Honda Twins banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi.. my bike is almost ready but i have at least one question..
I had to remove the right carb limit screw because i the idle was too high.
time ago this was not an issue
did this happened to anyone?
and in case how did you solve this ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,561 Posts
Sounds like you have a more severe version of the problem I had with my left carb. The felt seals on the throttle shaft are probably leaking air, so it still idles with the throttle nearly or completely closed. In my case, it was on the side of the carb the cable connects, but either side could be at fault. If you spray some thick oil into the gap between the levers and shaft and it gets better, there's you answer. I used primary chain lube, the kind advertised to not sling off like oil, on the outer seals; I fabricated a seal with a silicone sealant over the cable side seal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,537 Posts
It is common for the carbs to leak air around the throttle shafts after cleaning. There are felt seals that dry out. I went to the trouble of making new felt seals and installing them. Even after that, the idle problem persisted. Then I read some info on the internet and learned the seals needed lubrication. If you have a shop vac and want to go to the trouble do this:

  • remove the carbs

  • attach them to the shop vac with duct tape

  • turn the vacuum on

  • put one hand over the open end of the carb

  • spraying oil into the throttle valve shaft bores
I use Liquid Wrench general purpose aerosol oil. The throttle works smooth as silk. I would be careful about using chain lube for this. It gets really gummy. My 450 drops into the idle speed like it should. Modern gas will get gummy if it is left to dry and will make the shafts stick. I did this to the throttle shafts on my GL1200 and they work great. When I got that bike the throttle and choke shafts were frozen. The GL1100 I'm working has the throttle shafts frozen too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,561 Posts
The wax-based chain lube does get gummy over time; I haven't, yet, seen the all synthetic lube do this. Time will tell.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,537 Posts
The wax-based chain lube does get gummy over time; I haven't, yet, seen the all synthetic lube do this. Time will tell.
The method I outlined will actually draw the lube into the throttle shaft bore. I would be careful with what you put in there. I don't have a lot of experience with chain lube. My 450 is the first chain driven bike I've had since 1976. Back in those days we just would use oil. I'm still on first can of the modern spray lube. it gets gummy and I'm not sure it is as good as the old oil. The oil oil would sling off. The new stuff needs to be cleaned off during chain servicing because it attracts dirt and grime.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,561 Posts
I've been using a Maxima branded synthetic lube for years, and have more than 5000 miles on the chain and sprockets, with little sign of wear. Thinking I was nearly out, I bought another can of Maxima at the MC shop, but it is their paraffin based chain wax; used it once, and have since cleaned it off and replaced it with the synthetic, because the chain got really dirty in a few hundreds of miles. Yes, there is always some dirt that gets on a chain, but it seemed worse with the wax lube. I use it for general lubrication of other things now. There are other brands I haven't tried, but since the synthetic seems to work so well, why try another?
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top