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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had the opportunity to talk to a jolly old biker guy today that had a ton of vintage Honda parts for sale. I mentioned that I plan to rebuild my carbs soon and his demeanor changed drasticallywhen he shouted "you don't need to rebuild ****! Just clean it!" He went on to explain that none of the parts in a carb can go bad, they just need a good dip in a chembath.
What does the communal wealth of Honda Twins think about that? I've been avoiding rebuilding my carbs just out of hesitation to order the rebuild kits. I assume I would at least need to replace all the o rings. Or would any of you just throw a carb in a chemdip overnight and call it good?

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As long as the metal parts aren't corroded and can be cleaned, there's no need to replace them. It all depends on what you're starting out with. Generally, all the rubber parts will need to be replaced, though.
 

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There's felt and rubber that dipping will harm. The only brass I'd replace would possibly be the jet needle and needle jet, and I'd be Leary of that. Some aftermarket jet needles have a rough finish that could file away at the jet and cause wear. Maybe the float valve but I'm running an original. I've bought bad bowl gaskets and good ones. I hear today's chem dip isn't near as strong as the old stuff, but it's good for dirty appearing carbs. Last few times I cleaned mine I just sprayed them with carb cleaner and compressed air.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I've become well acquainted with pulling my carbs over the last few weeks. I suppose it wouldn't hurt to try a deep cleaning and some new o rings wouldn't hurt anything.
I'm not sure if it's the dust pit I went through in central oregon, or the high desert altitude of Reno were in now, but my old girl's been running like **** the past couple weeks.

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There's felt and rubber that dipping will harm. The only brass I'd replace would possibly be the jet needle and needle jet, and I'd be Leary of that. Some aftermarket jet needles have a rough finish that could file away at the jet and cause wear. Maybe the float valve but I'm running an original. I've bought bad bowl gaskets and good ones. I hear today's chem dip isn't near as strong as the old stuff, but it's good for dirty appearing carbs. Last few times I cleaned mine I just sprayed them with carb cleaner and compressed air.
I keep using the same brass parts(I clean all the original brass parts separately) and only replace the rubber o-rings and seals w/ factory oem rubber seal kits.The original jets,needles,float valves,etc. work much better than an aftermarket "carb. rebuild kit" and that has been proven many times by lot's of folks.
I have used cans of carb. cleaner like Gumout,etc. to first blast-out all the passages and then use a little(60-85 psi is plenty) compressed air before installing all the new rubber seals and then re-installed the original metal parts,I hesitate dipping/immersing carbs. in a strong chemical dip,it's not really necessary imo. ;)
 

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Depending on the elevation you were at when you set up the carbs may require some changes for the 4500' Reno elevation. Higher elevation means less dense air which require less fuel. You may need to reduce the main jet 1 size
 

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I very rarely end up buying new carb parts, usually the one ones I do buy are different sized jets if I change the intake or exhaust and have to compensate. I take the carb apart and give it a good cleaning ensuring all the passages are clear and the jets are clean. That's about it. Only time I replaced parts was if they were either damaged or missing. Absolutely no need to buy rebuild kits without first opening it up to have a look.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Depending on the elevation you were at when you set up the carbs may require some changes for the 4500' Reno elevation. Higher elevation means less dense air which require less fuel. You may need to reduce the main jet 1 size
We started off in Portland, basically sea level.
Is there any other way to restrict the fuel flow in higher elevations? I'm only here for another month before I move along, and I'll be often changing elevation.

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Rest the mixtures is the only other way and that's not too effective, it'll still be rich. Set your idle speed higher when done and that will help keep the plugs from fouling. Buy and extra set of plugs, once fuel fouled they are throw aways.
 
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