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Hello,
I'm new to dealing with the issues of a vintage Honda Twin and a few questions are emerging as my all-original 1976 CJ360T begins a new life on the road after 25 years of inactivity. Thank you for your patience. I have three questions:

A.) What would be the symptoms of a Keihin CV carburetor that had a pinhole (or a tear) in the nitrile rubber diaphragm? What would be the operating characteristics of the engine that would indicate inspecting the diaphragms?

B.) Is it necessary to remove the centifugal oil filter (with a special tool) to remove and replace the clutch basket or is it possible to simply pull the entire clutch assembly leaving the filter intact?

C.) Do you recommend using an in-line fuel filter even if the inside of the tank has been completely cleaned and sealed with POR-15 product? If so, can you suggest an effective filter brand/type?

Thank you in advance for your patience with a person who is very interested in preserving a vintage Honda, but may have some naive questions about doing so. I respect and appreciate your collective know-how.

Regards,
Tim
 

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TimmyB said:
B.) Is it necessary to remove the centrifugal oil filter (with a special tool) to remove and replace the clutch basket or is it possible to simply pull the entire clutch assembly leaving the filter intact?
I just removed the clutch and filter on my 450 this evening (see my 450 project post) and I had to pull the filter to get the clutch off. I don't know if the 360 is different but it should say in the service manual......you do have a service manual, right. :) If you don't, follow this link and the instructions and you can probably find one there.

viewtopic.php?f=20&t=1127
 

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a. Carbs would have no mid-range or main-circuit response and would have a very poor idle. To test the diaphram for failure remove the air filter (or the whole carb assembly) and push the slide to the top of its travel. Put your thumb over the 'banana-shaped' passage at the top of the intake port there. Now let the slide fall back down under its own weight. If the diaphram is good..the slide will fall slowly, if its got a hole..the slide will return quickly.

b. The clutch springs/ pressure plate/ all the discs/ lifter joint piece/ and the clutch centre can be removed without needing to pull the oil slinger. But to remove the clutch outer you will need to remove the oil slinger.

c. Sealing the tank is a good idea on these old bikes. Fitting an inline fuel filter is an even better idea, and should be mandatory! (unless you love to rebuild carbs ;) ). Paper or sintered filters are small and effective and should be available for a couple bucks at any auto part store or bike retailer.

Good luck mate :cool:


...oh...and make sure you download that service manual....
 

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leethal said:
c. Sealing the tank is a good idea on these old bikes.

no no No NO NO NO NO NO


If you want nothing but headaches and heartbreaks down the road, then by all means, seal the tank.

If you want to ride ride RIDE and live a happy life, then simply clean out the loose rust (1" pointy drywall screws, diesel fuel and muscle is MY favorite method) and run inexpensive in-line filters, available everywhere for a couple bucks. For the first few tanks, carry a few spares with you on the bike, or just preventatively change 'em out. After a while, all the rust that was going to give you any problems will be gone.

If the tank is already sealed, RUN THE FILTERS ANYWAY!

Just my two cents... :D


For the manual, search this very site. Bill (tbpmusic) has linked the 360 manual as a .pdf file more than once. :)
 

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I'd like to add that if/when you store it for winter or any length of time, make real sure you top off the fuel tank to avoid condensation and more rust occuring. Fill it to the bottom of the filler neck.

GB :mrgreen:
 
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