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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So here's the question: I was which of these products can take the most heat.
It will be used on an engine part, but I don't believe the part will even get close to 500*.
Has anyone here used these products for anything close to that?
:) Thanks
 

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I would read the label for the heat tolerance. The problem is probably not that the epoxy will get soft or anything wierd from heat but that it expands and contracts at a different rate than the metal in is against. In other words, filling a hole might be OK but if it can cleave off it will.

Edy
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
solarae said:
I would read the label for the heat tolerance. The problem is probably not that the epoxy will get soft or anything wierd from heat but that it expands and contracts at a different rate than the metal in is against. In other words, filling a hole might be OK but if it can cleave off it will.

Edy
I was thinking the same thing, Thanks for the reply. :D
 

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A few years ago one of my endurance team mates crashed a Suzuki SV650 that we were racing and part of the damage was the neck where the radiator hose attaches. We used JB Weld that night to patch it and then raced it the next day and the rest of the season without any leaks.
 

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J-B Weld is the mechanic god's gift to us, the wrenches that break things or fix other's mistakes.
My CBX had J-B Weld patching my gas tank for the whole 5 years I owned it until two weeks ago when I sent the tank out to be painted.
I did a POR-15 clean and acid wash treatment {No sealer} to the inside of the tank and had my painter weld in some new steel where the cancer and J-B Weld was.
Needless to say, J-B Weld is where it's at. ;)
 

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When I was a kid we used JB weld to repair Honda single cylinder engine cases all the time. Great sucess. JB weld is a hight temperature epoxy with metal in it. If you want to go to the next level there are Aluminum brazing kits available. It is used to repair and restore old outboard motors. A Map gas torch works best. I'm not endorsing these guys (just a quick google), I think you can find the materials cheaper.

http://aluminumrepair.com/land2/index.h ... agodggS7wA
 

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I used JBWeld to build up a corroded (and thus leaking) exhaust port on my boat exhaust manifold. Worked for several years before I sold the boat. I don't think there's any hotter temperature to be found on your motorcycle than that.

Go for it.
 

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Not nearly the operating temps you are looking for. I used JB for the part of the crankcase that the cord protector screws into over the sprocket behind the left rear cover. Did it about 2 weeks ago and put some miles on the bike with no issues so far.

By the way have you met the Honda Twins mascot?


 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
drones76 said:
Not nearly the operating temps you are looking for. I used JB for the part of the crankcase that the cord protector screws into over the sprocket behind the left rear cover. Did it about 2 weeks ago and put some miles on the bike with no issues so far.

By the way have you met the Honda Twins mascot?


Yep, in my younger days I knew a this farmer who's daughters were Twins and they did ride a little Honda :lol: .
 
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