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I have too many parts and not enough space. I want to put a lot of my stuff into long term storage. I currently have a lot of loose parts laying around on shelves and in small boxes. I also have a mostly disassembled vf500f and a complete cb450sc that will not be seeing the road again. I intend to buy another vf500f in the future and wish to keep the engine I have as it is a runner with 28k on it. I have a cb450sc engine in pieces. and two complete cb450sc engine's waiting for tear down and investigation.

I need advice on long term storage of engine's and parts.
My only storage options are essentially outside in the Bay Area of California. Very moisture prone during the winter months and still pretty moist in the summer.

The VF500F engine is a very long term storage item, up to 5 years. I plane to build a crate around it, plug the intake and exhaust openings with shop towels and put some motor oil down the plug holes then spin it a little to work the oil around. I will also wrap the entire engine in a garbage bag before crating it. Is there anything else I should do for long term storage?

The two cb450sc engines will be torn down in the near future (within the next year) for inspection and rebuild using the best parts of the two complete engines and the engine in pieces. These engines are sitting 1: in a car port with the side covers on, plugs in, oil in the bottom end and a little oil in the cylinders with shop towels in the intake and exhaust. 2: complete in a bike with carbs and exhaust installed. nothing else done.

cb450sc engine #2 will get its exhaust removed in the next week or so. That bike is outside and under a waterproof cover. What is the best way to block the exhaust ports from debris and moisture? That engine is already ruined with a smashed valve stem but I want to prevent further degradation.

My biggest question is about loose parts. Stuff like cylinders, heads, cams, pretty much loose engine parts. Stuff that normally lives in oil and isn't painted or coated.

Should these parts be kept oiled and in air tight bags? What about packing them into large storage tubs?

I have some available indoor storage but things would need to very securely packed in space economical containers that would not allow any leaks or spills. As I mentioned above, large storage totes. How would one go about packing fragile engine parts in a safe (to the part and its storage area) way with other parts in a tote. I have a good supply of shop rags I could use to separate parts once they are bagged.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
 

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Here in Olympia, Washington, there’s a brewery that sells empty 55 gallon steel barrels for $5. The barrels are basically new; they carried apple juice from the east coast, once. They have lids with rings and they’re waterproof. I bought four when I was moving, filled them with books and fabrics and all sorts of things and they sat outside for two years. I would check on them and retrieve items periodically, they were always dry. They still look pretty new.
Maybe brewers in your area make apple cider the same way and sell cheap barrels.
 

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I would use grease on all separate parts (f.e. cylinders), and the use stretch wrap (or perhaps heat shrink wrap).
Definitely get some oil into the combustion chamber of the engines. Filling it up to the brim with oil may not be a bad idea either, because the internal parts may start to rust otherwise. Any oil would do, since it will not run on it...
 
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