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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
July last year I installed new coils on my 450. I bought them from Dime City, but they are they same coils as sold from Mike's XS. In addition, I went to iridium plugs and non-resister NGK plug caps. I will say, that initially my condenser was not grounded and so the bike "tried" to run for maybe 5 minutes and in that time the coils were kinda warm. I figured out the issue and promptly grounded the condenser and I was back in business.

The bike ran fine the rest of the year (although I don't remember just how much riding time I did on it afterwards). I decided to have my carbs tuned on the dyno so this past March I fired up the bike and rode to the shop. Ran perfectly fine. Dropped it off and got a call a few days later that while the bike initially ran just fine, the right cylinder is no longer firing and they determined it was the coil.

I bought another coil, installed it and the bike is running properly again.

What I don't understand is why the coil went "bad". I asked them to test it and tell me what the ohms read and they said the primary side was giving only 1 ohm.

Is there anything wrong with my setup... my plug wires are copper and as I said before I'm running iridium resister plugs with the recommended non-resister caps? I just don't want this to happen again, but next time while I'm out on the road!

Technology Machine Electrical wiring Robot Electronics
 

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Premium Member
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175 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
This justifies my paranoia when I'm static timing my bikes.... I'm constantly turning the bike on/off and only on when I'm getting close to the timing mark. Sounds like the shop is to blame here which on one hand brings me relief and on the other, surely ticks me off.
 

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2,045 Posts
Instead of using a non-powered test lamp to check/adjust your static timing, you could just use a continuity tester -- the kind with a small battery and lamp inside the tester. You can then leave your bike's ignition system turned off. In fact, you don't even need a battery installed in the bike.

Clip one lead to the spring on the points and the other lead to a good ground on the bike. If the points are closed, the lamp will be lit. Rotate the engine until the lamp turns off -- that is when the points have just opened. I recently static timed my CL350 that way and it started and ran just fine. I then checked the timing with a strobe and it was on the money.

You can get a continuity tester for cheap at most auto supply stores, or make your own from an old flashlight, or use your multi-meter, or . . .

Ray
 
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