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Discussion Starter #1
I am sure some of you pro`s know all about lacing spokes, but here is what I learned on my 71 cb175, I changed the hub, mine was broke

there is a difference between inner and outer spokes
the outer always is on top of an inner where they cross
install all the spokes on the hub first, both sides
organize the spokes by using a bread twist tie to secure adjacent inner and outer spokes where they cross
start installing on the rim chain side up, then flip over and do brake side
thread the nipple only a few turns to give plenty of slack.

now on to tightening and truing
 

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Did you measure any offset before you took it apart?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
now onto truing, I mounted the wheel back on the bike and clamped a wood paint stir stick to the shocks across the top of the rim, almost have it round, needs a little more tweaking.
 

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I learned to number the nipples in the rim. 1,2,3,4.. 1,2 for the left and 3,4 for the right.. basically following them left to right .. all the #s corresponded to the spoke, so if u looked at the nipple inside the rim, you knew what spoke it was and where it was located on the hub.
 

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I just set the hub on the edge of my bench, loaded one side with inner spokes, ran my finger around to angle them, then layed the rim over and placed each spoke into the correctly angled hole, threaded the nipple on, skip 3 repeat.
Then flip and repeat. Outer spokes were even easier, at that point the angle of the holes in the rim are your guide.

I picked up the HF balancing stand and I'm currently waiting on ebay spoke wrenches. I may grind my own this weekend if I get that bored.
 

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I've built a couple of wheels, but I'm still getting my head around truing them up and tensioning the spokes evenly. I'm using this balancing stand whilst attempting to true the wheels.


20160721_165202.jpg

20160610_171419.jpg
 

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I thought that the 175 wheels were laced symmetrically, no offset ?

Or do you actually mean run out, ie 5/16" out of true ?
 

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Offset is where the "measurement" from the rim edge to (correct me if I'm wrong) bearing surface on the chain side..
as for what you have and what the factory recommends.. you have to confirm you are measuring from the same locations..
But since you measured prior to disassembly.. you know where you should be..
Also, I had to "adjust" my off set on one of my rear wheels (triumph hub-harley rim) because of the tire thickness..chain interference...moved the hub out 1/4" .. no issues on either side ..
 

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Good topic. I've built about a dozen wheels over the years for my mountain bikes. It was difficult at first, but got a lot easier over time, and the ultimate test of a good build was how often I had to re-true the wheels after so many hours of riding. I used Spoke Prep on the spoke threads- it seemed to act as lube during the truing process, then took a set, acting as 'locktite.' I was taught to take a mallet and lightly hit the spoke at the outside bend- this seated the spoke bend in the hole, and when I was thinking I was done and the wheel was trued, I'd tap each spoke mid-length with the wrench and determine the tension by the sound that each spoke made. That's essentially getting each to a near identical tension- the higher the ring, the higher the tension. Too little tension is real bad, but too high tension would likely damage the wheel itself as the spokes would be trying to pull through the rim, thus rendering it junk. It's also very important to use a tight fitting spoke wrench on the nipples. A bit of heat might help to loosen seized nipples too.

During the rebuilding of my Sloper, I disassembled the wheels, cleaned all the parts, and reassembled them using a light coat of blue loctite on all the threads, which seemed to work as well as Spoke Prep. I let them sit a few days and tested the locking strength of the blue loctite by trying to turn the nips on a few of the spokes. No problem!! I also determined the tension using the tone of each spoke to get to the desired tension, and also used the mallet on the spoke bends to set them against the hub. Time will tell, of course, but the whole process went very well.

The offset you described is called 'dish' in the world of bicycles. What's important is that the rim/tire is centered in the swingarm.

Linseed oil is a common thread locker as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Sorry to harp on about this, but I was pretty sure that there is no offset on the 175 wheels ie centreline of rim central to centre line of hub ?

Anyone confirm this ?

Otherwise, I've built my wheels wrong …

EDIT Just found this post, NO offset.

https://www.hondatwins.net/forums/44-tires-wheels-brakes/43743-wheel-offset-cb175-k6.html
ok, lets say you are correct and the 1/4 in measurement was to make sure the center line of the hub and rim line up and its off by 1/16 in, will it matter? btw I mounted the new tire and installed it on the bike, seems to be ok.
 

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First I'd like to ask if the nature of the hub failure involved the spoke flanges in any way?

I couldn't find any reference to a wheel offset in the FSM for this bike. One could conclude there is no spec for offset. But owning the bike and measuring the parts yourself, I'd defer to that experience having ridden the bike and knowing/enjoying its specific handling characteristics.

I understood that offset (on a drum brake hub) was measured from the edge of the rim to the protruding edge of the brake side. That's the way I've seen it diagramed in other Honda FSMs.

Measuring 1/4" offset and reassembling so that the wheel is quite close to the way you found it (within 1.5mm or 1/16") is a fine starting point. The spec in the FSM for wheel runnout is .5mm or 1/32" so having the rim offset a mere 1.5mm shouldn't really ruin your day.
I'm sure the bike will track reliably and predictably and will be as safe as it ever was.

You have the tire mounted, please let us know if you've noticed anything during your riding.
I suspect all will be well. (balls vs money, balls always win in matters like these)
 

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Discussion Starter #19
First I'd like to ask if the nature of the hub failure involved the spoke flanges in any way?

I couldn't find any reference to a wheel offset in the FSM for this bike. One could conclude there is no spec for offset. But owning the bike and measuring the parts yourself, I'd defer to that experience having ridden the bike and knowing/enjoying its specific handling characteristics.

I understood that offset (on a drum brake hub) was measured from the edge of the rim to the protruding edge of the brake side. That's the way I've seen it diagramed in other Honda FSMs.

Measuring 1/4" offset and reassembling so that the wheel is quite close to the way you found it (within 1.5mm or 1/16") is a fine starting point. The spec in the FSM for wheel runnout is .5mm or 1/32" so having the rim offset a mere 1.5mm shouldn't really ruin your day.
I'm sure the bike will track reliably and predictably and will be as safe as it ever was.

You have the tire mounted, please let us know if you've noticed anything during your riding.
I suspect all will be well. (balls vs money, balls always win in matters like these)
the hub failure was due to the previous owner installing a 52 tooth sprocket from a dirt bike, not honda, and beating the crap out of it, since it did not fit right it broke off part of the hub just outside of the bearing(the part that holds the dust seal and circlip)
 

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ok, lets say you are correct
My reference was 66Sprint, who is the fount of all knowledge on these bikes. When he states something, we can be certain that it is a fact, not an opinion.
 
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