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Hello, I am new to the forum as I recently acquired a 1967 Cl160. I'm not looking to be a speed demon but I am pretty heavy in the weight department at 200 pounds. Is there any modification I could do so I can comfortably cruise at 70 mph or even 80 mph possibly? I'm ready to learn and get started on my journey. Thank you and much appreciation to anyone who can help.
 

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Hello, I am new to the forum as I recently acquired a 1967 Cl160. I'm not looking to be a speed demon but I am pretty heavy in the weight department at 200 pounds. Is there any modification I could do so I can comfortably cruise at 70 mph or even 80 mph possibly? I'm ready to learn and get started on my journey. Thank you and much appreciation to anyone who can help.
I exceed the payload of my CT110 by just sitting on it.
 

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Hello, I am new to the forum as I recently acquired a 1967 Cl160. I'm not looking to be a speed demon but I am pretty heavy in the weight department at 200 pounds. Is there any modification I could do so I can comfortably cruise at 70 mph or even 80 mph possibly? I'm ready to learn and get started on my journey. Thank you and much appreciation to anyone who can help.
Not really, 60-65 is about the limit for comfortable cruising speed. Best way to cruise that kind of speed is to get a bigger motorcycle.
 

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Not really, 60-65 is about the limit for comfortable cruising speed. Best way to cruise that kind of speed is to get a bigger motorcycle.
I would love to even get to 65, just so I can get on the highway without someone hitting me out of a fit of roadrage. I saw a lot of owners experience and these babies usually go up to about 50 with 200 pounds on it.
 

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The only difference between the CB and CL 160 is two more teeth on the rear sprocket,(40t) with a 200 pound rider it's likely to go faster than with 38 teeth, pulling high gear more easily. A bunch of us went on a three day, 1,000 mile trip in the summer of 1968, two CL77s two CL350s and a CL160. We averaged 60 miles per hour all three days, the guy on the 160 kept up with the others, pretty much WFO all the time. The bike went through a pint of oil in those three days but it never missed a beat.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The only difference between the CB and CL 160 is two more teeth on the rear sprocket,(40t) with a 200 pound rider it's likely to go faster than with 38 teeth, pulling high gear more easily. A bunch of us went on a three day, 1,000 mile trip in the summer of 1968, two CL77s two CL350s and a CL160. We averaged 60 miles per hour all three days, the guy on the 160 kept up with the others, pretty much WFO all the time. The bike went through a pint of oil in those three days but it never missed a beat.
Wow this really answered a lot of questions I had! Hell I can live with 60mph, it's gonna be driving in nothing but 45 mph roads either way lol. Thank you for the advice!
 

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Wow this really answered a lot of questions I had! Hell I can live with 60mph, it's gonna be driving in nothing but 45 mph roads either way lol. Thank you for the advice!
Along with a smaller rear sprocket, you can increase your top speed by changing to a larger front sprocket. You will have less pull off the line, but eventually end-up faster. A really thorough tune-up with special attention to the ignition and fuel systems will help a lot. Close attention to tire pressures will help too. Make sure your brakes aren't dragging, and check your wheel bearings. A clean and well-lubed (lightly) chain is a good idea. You will not reach the top speeds that you initially indicated on your post, but you can maximize what you have. There are not any "magic bullet" mods that are going to change your bike into a speed machine, but with meticulous attention to detail and and regular inspection and maintenance, you should be able to cruise at 60 mph easily all day long.
 

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You should be able to hit 80 but you won't be maintaining 80 on much of ascent. If your distant is short, you might get by but you're pretty much running wide open for whatever distance? CL's are basically street bikes with a higher pipe so they are still street bikes. Back in the day CB's were dealer converted to CL's because they were easier to sell. For some reason folks seem to like a hot exhaust pipe in one of the worst places you can think of.
 

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Along with a smaller rear sprocket, you can increase your top speed by changing to a larger front sprocket. You will have less pull off the line, but eventually end-up faster. A really thorough tune-up with special attention to the ignition and fuel systems will help a lot. Close attention to tire pressures will help too. Make sure your brakes aren't dragging, and check your wheel bearings. A clean and well-lubed (lightly) chain is a good idea. You will not reach the top speeds that you initially indicated on your post, but you can maximize what you have. There are not any "magic bullet" mods that are going to change your bike into a speed machine, but with meticulous attention to detail and and regular inspection and maintenance, you should be able to cruise at 60 mph easily all day long.
Most times, adding a tooth to the front sprocket isn't going to make things go faster, it's just going to make it harder to pull 4th gear up towards redline. 16 horsepower only goes so far.
 
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Most times, adding a tooth to the front sprocket isn't going to make things go faster, it's just going to make it harder to pull 4th gear up towards redline. 16 horsepower only goes so far.

I agree with you regarding the limits of 16 horsepower. We can agree to disagree on the effects of front sprocket change. It won't be much, but it will increase top-end speed. A good video from Common-Motors can be found here:
 

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Having owned several 160s over the years, and doing some sprocket changing in the process. I can tell you from experience that raising the gearing doesn't make it go faster, just makes it struggle more to keep up with traffic.
 
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Having owned several 160s over the years, and doing some sprocket changing in the process. I can tell you from experience that raising the gearing doesn't make it go faster, just makes it struggle more to keep up with traffic.
First, congratulations on your 160, they are great bikes. I really liked the two I had.
I agree with Mike about the hearing. My experience has been that Honda picks stock gearing that produces the highest speed on a level ground with a tucked in rider. The optimum gearing reached top speed at the rpm where the engine produces the peak horsepower. For you, that is 16.5(!) at 10,000 rpm.
You have a great classic bike. Enjoy it and be safe.
Larry
 
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