main reasons for bent forks.
 

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Why would someone stomp on the lever?
Some new riders see other uneducated riders do it and they think that's how it has to be done. Keep in mind that a lot of people learn to ride from their friends and neighbors, and often they weren't taught properly as well. And, because high performance cars have manual transmissions and they have synchronizers and are beefier and harder to damage, they think of the bike's trans as being and working the same way as a car. They think about those they've seen power-shifting a car trans and the yanking of the shifter that goes on during that activity and they translate that to the bike by using a forceful foot... in truth, all it takes is a little pressure on the shifter once your foot is in contact with it, but dropping your foot on it with momentum - moving downward (particularly) with force before ever actually touching the lever and carrying that momentum into the shift movement - is way more than necessary
 

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I worked in a couple bike shops back in the day, I've noticed some people seem to have a gift for tearing up machinery just by riding it.
 

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Then there were the ones,with their own tool set(vise grips and a hammer), who worked on it themselves. They end up bringing you a box job, missing parts, stripped fasteners and screwdriver tracks everywhere.
 
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