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Discussion Starter #1
In the process of bringing a 1969 cd175a back to life and one of the problems I have is bike came with no key, and do not see any key code on the switch so just wondering what my option may be, and will I have to obtain a new switch with a key or try a lock smith witch would most likely cost more then a new switch with a key. Any suggestions out there?
 

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According to my first google result, they key code is usually stamped on the face of the lock for Hondas of that era. Looking at eBay for NOS ignition switches that are supposed to be compatible shows that to be the case.

If so, a set of keys should be ten or twenty from eBay.
 

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I dont know anything about your particular bike. If that is the only item using a key on your bike, just go with a new one. If you have a fork lock and seat lock, I'd get a new one key'd.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
There are no numbers stamped on the face of ignition I will have check the fork lock face to see if anything is there. The new keyed ignition that match the one I have found on Ebay are about $90.00 from Malaysia and are NOS. So I guess if The steering lock is does not have a number I will try a locksmith and see if they can figure out a new key.
 

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There was an article in Practical Sportsbike about this sort of thing a while back, how bikes often ended up with separate keys and locks for the seat, steering and ignition.

Their solution was to take one of the lock barrels out, insert a non matching key, see which tumbler pins didn't sit flush with lock body, then file the key until the pins all sat flush.

I've been meaning to have a go at this on my CL175, which has different keys for the seat and ignition, can't quite figure how above method would produce a key that worked two different locks.
 

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Or file the "wards" down, a bit brutal but it works. If you have the barrel out with no damage, a good locksmith could make up a new key.

Number on the back of the switch unit??
 

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Or file the "wards" down, a bit brutal but it works.
Doh, of course. Modify the lock to fit the key, I see it now.
 

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Often you can just swap the pin order an that way you only need to file a little.
Just hold the key tightly in the tumbler when you file the bottom pins down to flush with the cylinder

Its not that tricky a job, I just rebuilt my house door locks to match a single key

Iirc when I did the same thing on my CD175 the locks are only 3 pins

If you need to open the lock to get it apart to rebuild it
Get a Honda key from a similar vintage to the bike ( This will be the key you can rebuild the lock for latter
Jiggle the new key in and out of the the lock rapidly while putting pressure on it as though you are turning it
The pins will eventually get confused and line up enough for you to turn the key ( the fewer pins in a lock, and the closer your new key is to the shape of the lost key the easier this technique is)
 

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All Honda ignition locks up to at least 1985 have the key number stamped on them somewhere. At some point Honda started hiding the key number. If there is no key number stamped on it then maybe a replacement lock. In this video the guy pulls the lock from a CT110 and has a locksmith make a key from the code. You could also buy one from a key vendor.

There are six wafers in the ignition lock and four in the seat and steering locks. Each wafer has three positions to line up. You can make a key by pulling the tumbles out of the lock a file a key blank to match the wafer length. In this video the guy makes his own key from a blank with a file.

Easy peasy on YouTube!
 

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There are six wafers in the ignition lock and four in the seat and steering locks. Each wafer has three positions to line up. You can make a key by pulling the tumbles out of the lock a file a key blank to match the wafer length. In this video the guy makes his own key from a blank with a file.

Easy peasy on YouTube!
Sorry Jim but that lock disassembly videos not right for this situation
That's not a 1969 lock, thats from an 80's or 90's bike

The key on the Op's bike should look like this Vintage-Original-60s-70s-Honda-TEC-Motorcycle-ATV.jpg
The internals of the matching lock type (late 60's or early 70's)
DSC_0007.jpg
And the 3 pin tumbler to match
DSC_0006.jpg
No wafers, just 3 pins like I already stated
It's easier to get any similar key put it in the lock and file the lower pins, that way you can rebuild all the locks to the same key even if the locks are different or have been replaced
 

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CT90, wonderful little bikes.

If you got a new "blank" key, you can start from there.

As long as it "locks" afterwards, else any old key or blade could be used to operate the lock. The thief does'nt know if the lock has been doctored. A thief would just whack a screwdriver in the lock and turn the barrel that way anyways, or just "lift" the whole bike into a van and drive off.
 

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CT90, wonderful little bikes.

If you got a new "blank" key, you can start from there.

As long as it "locks" afterwards, else any old key or blade could be used to operate the lock. The thief does'nt know if the lock has been doctored. A thief would just whack a screwdriver in the lock and turn the barrel that way anyways, or just "lift" the whole bike into a van and drive off.
You don't need a blank if you file the lock pins, you just need any key that slides into the lock.
The issue with just pulling all the pins so you can turn the lock barrel with any key or a ( knife?) blade is... The pins hold the key in place while the ignition is on. If you doctor the lock the key will fall out while riding or if you use a blade no key will be present. Either way the Cd 175's didn't have kill switches, so....the only way to quickly kill the engine is to lean down and turn the key ( which won't be there to turn)
 

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All Honda ignition locks up to at least 1985 have the key number stamped on them somewhere. . .
It may be more accurate to say that they ONCE HAD the key number stamped on them. You can thank us old guys if your number is not on the lock. Some of us didn't think it was such a great idea to have those numbers right out in plain sight. If you had a new bike and you often parked it in the same spot, someone who liked the look of your bike could simply read the number from the lock and go pick up a matching key from the local Honda shop. I remember using a scribing tool to neatly erase the number from my locks, after writing it down in a safe place. Lots of other people did the same thing. Otherwise, you would effectively be parking your bike with the key left in the ignition. At one time, I couldn't believe that Honda would be stupid enough to stamp all their locks with the key numbers!

Right now, 48 years down the road, and in a cruel twist of fate, a 1970 SL350 has come to me with no keys, and somebody has deleted the numbers from the locks. :!: :roll:
 

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Right now, 48 years down the road, and in a cruel twist of fate, a 1970 SL350 has come to me with no keys, and somebody has deleted the numbers from the locks. :!: :roll:
I thought it was genius at first myself, but then after working at Honda shops and realizing how easy it was to get a key, I immediately saw the downside of the idea. I never obliterated the numbers on any of my bikes back then but certainly understand why someone would have. crazy that you get hit with one of those "what goes around comes around" deals!
 

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This thread has inspired me !

Too wet and cold to do much in the garage. My CL175 has separate keys for the seat and for the ignition, so I think I'm going to bring the seat lock up to the house over the next few days, and match it to the ignition key. At the moment, I'm always choosing the wrong key when I return to the bike after a trip to the shops on it.

My CB175 has a matching lock set, taken from a CB200, makes life so much easier when one key fits all three locks. I got some spare keys as well for that lock set, but only one key at present for the CL175, another thing I ought to sort out before I loose or break the only key.
 

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Well, that went well. Not.

It was not immediately obvious how the seat lock came apart, couldn't get the lock barrel out, appeared to be held in by some sort of snap ring, couldn't see how to remove this. So I prised off the brass cover that retains the springs and plungers, and simply removed them, then reassembled the spring load seat latch mechanism. Result, any key will now unlock the seat, so I have achieved my objective of being able to unlock the seat using the ignition key.

Flushed with this partial success, I set about the steering lock. This one I was able to disassemble, by pulling out a roll pin and separating the lock barrel from the steering lock pin. Removed the lock barrel, retrieved all pins and springs which fell out. By swapping pins around I could make the lock work with my ignition key. However, reassembly defeated me, no way I could get all the pins and springs to play nicely, ended up loosing a couple. So I've resorted to removing that little brass cover again, and inserting the pins and springs that way, as per original assembly. Can't get the cover to stay in place now, I've lost the swaged over edges that were retaining it. So at the moment, a piece of lock wire is holding it down while the JB Weld sets.

Not convinced that this will work, but then, I never use the steering lock anyway ...
 
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